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Old 09-16-2016, 03:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
In terms of heavy rail kinda. There is regional rail of course but the MD Purple line will be the first suburb to suburb rail in the region without going into DC. All of the major jurisdictions have their own bus services that run independent from Metrobus, but in addition to Metrobus you have DASH, ART, Ride On, The Bus, Circulator, Loudoun County transit etc.
Metro must have an endless pit of cash, because how do you have a ton of maintenance issues and exand at the same time?
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Old 09-16-2016, 03:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
The Woodley Park stop is easily a half mile outside of Adams Morgan.

As for the black neighborhoods thing, there's no metro in Petworth or Trinidad or, frankly, most middle-class black neighborhoods. And then there's this:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...e-youre-white/
The Green Line serves the western portion of Adams Morgan (at Columbia Heights station) as well as Petworth (there's a "Georgia-Avenue Petworth" station). Trinidad is roughly a half mile from the NoMa-Gallaudet Red Line station.

Some snooty Georgetown residents originally fought against having a Metro station when the system was planned in the 1960s, although the neighborhood's attitude has changed substantially since then, and I've read that long term plans call for a branch off the Orange-Blue-Silver lines would loop north through Georgetown with a stop there before rejoining the main trunk line.
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Old 09-16-2016, 03:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I'm not so sure it tops Boston.
I would say Metro beats out Boston. Yes the T is great and comprehensive, but has flaws. The main flaw, as noted above is the Green Line, which funnels 4 busy streetcar lines into 1 2-track tunnel -- the oldest subway in America, of course. But the main trunk line through Back Bay and downtown is slow and tedious: Green Line trains are often slower than autos, bikes and, even pedestrians, in short stretches.

Also when Boston tore down the old Orange Line el from above Washington Street, it relocated the Orange Line away from core portions of Roxbury and Dorchester (an into Amtrak's NEC open cut far to the west) leaving an open hole in the system which MBTA attempted to fill partially with the Silver Line BRT bus line, which is not nearly has long or effective as the old el.

Overall, the Metro is much faster and more comprehensive than the T. Metro serves D.C. pretty well (with of course the Georgetown flaw and weak East Capitol Hill coverage imho). Metro fans much deeper and wider into D.C.'s suburbs than the T does into Boston's.
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by usernameunavailable View Post
DC only has 5 commuter rail lines (3MARC 2 VRE) compared to 13 for Boston, 14 for Phila. That is my biggest issue with DC transit personally.
Boston and Philly don't have that many lines (unless you're counting street-level trolleys, which are basically like buses). And some of those lines have like two trains a day, so are basically useless.
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Boston and Philly don't have that many lines (unless you're counting street-level trolleys, which are basically like buses). And some of those lines have like two trains a day, so are basically useless.
Those numbers are correct, and thats just regional rail. Most of the city trolleys run under ground for a good portion of their route. The suburban trolleys run on dedicated tracks. None of those SEPTA routes have two trains a day. Some of them run every half hour, the outer-suburbs have strictly commuter level service, but where it interlines closer to the city and within the city, service can reach frequencies of every 15-20 minutes even outside of commuter hours, it's just not heavily used in that capacity because of cost and transit redundacy issues.
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by usernameunavailable View Post
DC only has 5 commuter rail lines (3MARC 2 VRE) compared to 13 for Boston, 14 for Phila. That is my biggest issue with DC transit personally.
Yes but, at least compared to Philly, there are trade-offs. Philly does have its very comprehensive, 13-branch (and electrified) regional rail system covering parts of Philly and wide areas of Philly suburbs. But Philly's conventional subway system is rather modest for a city Philadelphia's size -- its much larger than D.C. (Philly has 1.5 million vs. D.C.'s 650K inside the city). SEPTA's regional rail, in many ways, doubles as a rapid transit system (with 4 lines not penetrating the city limits and 1, the 6-mile Cynwyd line, traveling only .6 miles beyond Philly's city line... But Philly's pseudo regional rapid transit runs with large, bulky slow-boarding (with largely low platforms) passenger railroad equipment and hourly, non-rush frequencies on most lines. Washington does have long distance commuter rail, but it's limited by its level of service -- only weekday rush hour and nearly all of its lines... But D.C. seems to have an advantage in having a rapid transit doubling as a commuter/regional rail than Philly's having the opposite.

Last edited by TheProf; 09-16-2016 at 05:07 PM..
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Old 09-16-2016, 04:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
Those numbers are correct, and thats just regional rail.
OK, so where are the 14 rail lines for Philly?

SEPTA has like 7 lines, they just count them twice, rather than once, as with most transit routes in the world.

And not even one SEPTA line has equivalent service to Washington Metro. One of the routes has like two trains and a few dozen riders a day.

The entire SEPTA regional rail system combined has fewer riders than just one Washington Metro line. It's a good service, but you can't realistically say it's a better system than Washington Metro. I take it all the time, and it's very low frequency service, small trains with low capacity (almost more like a bus route) and moderate ridership outside of rush hour.
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Old 09-16-2016, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
NYC is, of course, heads and shoulders above all the rest.

The remaining are the usual suspects, and all of these transit systems have their shortcomings in one way or another:

Chicago
DC
Boston
Philly
SF
LA (hesitate somewhat to add, but they have a very useful and extremely extensive bus system, but an extremely underutilized subway system)
LA really seems to be trying to improve, with expansion of their subway/light rail lines to other parts of the LA area. I know they just opened a western line that goes to Santa Monica, and there's talk about expanding one of those lines to connect to the LAX airport.

Chicago's is decent, but the problem is that bus service in the suburbs is often lacking to get to places. Also there isn't any interconnectivity with 'L subway lines except for north side lines, and ditto with Metra(suburban commuter rail) other than in a handful of places(i.e. Blue Island, Joliet, Prairie Crossing which connects the Antioch and Fox Lake lines, River Grove between Elgin and Antioch). The STAR Line was proposed for Metra which would've been a commuter rail line providing for connections on a circular route going through suburbs(the ex-EJ&E railroad, going through Lake Bluff, Barrington, West Chicago, Plainfield, Joliet, and also Chicago Heights), but it seems like it isn't going to occur sadly due to lack of funds.
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Old 09-16-2016, 08:14 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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Originally Posted by killakoolaide View Post
Metro must have an endless pit of cash, because how do you have a ton of maintenance issues and exand at the same time?
The Maryland Purple line will not be operated by WMATA, it is going to be operated by the Maryland Transit Authority (MTA). Those agencies have no relation whatsoever. There will be Purple Line connections to Metro stations with short walks in between.

Home - Maryland Purple Line

Also WMATA doesn't have any dedicated funding source beyond the federal gov and whichever local agencies pony up the money. The Silver Line Phase 2 is already under construction and is being funded primarily by the cost in tolls along the Dulles Toll Road in Virginia. This project was planned and budgeted for almost a decade ago before many of Metro's new woes.
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Old 09-17-2016, 09:26 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,674 posts, read 28,720,526 times
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London, hands down. Oh wait, you want in the USA. That would be San Francisco.
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