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Old 09-18-2016, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
560 posts, read 538,176 times
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I feel like this kind of thread has been done ad infinitum. And I don't think anyone would say that Charlotte, Dallas, Indy etc. aren't great cities. Thing is, being a big city does not necessarily make you immune from being Anywhere, USA™. If a place has a large airport; tons of entertainment options; national sports; national restaurant chains, whether prestige chains or not; big glass buildings and highrises, etc. it will most certainly have appeal, but how many cities have those things? It's not terribly unique. But again, many of these so-called "generic" cities are great places to live with jobs, good things going on and lots of amenities. People might describe New Orleans, Las Vegas, Memphis and Miami as incredibly unique, but not everyone is going to want to live there.

 
Old 09-18-2016, 05:04 PM
 
163 posts, read 106,258 times
Reputation: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquest1 View Post
I feel like this kind of thread has been done ad infinitum. And I don't think anyone would say that Charlotte, Dallas, Indy etc. aren't great cities. Thing is, being a big city does not necessarily make you immune from being Anywhere, USA™. If a place has a large airport; tons of entertainment options; national sports; national restaurant chains, whether prestige chains or not; big glass buildings and highrises, etc. it will most certainly have appeal, but how many cities have those things? It's not terribly unique. But again, many of these so-called "generic" cities are great places to live with jobs, good things going on and lots of amenities. People might describe New Orleans, Las Vegas, Memphis and Miami as incredibly unique, but not everyone is going to want to live there.
Uniqueness is determined more by the actual vibe those aspects put forth in their respective cities, which culminates to the unique "whole."

For example, entertainment options; the nightlife that plays out in LA is of different demographic, character and experience than the nightlife in Chicago. Big glass buildings: different shapes for different cities, and different uses between them (office, condo, or hotel).
 
Old 09-18-2016, 05:32 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,812 posts, read 12,316,247 times
Reputation: 4765
Probably I would say Columbus, Ohio, though there's absolutely nothing wrong with the place and its rather pleasant for a major city.

But I don't know of a distinct Columbus accent, or a specific local food, etc. While the population is diverse, its not known for a specific dominant culture like Hispanic culture in Miami or black culture in Detroit.

People mention Baltimore as an average city but it has a unique cuisine with the crabcakes and Natty Boh, the Baltimore "hon" thing too. Atlanta, as overrun as it is with transplants, still has a Southern feel with the Southern accent still present, along with the rich Southern cooking.

Besides Columbus I might add Orlando, which lacks the Southern culture that North Florida has and is mostly transplants. I would imagine Pittsburgh to be a very bland city too.
 
Old 09-18-2016, 05:33 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,812 posts, read 12,316,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Qwan View Post
I think Dallas wins for most generic big city, but Shreveport has to win for medium.
Shreveport is a Southern city with the accents, food, music and culture. That alone sets it apart from generic American.
 
Old 09-18-2016, 05:43 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,812 posts, read 12,316,247 times
Reputation: 4765
I don't see how anyone can say Dallas is the most generic city. Texas itself is unique in the US and there is a unique feel to it. Plus the Texan culture is very prevalent despite the transplants. The kinds of food one can get in Texas is another very different aspect.

I nominated Columbus and Orlando as the most generic cities. As for places I haven't been to, I picture Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, and anything in upstate New York to be very generic.
 
Old 09-18-2016, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,568 posts, read 12,663,611 times
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Raleigh, North Carolina
 
Old 09-18-2016, 06:33 PM
 
Location: London, NYC, DC
1,118 posts, read 1,970,101 times
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My answer for this is always Columbus. It's Midwestern and has a lot of quintessential and archetypal characteristics of the US, but it's not decaying and has never suffered the same decline as a lot of nearby Rust Belt cities and therefore feels healthier and more "normal" rather than part of the Rust Belt, which has distinct cultural and economic chsracteristics.
 
Old 09-18-2016, 07:55 PM
 
1,826 posts, read 1,248,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inphosphere View Post
Dallas is lit up like Tron at night, it isn't that generic.
True, Dallas does have a relatively iconic and identifiable skyline. Not on the level of London or Shanghai but still more so than many other American cities.

I have to agree that about Shreveport not being very generic. It screamed southern/Gulf.
 
Old 09-18-2016, 09:21 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Take Fort Worth outta the picture and the Metroplex is definitely about as generic as it gets.
There are non-generic/unique areas such as the Deep Ellum, West End, Lower Greenville, Oak Cliff neighborhoods in Dallas and the historic downtown areas of McKinney and Grapevine. But overall the Metroplex is very generic.
 
Old 09-18-2016, 09:22 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
Reputation: 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I nominated Columbus and Orlando as the most generic cities. As for places I haven't been to, I picture Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, and anything in upstate New York to be very generic.
I have to laugh at this one. Pittsburgh is definitely not generic! The accent, topography, history, food, etc. makes it stand out like a sore thumb, which is a good thing IMO.
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