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Old 09-19-2016, 09:10 AM
 
345 posts, read 335,412 times
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Yes, Dallas has unique aspects like illuminated skyscrapers, but for the most part, it's pretty generic. I'd add Indy, Columbus, and Charlotte too.

 
Old 09-19-2016, 09:11 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boulevardofdef View Post
Chicago's North Shore is used in films to represent an idealized suburbia -- what the viewer would wish a generic suburb to look like.
I agree with this. There seems to be a common theme throughout many of John Hughes's movies.

The movie Office Space really highlights the generic blandness of corporate suburban DFW, although many shots were taken outside of the Austin area.
 
Old 09-19-2016, 10:27 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
8,942 posts, read 4,095,428 times
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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Oklahoma City. As generic as places like DFW, Indianapolis, and Charlotte are, OKC is much, much more generic.
 
Old 09-19-2016, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,568 posts, read 12,663,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
I have to laugh at this one. Pittsburgh is definitely not generic! The accent, topography, history, food, etc. makes it stand out like a sore thumb, which is a good thing IMO.
Agreed. Pittsburgh is very unique looking. Very few other cities have those hills and amazing views. And like you said, the people and food are unique, too. It's a very cool city to visit!
 
Old 09-19-2016, 10:35 AM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,673,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
From a foreign point of view: Kansas City, Houston, Atlanta, St Louis those are all "typical" american cities for us foreigners
Not at all. Houston is one of the most diverse cities & metros in the nation, Atlanta has a unique and very well-marketed culture, and St. Louis has a historic heritage and built form unlike any other. Kansas City, you could maybe make an argument for, but its built form and aesthetics, history and cultural offerings, and food scene (read: BBQ) are enough to set it apart IMO.
 
Old 09-19-2016, 10:36 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michgc View Post
Agreed. Pittsburgh is very unique looking. Very few other cities have those hills and amazing views. And like you said, the people and food are unique, too. It's a very cool city to visit!
The layout of a city can really distinguish it from others. Heck, even in Dallas we don't have the perfect "generic" grid pattern that you'd see in Austin and Houston.
 
Old 09-19-2016, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Boston
432 posts, read 355,981 times
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Indy, Charlotte, Dallas, Houston, Chicago suburbs, OKC, Jacksonville, and just about every Ohio city.
 
Old 09-19-2016, 10:45 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,219 posts, read 19,521,254 times
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Purely based on perception, I think Kansas City comes the closest to being the most generic city in America.

The image that comes to mind is Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz. Smallville and hometown America. Not necessarily a bad thing though. Sometimes, you need to get back to the basics.
 
Old 09-19-2016, 11:49 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
8,942 posts, read 4,095,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Purely based on perception, I think Kansas City comes the closest to being the most generic city in America.

The image that comes to mind is Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz. Smallville and hometown America. Not necessarily a bad thing though. Sometimes, you need to get back to the basics.
Oklahoma City really is what most Americans think Kansas City is. Kansas City is actually a fairly vibrant, midsized midwestern city that compares well with places like Indianapolis or Columbus. It isn't the small town people think it is.

Oklahoma City on the other hand is exactly that.
 
Old 09-19-2016, 11:58 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Oklahoma City really is what most Americans think Kansas City is. Kansas City is actually a fairly vibrant, midsized midwestern city that compares well with places like Indianapolis or Columbus. It isn't the small town people think it is.

Oklahoma City on the other hand is exactly that.
I thought OKC was similar to Fort Worth in a way?
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