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Old 09-19-2016, 02:17 PM
 
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What suburbs do you think typify the ideal American suburb?

While I personally prefer dense, walkable suburbs, I recognize that their form is more urban area outside of city center, than truly SUBurban. As far as those suburbs which are truly suburban in form, I think I'm partial to Chicagoland and NoVA . I think Schaumburg, IL is probably the template for Anyburb, USA
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Old 09-19-2016, 02:31 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
What suburbs do you think typify the ideal American suburb?

While I personally prefer dense, walkable suburbs, I recognize that their form is more urban area outside of city center, than truly SUBurban. As far as those suburbs which are truly suburban in form, I think I'm partial to Chicagoland and NoVA . I think Schaumburg, IL is probably the template for Anyburb, USA
I totally agree with your choices, particularly the Chicagoland suburbs. I love them. I like a suburb with a small central commercial area that retains that small town feel. NYC has a gazillion of these as well, of course. When I lived there, it was my dream to move from Brooklyn to Pound Ridge with my husband and three children. But any of those suburbs to the north and NE of NYC would have worked for me. So much beauty up there.
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Old 09-19-2016, 02:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
What suburbs do you think typify the ideal American suburb?

While I personally prefer dense, walkable suburbs, I recognize that their form is more urban area outside of city center, than truly SUBurban. As far as those suburbs which are truly suburban in form, I think I'm partial to Chicagoland and NoVA . I think Schaumburg, IL is probably the template for Anyburb, USA
You'll have to introduce me to the part of Schaumburg that is walkable. The Schaumburg I know is a suburban mid rise office park with a 40 year old upscale shopping center and 10 lane freeways. At around 3800ppsm it is more dense than most suburbs but I wouldn't say it's a gold standard. But in fairness I've never explored it outside of my business travels so I don't know much about what lies past the 1st Half mile off of the Ike.


I think of Royal Oak outside of Detroit. I also think of anything in Hudson County NJ, but that area is more urban than most US cities so I don't know if it would count.
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Old 09-19-2016, 02:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
You'll have to introduce me to the part of Schaumburg that is walkable. The Schaumburg I know is a suburban mid rise office park with a 40 year old upscale shopping center and 10 lane freeways. At around 3800ppsm it is more dense than most suburbs but I wouldn't say it's a gold standard. But in fairness I've never explored it outside of my business travels so I don't know much about what lies past the 1st Half mile off of the Ike.
It isn't walkable at all. Sorry I wasn't clear. My preference is walkable. I'd do Oak Park or Evansville before I did Schaumburg, but Schaumburg is more like the perfect, generic suburban template. I don't mean that as an insult. If I had to live in that sort of burb, I'd be happy in that town.
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Old 09-19-2016, 03:15 PM
 
Location: New York NY
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Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
You'll have to introduce me to the part of Schaumburg that is walkable. The Schaumburg I know is a suburban mid rise office park with a 40 year old upscale shopping center and 10 lane freeways. At around 3800ppsm it is more dense than most suburbs but I wouldn't say it's a gold standard. But in fairness I've never explored it outside of my business travels so I don't know much about what lies past the 1st Half mile off of the Ike.


I think of Royal Oak outside of Detroit. I also think of anything in Hudson County NJ, but that area is more urban than most US cities so I don't know if it would count.
I'd go more for Essex county than Hudson. Essex suburbs are about as typcially suburban as any you'll find. Places like Glen Ridge, Montclair, Essex Fells, South Orange, Maplewood, Millburn, Verona, are all on or very close to suburban commuter lines, are mostly older-well-kept single family homes, have middle- to upper-middle class demographics (and the good public schools that implies), good parks and public amenities, and most have nice walkable centers that aren't dominated by chain stores.
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Old 09-19-2016, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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I enjoy Grandview Heights, Ohio. It has a quality school district, a cute commercial strip, proximity to downtown/the urban core of Columbus yet also has tree lined streets and attractive single family homes.
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Old 09-19-2016, 03:45 PM
 
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There's post-war, small homes, small strip center first ring burbs.

Then there are the 1970s-1980s cul de sac, split-level homes, Mall-centric suburbs (Schaumburg).

Then there are the newer suburbs which re-introduce concepts like walkable retail development and larger homes on smaller lots, sometimes even going back to the early 20th century small setbacks with sidewalks and garage is behind the homes accessible by alleyways.

Finally, there are those suburbs that used to be independent small towns which have been engulfed by larger metro development. These are the ones with a walkable downtown, older housing stock near that downtown and newer sprawl residential development on the outskirts. Think of Naperville, Libertyville.
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Old 09-19-2016, 04:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
There's post-war, small homes, small strip center first ring burbs.

Then there are the 1970s-1980s cul de sac, split-level homes, Mall-centric suburbs (Schaumburg).

Then there are the newer suburbs which re-introduce concepts like walkable retail development and larger homes on smaller lots, sometimes even going back to the early 20th century small setbacks with sidewalks and garage is behind the homes accessible by alleyways.

Finally, there are those suburbs that used to be independent small towns which have been engulfed by larger metro development. These are the ones with a walkable downtown, older housing stock near that downtown and newer sprawl residential development on the outskirts. Think of Naperville, Libertyville.
The latter part of this reminds me of suburban areas in Upstate NY where there is a village and stereotypical suburbia in the same area. Some parts of this area may have older suburbia on a grid, but will also have newer, cul-de-sac and planned community suburbia as well. So, you can find suburban areas/school districts with a range of suburban neighborhoods. Liverpool, North Syracuse, Pittsford, Fairport, New Hartford, Williamsville, Orchard Park and Horseheads are some examples of this.
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Old 09-21-2016, 07:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
What suburbs do you think typify the ideal American suburb?

While I personally prefer dense, walkable suburbs, I recognize that their form is more urban area outside of city center, than truly SUBurban. As far as those suburbs which are truly suburban in form, I think I'm partial to Chicagoland and NoVA . I think Schaumburg, IL is probably the template for Anyburb, USA
Hinsdale, Western Springs, and La Grange illinois, Lexington, MA, Madison, NJ, Birmingham, MI , Winnetka, IL , Evanston, IL
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