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View Poll Results: Most Northern state?
Maine 21 14.09%
Vermont 8 5.37%
New Hampshire 0 0%
Massachusetts 37 24.83%
Rhode Island 0 0%
Connecticut 4 2.68%
New York 29 19.46%
Michigan 3 2.01%
Wisconsin 2 1.34%
Minnesota 41 27.52%
North Dakota 3 2.01%
South Dakota 0 0%
Nebraska 1 0.67%
Voters: 149. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-24-2016, 10:43 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Regarding Minnesota, if you think Minnesota's position on a map (furthest north except Alaska) makes it quintessentially the most Northern state - would not that mean that Florida was quintessentially the most Southern state?

I don't think so!

^^^ Badger makes a good argument for Minnesota for other reasons but I would not go by just the map argument alone for Minnesota.
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Old 09-25-2016, 05:53 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The New England states are quintisentially northern as well, but they're too far east to really capture the greater essence of the North,
Can you expand on this? If New England is "too far east" to be North, why couldn't Minnesota be too far west?

I guess I just don't understand your definition of "essence of the North".
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Old 09-25-2016, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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The first thing that I thought was Maine, but maybe I'm thinking too literally. I always thought of the Northeast to be the most "northern" (culturally) area of the country, more so than the Midwest, but maybe that's just because I'm from the Northeast?
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Old 09-25-2016, 08:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
The first thing that I thought was Maine, but maybe I'm thinking too literally. I always thought of the Northeast to be the most "northern" (culturally) area of the country, more so than the Midwest, but maybe that's just because I'm from the Northeast?
You're gonna have to define culture then.

If Maine is "literally" the Northernmost, does that make Minnesota Canada? You realize Minnesota extends further North?
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Old 09-25-2016, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
You're gonna have to define culture then.

If Maine is "literally" the Northernmost, does that make Minnesota Canada? You realize Minnesota extends further North?
OK... the beliefs, customs, arts, etc., of a particular society, group, place, or time

All I said is that when I think "North" I automatically think Northeast, but that probably has something to do with me being from the Northeast. What is the northern most state in the Northeast?

When I think North, I think more urban, fast-paced, and dense. When I think midwest, I think more rural and slow-paced, and I also kind of associate rural and slow pace with the South. Again this probably is because I am from the Northeast.

I realize that Minnesota is part of the North, but this is just where my mind goes.... sorry, I guess?

Also, the accents of people from the Northeast are a huge part of "northern" culture to me. People from the midwest have more "generic" accents

Again, I'll admit that this is probably somewhat of a bias on my part, being from the Northeast, it's only natural that that's where my mind goes first...

Also, Alaska is the northernmost state of all geographically.

Last edited by That_One_Guy; 09-25-2016 at 08:43 PM..
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Old 09-25-2016, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I disagree on that. The Midwest is different, but its not any less northern. The Upper Midwest is very much northern, in fact the further north you go it starts to look quite different from the bulk of the Midwest, and more similar to Upstate New York or upper New England, with large forests.

I think its silly to think "The North" should only mean the far east side of it.


The Upper Midwest has a unique northern culture, but I believe that most people think of New England when they think of "the North". The Upper Midwest is just that, Midwestern. You could also say the same thing for the PNW. It is part of the North as well, but really quite different from both the Upper Midwest and the Northeast. All three regions are Northern, but when people talk about northerners or Yankees they almost always are referring to the people of the Northeast states. Does it make sense?? NO. Obviously someone from Michigan is just as northern as is someone from Vermont, however people do think of those more eastern places in New England to be more of the true Northern culture.


The same thing could be said for the South, obviously Arizona is quite far south but do we think of it when someone talks about the South? NO. Just like up north it is about culture, and Southern culture exists only east of the plains. The Grand Canyon is as far South as Tennessee and North Carolina but that part of Arizona has absolutely no southern traits. Sometimes these things just don't make sense from a standpoint of geography but they make all kinds of sense when we look at the people and culture.
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Old 09-26-2016, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
The curve is the reason so many people don't get a grasp on many geographical truths that appear to be oddities. Like how Seattle is further than the entire state of Maine. The curve makes it seem as if Maine is the furthest state North. It also makes a lot of the South seem much further North for some odd reason.
It also makes Florida look further east. I grew up in Miami and used to think I was about as far east as NYC. Turns out NYC is further east than the entire South and Miami is slightly further west than Pittsburgh. Also, for folks that think of Pittsburgh should be considered the Midwest... realise its further east than Miami
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Old 09-26-2016, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Regarding Minnesota, if you think Minnesota's position on a map (furthest north except Alaska) makes it quintessentially the most Northern state - would not that mean that Florida was quintessentially the most Southern state?

I don't think so!

^^^ Badger makes a good argument for Minnesota for other reasons but I would not go by just the map argument alone for Minnesota.
One difference map-wise though, is that Florida may be the furthest South in the lower 48 but its geography alone is already too distinct. Once you down to as far as about Lake Okeechobee, you see lots of tropical vegetation that does not thrive or even survive in most of the South. Minnesota doesn't have anything geographic that makes it too exotic within the North. Northern Florida can qualify as "quintisentially Southern" but not the state as a whole. I'm just going on geography but the argument holds true for culture, too. Florida's too coastal and tropical to be quintessential for the South.

In an interesting paradox, Florida is too far south to be a perfect mascot for the South, but Minnesota is not too far north to be a perfect mascot for the North. I could argue though, that it may be to far north to be a perfect mascot for the Midwest. From a purely geographical standpoint, southern Florida is so far south it resembles more of the Caribbean than the majority of the South, and northern Minnesota is so far north it resembles more of Canada than the majority of the Midwest. But at the same time, northern FL and southern MN are perfect geographic representations of their subregions (Deep South/Upper Midwest) The same can be said culturally to an extent.
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Old 09-26-2016, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Can you expand on this? If New England is "too far east" to be North, why couldn't Minnesota be too far west?

I guess I just don't understand your definition of "essence of the North".
Because Minnesota is not really that far west, its right in the middle. The proper equivalent would be more like Washington. Also never said its too far east to be the North, just to be QUINTISENTIALLY.

I'm more referring to a general northern vibe which isn't biased towards the coast, but more so of the setting and lifestyles found in northern states such as, a life adapted around strong seasonal climates with cold winters, a hearty amount of historically industrial cities, and many other factors. One cultural attribute that I notice that lots of northerners (but more upper Midwesterners) is an affinity for going camping or boating on a lake. Owning a cabin "up nort" is a very stereotypical Minnesota thing.

Last edited by BadgerFilms; 09-26-2016 at 01:10 AM..
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Old 09-26-2016, 01:06 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
The Upper Midwest has a unique northern culture, but I believe that most people think of New England when they think of "the North". The Upper Midwest is just that, Midwestern. You could also say the same thing for the PNW. It is part of the North as well, but really quite different from both the Upper Midwest and the Northeast. All three regions are Northern, but when people talk about northerners or Yankees they almost always are referring to the people of the Northeast states. Does it make sense?? NO. Obviously someone from Michigan is just as northern as is someone from Vermont, however people do think of those more eastern places in New England to be more of the true Northern culture.


The same thing could be said for the South, obviously Arizona is quite far south but do we think of it when someone talks about the South? NO. Just like up north it is about culture, and Southern culture exists only east of the plains. The Grand Canyon is as far South as Tennessee and North Carolina but that part of Arizona has absolutely no southern traits. Sometimes these things just don't make sense from a standpoint of geography but they make all kinds of sense when we look at the people and culture.
People on the east coast maybe, but here in Texas, Nebraska comes to mind just as often as New York when we think of the North. The Midwest is also a part of the north, its just the part of the North thats not too far east or west, or on the coasts. Btw I'd argue that the way refer to 'the south' may be mostly influenced by the Civil War/Confederacy. I betcha that if there never was a Civil War, we'd probably consider Arizona as "the South." We'd just break it down between Southeast and Southwest. Which we kinda do already the only difference is that we don't collectively use "The South" to refer to the entire literal South like we do the North. And honestly in my mind, I see no reason not to include the northern mountain states like Colorado, Wyoming and the Pacific Northwest in "The North" along with the Midwest and Northeast. Those states have a good amount in common with their eastern neighbours as well, they're just a little more mountainy and a little more free-spirited

Anyway, I digress. While the Northwestern states may not necessarily get a "Northern" label, the Midwestern states certainly do and I know there's tons of people in Minn. and Mich. who proudly identify as being Northerners. They are more humble and less obnoxious about it than Southerners are about Southern pride, though, and thank God!
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