U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Most Northern state?
Maine 21 14.09%
Vermont 8 5.37%
New Hampshire 0 0%
Massachusetts 37 24.83%
Rhode Island 0 0%
Connecticut 4 2.68%
New York 29 19.46%
Michigan 3 2.01%
Wisconsin 2 1.34%
Minnesota 41 27.52%
North Dakota 3 2.01%
South Dakota 0 0%
Nebraska 1 0.67%
Voters: 149. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-26-2016, 06:40 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,862,654 times
Reputation: 2585

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
OK... the beliefs, customs, arts, etc., of a particular society, group, place, or time

All I said is that when I think "North" I automatically think Northeast, but that probably has something to do with me being from the Northeast. What is the northern most state in the Northeast?

When I think North, I think more urban, fast-paced, and dense. When I think midwest, I think more rural and slow-paced, and I also kind of associate rural and slow pace with the South. Again this probably is because I am from the Northeast.
So to beat represent fast pace, urban, and dense, you pick Maine??? I would think your first thought would be New York. Maine has little to none of that

Quote:
I realize that Minnesota is part of the North, but this is just where my mind goes.... sorry, I guess?

Also, the accents of people from the Northeast are a huge part of "northern" culture to me. People from the midwest have more "generic" accents
Huh? None of the states I listed except Nebraska have a region where General American/Midland accents are spoken. Actually, it can be argued that Western New England accents (the region that is neither Great Lakes nor Eastern New England) are quite generic. Have you not seen Fargo? Minnesota accents are known for being quite distinct and definitely not generic. Newscasters look to either the Lower Midwest (Central Ohio, Indiana, Central Illinois, southern Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska) for their generic non-distinct accents AS WELL as Western New England. Minnesota? Ha. Everyone laughs at the Minnesota accent. I didn't even list any lower Midwest states.

Quote:
Again, I'll admit that this is probably somewhat of a bias on my part, being from the Northeast, it's only natural that that's where my mind goes first...

Also, Alaska is the northernmost state of all geographically.
Sure, but Maine hardly represents any stereotypes of the Northeast, anyway. Where is the density? The fast pace? The urban environment? Most of Maine is not any of that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-26-2016, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,316,963 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
So to beat represent fast pace, urban, and dense, you pick Maine??? I would think your first thought would be New York. Maine has little to none of that



Huh? None of the states I listed except Nebraska have a region where General American/Midland accents are spoken. Actually, it can be argued that Western New England accents (the region that is neither Great Lakes nor Eastern New England) are quite generic. Have you not seen Fargo? Minnesota accents are known for being quite distinct and definitely not generic. Newscasters look to either the Lower Midwest (Central Ohio, Indiana, Central Illinois, southern Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska) for their generic non-distinct accents AS WELL as Western New England. Minnesota? Ha. Everyone laughs at the Minnesota accent. I didn't even list any lower Midwest states.



Sure, but Maine hardly represents any stereotypes of the Northeast, anyway. Where is the density? The fast pace? The urban environment? Most of Maine is not any of that.
No. I never said that Maine was any of that. I said the Northeast in general is and I said Maine was Northeast though. I'll explain what I meant one more time, and I'll break it down in parts:

The Northeast, in general is very urban and dense. The most dense and urban part of the US. Agreed?

OK. Now I said that my mind automatically thinks Northeast when I think North. I admitted that this was probably a bias on my part being from the Northeast, and the Northeast in general being the most different region from the South (IMO).


OK, so now of the Northeast, I was thinking literally north, so I chose Maine. Get it now?

I'm just trying to explain my thought process. I never claimed that Maine was super urban or farther North than Minnesota.

If I'm being completely honest, I don't know or care much for the Midwest, and I'm not familiar at all with the regions you named. Also, Midwestern accents sound pretty generic to me. This is my reasoning for the way I voted. It's my opinion and I explained my reasoning behind it multiple times.


You may disagree with me, and you probably will if you are from the Midwest (you sound like you are), but that's OK!

Hopefully that clears up my thought process.

Last edited by That_One_Guy; 09-26-2016 at 12:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 12:51 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,862,654 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
No. I never said that Maine was any of that. I said the Northeast in general is and I said Maine was Northeast though. I'll explain what I meant one more time, and I'll break it down in parts:

The Northeast, in general is very urban and dense. The most dense and urban part of the US. Agreed?

OK. Now I said that my mind automatically thinks Northeast when I think North. I admitted that this was probably a bias on my part being from the Northeast, and the Northeast in general being the most different region from the South (IMO).


OK, so now of the Northeast, I was thinking literally north, so I chose Maine. Get it now?

I'm just trying to explain my thought process. I never claimed that Maine was super urban or farther North than Minnesota.

If I'm being completely honest, I don't know or care much for the Midwest, and I'm not familiar at all with the regions you named. Also, Midwestern accents sound pretty generic to me. This is my reasoning for the way I voted. It's my opinion and I explained my reasoning behind it multiple times.


You may disagree with me, and you probably will if you are from the Midwest (you sound like you are), but that's OK!

Hopefully that clears up my thought process.
Ok, but on the whole dialect/accent thing, I find it strange that you would think someone from Minnesota doesn't sound distinct. Have you ever heard a thick Minnesota accent?

Kinda how the Northeast has different accents, so does the Midwest. The idea that the entire Midwest all has the same accent is as ridiculous as believing that people from the Northeast all speak the same way, too
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,316,963 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Ok, but on the whole dialect/accent thing, I find it strange that you would think someone from Minnesota doesn't sound distinct. Have you ever heard a thick Minnesota accent?

Kinda how the Northeast has different accents, so does the Midwest. The idea that the entire Midwest all has the same accent is as ridiculous as believing that people from the Northeast all speak the same way, too
It all depends where you're from.

OK, yeah I actually do know somebody from Minnesota. I guess that is very distinct. But the Midwest in general, to me it sounds generic.

I can tell apart New York accents, Philly accent, Jersey accents, Boston accent, etc, but there are probably a lot of people from the South or something that probably think all Northeastern accents sound the same.

I know I definitely can't tell apart different Southern dialects. Someone from Texas and someone from The Carolinas just sound Southern to me. I'm sure they are probably able to tell their dialects apart, but I cannot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,305 posts, read 26,308,417 times
Reputation: 11759
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Can you expand on this? If New England is "too far east" to be North, why couldn't Minnesota be too far west?

I guess I just don't understand your definition of "essence of the North".
He also said he's only been to the "northern" states of the Midwest.

If we're talking about a state that's most representative of "the North," then there almost needs to be an Eastern/Coastal bias by necessity. There are as many people in the Boston, NYC and Philadelphia CSAs as there are in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin combined.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 02:13 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,304,965 times
Reputation: 48877
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Actually, if you look at history, many Northern colleges and universities were founded by religious clergy or had a religious affiliation. Many people may not know that Harvard was founded/named after a minister. Syracuse University was and to a lesser degree now, is affiliated with the Methodist Church. My point is that to use the religious/Christian angle for something being Northern or not doesn't make sense, because history says so.

As for Upstate NY not "liking" NYC, that is not uniform across that portion of the state and is largely in relation to political dominance versus necessarily being against the city itself.

Also, the Appalachians go into MA, NH and VT as well as parts of Canada as well.

1. Many "were" - past tense in important here. Few elite colleges still have ties with the churches that founded them, tend to lean secular and liberal.
Is Harvard a religious school? What about Boston University? Would you call that a "Christian College" as you would, say Liberty University? Yes, 300 years ago, many were founded by some mainstream Protestant church. The ties have been broken. That's why there are all of these complaints about "North East Liberal Intellectuals". There is one evangelical Christian college in Massachusetts. Gordon College. It's fairly moderate. There are also a plethora of well thought of colleges in Massachusetts that never had Christian roots - Brandies (Jewish) Mount Holyoke (secular) Simmons (secular) Clark University (secular) Wellesey College (secular) Hampshire College (secular)

If Tufts was ever connected to any religion, it is not apparent now.


2. Appalachian CULTURE in alive and well in NYS. There are several good documentaries about that. Especially in the SW Tier.

I do not see much if any, Appalachian culture in Massachusetts. I do see evidence of French Canadian Culture.

The question posed was Which state is most quintessentially Northern? My answer remains Massachusetts.

I'd rank Minnesota second. And NYS third. Yes, it has abolitionist roots. But so does Ohio. However, Ohio has many southern cultural traits, especially in Cincinnati and the Southern portion of the state.

The Appalachian Mountains do NOT extend into Canada or New Englandhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachia

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/23/ny...chia.html?_r=0

Last edited by sheena12; 09-26-2016 at 02:32 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 04:21 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,862,654 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
1. Many "were" - past tense in important here. Few elite colleges still have ties with the churches that founded them, tend to lean secular and liberal.
Is Harvard a religious school? What about Boston University? Would you call that a "Christian College" as you would, say Liberty University? Yes, 300 years ago, many were founded by some mainstream Protestant church. The ties have been broken. That's why there are all of these complaints about "North East Liberal Intellectuals". There is one evangelical Christian college in Massachusetts. Gordon College. It's fairly moderate. There are also a plethora of well thought of colleges in Massachusetts that never had Christian roots - Brandies (Jewish) Mount Holyoke (secular) Simmons (secular) Clark University (secular) Wellesey College (secular) Hampshire College (secular)

If Tufts was ever connected to any religion, it is not apparent now.


2. Appalachian CULTURE in alive and well in NYS. There are several good documentaries about that. Especially in the SW Tier.

I do not see much if any, Appalachian culture in Massachusetts. I do see evidence of French Canadian Culture.

The question posed was Which state is most quintessentially Northern? My answer remains Massachusetts.

I'd rank Minnesota second. And NYS third. Yes, it has abolitionist roots. But so does Ohio. However, Ohio has many southern cultural traits, especially in Cincinnati and the Southern portion of the state.

The Appalachian Mountains do NOT extend into Canada or New Englandhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachia

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/23/ny...chia.html?_r=0
What are the Southern cultural traits of Cincinnati and Southern Ohio? Don't say "it borders Kentucky" because I can come back and say Northern Kentucky is Midwest simply by bordering Ohio.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 04:23 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,862,654 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
It all depends where you're from.

OK, yeah I actually do know somebody from Minnesota. I guess that is very distinct. But the Midwest in general, to me it sounds generic.

I can tell apart New York accents, Philly accent, Jersey accents, Boston accent, etc, but there are probably a lot of people from the South or something that probably think all Northeastern accents sound the same.

I know I definitely can't tell apart different Southern dialects. Someone from Texas and someone from The Carolinas just sound Southern to me. I'm sure they are probably able to tell their dialects apart, but I cannot.
You're right the Midwest in general has the reputation of non distinct accents. However I should inform you that none of the states save Nebraska I listed have that accent. One of them shares an accent with the Northeast (Michigan) .

I was talking Minnesota specifically. That accent is so distinct it is confused for Canadian. Hardly "general American".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,094 posts, read 3,410,813 times
Reputation: 7759
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
He also said he's only been to the "northern" states of the Midwest.

If we're talking about a state that's most representative of "the North," then there almost needs to be an Eastern/Coastal bias by necessity. There are as many people in the Boston, NYC and Philadelphia CSAs as there are in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin combined.
Actually, a little correction. What I meant was, the only northern states I've been to, were in the Midwest, not that I've only been to the northern part of the Midwest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2016, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,232,550 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Actually, a little correction. What I meant was, the only northern states I've been to, were in the Midwest, not that I've only been to the northern part of the Midwest.
All Midwestern states are Northern. Some may not have always been, but the Midwest today is unquestionably Northern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top