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View Poll Results: Most Northern state?
Maine 21 14.09%
Vermont 8 5.37%
New Hampshire 0 0%
Massachusetts 37 24.83%
Rhode Island 0 0%
Connecticut 4 2.68%
New York 29 19.46%
Michigan 3 2.01%
Wisconsin 2 1.34%
Minnesota 41 27.52%
North Dakota 3 2.01%
South Dakota 0 0%
Nebraska 1 0.67%
Voters: 149. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-25-2018, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,528 posts, read 706,394 times
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Alaska.
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Old 01-25-2018, 07:24 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,843,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
He might mean cottage culture. Tons of people who are not even particularly wealthy have or regularly rent summer cottages in the same town year after year. These "summer residence" towns are less popular elsewhere. From what ive gathered people outside the Northeast tend to go on singular vacations rather than the same getaway every year, whether it be in the mountains or beach
People do this in the Great Lakes all the time.
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Old 01-25-2018, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,383,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geographybee View Post
No! Native Floridians do not go the beach! At least not in South Florida. Same thing with californians. Northeasterners go to the beach in their respective areas regularly, oftentimes every weekend.

You know I'm from Florida, right? I went to the beach several times every summer. Why the hell would we NOT go to the beach? Honestly the beach is like the only thing that doesn't suck in Florida. Our beaches are awesome. Californians go to the beach too. You don't know what you're talking about.
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Old 01-26-2018, 12:19 AM
 
56,593 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
I keep seeing this and I want clarification. From my limited understanding there is a large Muslim population in Southern Michigan (Kalamazoo) and there is a large Somalian population in Minneapolis. Where else is there a large muslim population up north? Also can someone give a historical context on this?

I do know there is a large Persian population out West in LA, those folks are mainly exiles from the Iranian revolution.

I have read about the Somalian population in Minneapolis. Some of it was due to various charities and word of mouth spread so that the community coalesced.

But I'd like some more explanations of why you claim this statement to be true and some historical context. Otherwise I'll just say this is an urban legend.
Kalamazoo? The Detroit area’s Arab community comes to mind right away. There is decent sized population in the Buffalo area as well.

This doesn’t get into the aspect of Arab Christians as well. You can find Lebanese Maronite communities in places like Utica NY and Waterville ME, among others as well.
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:11 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Definitely not just New England culture if the New York Yankees’ name actually means anything. It’s really supposed to just mean “American” but Southerners changed it to just apply to Northerners. I’m guessing that this happened around the time of the Civil War.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Anyone from up north is a "yankee" that includes the Midwest. Yes I know that word originally referred to folks from New England, but hillbilly originally referred to Appalachian folks and now it's a wider definition.
My guess is that Southerners were calling Northerners "Yankees" sometime before the Civil War.

Actually the word Yankee probably began as insult by the English to the Dutch colonials and other minorities living in the conquered New Netherland (New York, New Jersey, Delaware and the future Pennsylvania). It was later adapted by the British to insult all American colonials, especially in the North. But no one really knows for sure.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yankee#Dutch_origin
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,519 posts, read 7,459,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Anyone from up north is a "yankee" that includes the Midwest. Yes I know that word originally referred to folks from New England, but hillbilly originally referred to Appalachian folks and now it's a wider definition.
My original point was that the upper Midwest is very different from the Northeast. It has always seemed when your talking about “the North” people usually think of brash fast paced urbanites from the Philadelphia, New York and Boston. Yes here in the south everyone who lives north of the Ohio/mason Dixon line is a Yankee. I will say however that I have never heard midwestern people call themselves Yankees, only people in New England and the northeast do that. It seems being a Yankee is a point of pride and regional identity in New England.
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,419,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Kalamazoo? The Detroit area’s Arab community comes to mind right away. There is decent sized population in the Buffalo area as well.

This doesn’t get into the aspect of Arab Christians as well. You can find Lebanese Maronite communities in places like Utica NY and Waterville ME, among others as well.
Do you have any background on why this is? It wouldn't seem to be a natural fit, Muslims in Maine for instance. It would seem like they would only like NYC, Boston, or Philly. Just trying to understand.
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:44 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,843,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
My original point was that the upper Midwest is very different from the Northeast. It has always seemed when your talking about “the North” people usually think of brash fast paced urbanites from the Philadelphia, New York and Boston. Yes here in the south everyone who lives north of the Ohio/mason Dixon line is a Yankee. I will say however that I have never heard midwestern people call themselves Yankees, only people in New England and the northeast do that. It seems being a Yankee is a point of pride and regional identity in New England.
This is such a weird and minority opinion. Irl nobody thinks the Midwest is NOT Yankee. And yes when Midwesterners move down South they realize they are Yankees.

And again...Yankees settled the Midwest. We are the same people. Especially between Great Lakes and New England there really isn't THAT much difference. We are more like each other than people realize. Even the way we think and talk is more similar than different. Your average American couldn't tell apart a Bostonian from a Chicagoan but they could tell someone from Memphis or Houston apart from the other two Northerners. People act like there is some vast difference between Northerners but the reality is the Bostonian and the Chicagoan are probably more similar than someone from Savannah compared to Houston. The North is about as uniform as the South to be honest.

Check this out: https://amp.businessinsider.com/the-...-states-2015-7

^the same people who created Yankee culture created the Midwest essentially

Little bucolic Northeast small towns have their Midwest counterparts. Big Yankee cities exist away from the ocean as well. Let someone go to Cleveland (not even a big city) and tell me how vastly different it is from being in some smaller New England city. The differences are not as pronounced as people think.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,519 posts, read 7,459,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
This is such a weird and minority opinion. Irl nobody thinks the Midwest is NOT Yankee. And yes when Midwesterners move down South they realize they are Yankees.

And again...Yankees settled the Midwest. We are the same people. Especially between Great Lakes and New England there really isn't THAT much difference. We are more like each other than people realize. Even the way we think and talk is more similar than different. Your average American couldn't tell apart a Bostonian from a Chicagoan but they could tell someone from Memphis or Houston apart from the other two Northerners. People act like there is some vast difference between Northerners but the reality is the Bostonian and the Chicagoan are probably more similar than someone from Savannah compared to Houston. The North is about as uniform as the South to be honest.

Check this out: https://amp.businessinsider.com/the-...-states-2015-7

^the same people who created Yankee culture created the Midwest essentially

Little bucolic Northeast small towns have their Midwest counterparts. Big Yankee cities exist away from the ocean as well. Let someone go to Cleveland (not even a big city) and tell me how vastly different it is from being in some smaller New England city. The differences are not as pronounced as people think.
You are right about who settled the Midwest, clearly New England and New York folks are the original settlers in many upper Midwest states. (In some places small numbers of French were the original settlers) However true that may be you are discounting or unaware of a more influential part of the development of the Midwest, the massive influx of German and Scandinavian immigrants to that region in the mid 19th century. Those immigrants overwhelmed the small group of northeastern people who settled the place in short order since they arrived in much larger numbers. The culture, people and accent of the Midwest is the result of these German and Scandinavian immigrants, the Yankee culture of those original settlers long extinguished in all ways but the remaining place names they brought to the region. There is a reason some of the best beer in the nation can still be found in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan and that is thanks to its Germanic heritage. Also one needs to look no further than the last names of many people who live in that region to see that I am correct.

Another group to consider in the Midwest is the 20th century southerners who migrated to Midwestern cities like Detroit and Chicago. Hard to forget or ignore thier influences either, as in some places they moved in such large numbers that most people in metros like Detroit have some connection to the South. It’s hard not to noticed that the industrial cities in the Midwest are a bit different than the surrounding rural areas and this is a possible explanation why.

I’m not sure why you think my opinion is “weird or minority” when you look at the reality of German immigration in the Midwest being absolute historical fact. I believe it is also true that the Midwest is different and distinct from the northeast in a way that makes it hard to identify the North in a cultural sense the way people do with the South. Outside of the division of civil war era America you will find little uniting the Midwest and the northeast.

Also I have lived in Michigan before and I have traveled around this nation extensively. My opinions on this matter are based on my experiences in both regions and from my knowledge of history.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Alaska
2,790 posts, read 2,509,054 times
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Originally Posted by Jjmars View Post
Most Midwestern states aren't northern. Missouri for one has quite a southern feel. There's not much distinction in the lower half of Missouri and its border with Arkansas.
Why did you not offer Pennsylvania and New Jersey as choices?
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