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View Poll Results: Most Northern state?
Maine 21 14.09%
Vermont 8 5.37%
New Hampshire 0 0%
Massachusetts 37 24.83%
Rhode Island 0 0%
Connecticut 4 2.68%
New York 29 19.46%
Michigan 3 2.01%
Wisconsin 2 1.34%
Minnesota 41 27.52%
North Dakota 3 2.01%
South Dakota 0 0%
Nebraska 1 0.67%
Voters: 149. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-03-2018, 05:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I excluded Jersey the same I reason I excluded Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and other states.

These states may be in "the North" collectively, but if they border Southern states or even "border" states I can't possibly imagine how they could be representative of the North fully. Basically I excluded states at latitudes that are too far South. Some of these states are latitudinally in line with places in the south so it made no sense to include.
That was a mistake on your part to exclude NJ. Even if it isnít latitudially the most Northern, it culturally is. Florida is the most Southern state, but nobody would say that Florida is the most culturally southern state. If you include New York, you have to include New Jersey (and PA). Just read an above posterís comments about New Jersey. To many people, it does not get more Northern culturally than NJ.
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Old 02-03-2018, 05:26 AM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,529,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geographybee View Post
That was a mistake on your part to exclude NJ. Even if it isnít latitudially the most Northern, it culturally is. Florida is the most Southern state, but nobody would say that Florida is the most culturally southern state. If you include New York, you have to include New Jersey (and PA). Just read an above posterís comments about New Jersey. To many people, it does not get more Northern culturally than NJ.
New England has always been the counterweight to the Deep South historically, and still is today (just look at where the liberal lions come from) New England is the heart of the North. I would pick MA or RI just because they're more representative than a state like ME.
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Old 02-03-2018, 06:02 AM
 
240 posts, read 117,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
New England has always been the counterweight to the Deep South historically, and still is today (just look at where the liberal lions come from) New England is the heart of the North. I would pick MA or RI just because they're more representative than a state like ME.
I completely agree that New England is the heart of the North, but that does not mean NJ and NY are more culturally Southern. NY, NJ, and CT have a distinct NYC culture that is a Northern subculture. It could arguably be the most Northern culture, in terms of politics, accents, and way of life.
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Old 02-03-2018, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,370 posts, read 10,062,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Are you aware that NY is an agricultural state? There are more farms in NY than in all of New England plus Jersey combined.

Most of upstate NY is more like PA than it is New Jersey. Where I live in NY is so far from NYC that its influence is limited to down-staters who visit in the summer, and so far from New England that the connection is still limited to tourists.

Sounds like you don't know much about NY outside of famous assumptions. Which, unfortunately, seems to be a rampant form of misunderstanding in this country.

Politically and culturally you'd be surprised at how many New Englanders think upstate NY is "backwards" when they come here.

If you were to ask me what New York and West Virginia have in common, I would tell you it's the overwhelming ignorance America has about what they are really like. Throw California into that pile as well, actually.
Oh my, you act like you are offended by my choice. Just a quick process of why I chose Connecticut over the rest and certainly nothing academic or scholarly or worth making a point over.

The fact is your state, as completely different as the rest of NY state may be, is forever indelibly marked as the home of the world's capital city. For better or worse NYC overshadows the rest of your state. It has so many things that make it atypical of the American experience and quintessentially American at the same time that it kind of made me throw the state out of the mix.

If the subject had been "what is the most Midwestern state" I would probably go with any of them besides Illinois because Chicago so completely defines the perception of what Illinois is, even tho the remainder of Illinois is probably a good candidate as the prime example of what a Midwestern state is.

Would say the same thing about "Most Southern state." My beloved home state of Georgia would probably fall behind an Alabama or Mississippi or South Carolina because of the overwhelming presence of Atlanta.

I don't think anything I said refutes any point you make. As a REGION the Midwest is known for agriculture. Historically so and into the present age. Of course agriculture is why the whole country came into existence. People grow things and have farms in every corner of the country. Every state has some product they produce commercially as well. But some places are known for it and when making a quick judgment in a parlor game as this, don't be so offended that someone doesn't recognize that New York state has farms and agriculture is important. But it isn't what one thinks of first and foremost in a (what I thought to be) interesting little discussion of people's view points. Chill please.
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Old 02-03-2018, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,370 posts, read 10,062,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geographybee View Post
That was a mistake on your part to exclude NJ. Even if it isnít latitudially the most Northern, it culturally is. Florida is the most Southern state, but nobody would say that Florida is the most culturally southern state. If you include New York, you have to include New Jersey (and PA). Just read an above posterís comments about New Jersey. To many people, it does not get more Northern culturally than NJ.
I agree and in my little synopsis why I chose Connecticut it kind of boiled down to NJ and CT. Didn't even notice that NJ wasn't listed in the mix of states to choose.
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Old 02-03-2018, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
My original point was that the upper Midwest is very different from the Northeast. It has always seemed when your talking about ďthe NorthĒ people usually think of brash fast paced urbanites from the Philadelphia, New York and Boston. Yes here in the south everyone who lives north of the Ohio/mason Dixon line is a Yankee. I will say however that I have never heard midwestern people call themselves Yankees, only people in New England and the northeast do that. It seems being a Yankee is a point of pride and regional identity in New England.
Midwesterners might not call themselves "Yankees" but southerners do. There's a country song by a Texas singer who refers to living in Kansas City as "Living in an ocean full of yankees" lol. New Englanders just use "yankee" differently. The word "yankee" has many meanings, if you know the old expression. To the world, it means American, to America it means a northerner, to a northerner it means a northeasterner, to the northeast it means a New Englander, in New Englander it means a Vermonter and in Vermont it means someone who taps maple syrup!

Btw I hear that the Upper Midwest is the region most similar to New England in geography and culture, outside the Northeast and I can see it (we tap maple syrup up here too, to boot!) Don't think we are all that different and to my ears, all northern accents are connected. There's quite a difference between a Fargo and Boston accent but there's similarities that tie them together that make them "northern".
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Old 02-03-2018, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by geographybee View Post
You may have, but most Floridians do not go to the beach. The people I know in Florida maybe go two or three times a year when they could literally go any day. I know many people in Florida who never go to the beach. They choose not to. Californians are the same way. Maybe they go once during the summer, but they could go in the winter (in SoCal). They choose not to. It is not a bad thing, just the truth.

Those people are lame. Obviously Floridians don't go "any day" people have to work, have school, have responsibilities, may not have means to get there conveniently etc. But you are a plum fool to think a lot of Floridians don't go to the beach. Most? Maybe you are right, not most but a lot of Floridians also live in cities like Orlando or Tallahassee so obviously THEY wouldn't go often.

In the summer we would go several times a year to the beach (me and my family, I haven't lived there in years I don't keep tabs on how often they go now) we would swim, make sandcastles, fish, rent paddle boats, grill, have picnics, collect seashells. Some of my favourite summer time memories are stopping at Publix, grabbing a big bottle of sprite, some fried chicken from the deli, a huge bag of Doritos, filling up the cooler with ice and drinks and heading on down to the lighthouse beach (Bill Baggs) I actually didn't go to Miami Beach often as a kid, Cape Florida is much more family friendly and scenic. You are telling me that my family is in the minority? Why would anyone live in such an overbuilt swamp and not take advantage of it's #1. amenity? Laaame. You must know some squares, my friend lol. Lemme guess, "they dont like the sand." -.-

Don't even get me started on how many Floridians own boats or have friends with boats. You generally have to go the beach to use the boat or at least a waterway that leads to the ocean and for sake of argument, going to the ocean counts. Lemme tell you as much as I don't like Florida, I love the beach. The beach is the one thing I would miss if all my family was to leave the state. Pretty much the only thing, in all honesty.
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Old 02-03-2018, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Yes but this discussion has been somewhat about what is culturally northern. Wi, Mi, and Mn are geographically far north but they are culturally very Midwestern. It’s similar to the argument about Florida and the South. Florida is geographically southern but not culturally southern. Northern culture is typically deemed to be Yankee northeastern in nature. The Midwest does not fit the bill. Funny no one has brought up the PNW or Alaska.seems no one sees those far northern places as quintessential northern either. Proof that this argument is about culture and not geography.
Our whole thing here for the Super Bowl is "Bold North" 100% of Minnesotans consider this THE NORTH. Culturally, how is it NOT northern? We love hockey and winter sports, we go ice fishing, people got funny accents, they call soda/coke "pop," people are generally very liberal, the cities have an industrial spirit to them though they aren't rust belt, there's a drinking culture that's aligned with the other northern states. It's the North, dude. What you consider northern traits are more NORTHEASTERN traits. Minnesota is just northern all around. The more you are like Canada the more northern in vibe. I also think Washington is very northern, for the record. Accents even have similarities to Minnesota's. And furthermore on that point, Florida is more culturally southern than given credit. Miami has more in common with Houston and New Orleans especially in urban youth culture than with Philadelphia or Chicago. Florida hip hop is of the "Dirty South" variety. It's not all "yeehaw" southern (though much of the state is as well) but it's more "Rick Ross/Ludacris/Li'l Wayne/Li'l Jon/old school Pitbull" southern. This was really evident when I was a teenager in the 2000s. I had a cousin who was really into hip hop culture and her friends all spoke with that mix of southern slang with a Latin twist.
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Old 02-03-2018, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,370 posts, read 10,062,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Midwesterners might not call themselves "Yankees" but southerners do. There's a country song by a Texas singer who refers to living in Kansas City as "Living in an ocean full of yankees" lol. New Englanders just use "yankee" differently. The word "yankee" has many meanings, if you know the old expression. To the world, it means American, to America it means a northerner, to a northerner it means a northeasterner, to the northeast it means a New Englander, in New Englander it means a Vermonter and in Vermont it means someone who taps maple syrup!

Btw I hear that the Upper Midwest is the region most similar to New England in geography and culture, outside the Northeast and I can see it (we tap maple syrup up here too, to boot!) Don't think we are all that different and to my ears, all northern accents are connected. There's quite a difference between a Fargo and Boston accent but there's similarities that tie them together that make them "northern".
Great description of the word Yankee, lol. This Georgia boy lived in England two years and got called a Yank more times than I can count. Trying to explain the Southern American aversion and why I was just called the worst slur that any good ol' boy from the south could possibly be called ended up being akin to a Physics lesson in Chinese, so I stopped trying and just laughed with them.

However, there are a few of us Southerners that understand that Yankeedom is primarily aligned with New England. It's the ones that have never been out of the south that call anyone from Northern Virginia up a Yankee.
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Old 02-03-2018, 11:29 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,131 posts, read 9,898,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
New England has always been the counterweight to the Deep South historically, and still is today (just look at where the liberal lions come from) New England is the heart of the North. I would pick MA or RI just because they're more representative than a state like ME.
The problem is the word the OP chose Quintessential, which as different meanings.

Quintessential - Representing the most perfect or typical example of a quality or class.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/de...quintessential

1. Most perfect (most pure) to me is the most Northern states without any opposing cultural traits, such as the "Deep South" as you suggest. In that case, Minnesota, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine would be the best choices with Wisconsin, Michigan, New York and Massachusetts as runner ups.

Typical example to me, suggests a Northern state that has everything that the North is known for. Such as pine forests, lots of snow, big cities, small towns, white clad churches, stone walls, ocean beaches, rocky shores, lighthouses, Great Lakes shoreline, moose, loons, lots of freshwater lakes and ponds, mountains, numerous ski resorts, covered bridges, dairy farms, apple orchards, lobsters and seafood and perhaps wineries.

The only state that has all that is New York with Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Ohio having most of it.
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