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View Poll Results: Most Northern state?
Maine 21 14.09%
Vermont 8 5.37%
New Hampshire 0 0%
Massachusetts 37 24.83%
Rhode Island 0 0%
Connecticut 4 2.68%
New York 29 19.46%
Michigan 3 2.01%
Wisconsin 2 1.34%
Minnesota 41 27.52%
North Dakota 3 2.01%
South Dakota 0 0%
Nebraska 1 0.67%
Voters: 149. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-04-2018, 06:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
I live in Wisconsin, and I don't see anything here that reminds me of the south. You can paint with your own broad brush, if you wish, but you're painting outside the lines, and looking a little silly, in your efforts to try to convince us, that you know more than most people.
You think that a Union Busting Republican could get elected in Rhode Island or Massachusetts?
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Old 02-04-2018, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzly Addams View Post
Yeah the wind is what gets ya. Today for instance is -3 with no wind, and it's wonderful.
Today hasn't been that bad. The few times I been out today I haven't bothered to bundle up but I've only been out to walk to the store. Last month we had a day with temps like this but way windier and it was horrendously cold outside. Too cold for comfort.
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Old 02-04-2018, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Texas is further South than South Carolina but SC is much more southern than Texas. It's how it is the culture of the North andSouth are defined by the East Coast states and they slowly bleed into "the West" and by the time you get to the West Coast the difference between North and South is very small compared to the East.
Texas is the South AND Southwest and yes SC is more quintisentially southern than Texas but theres nothing unnorthern about Minnesota. Minnesota is pure northern. The north does not equal east coast. The south does not equal east coast.
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Old 02-04-2018, 07:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
College Football, Major Land Grant Universities, Heavily Republicam Rural areas, Strong County Governmemts, Majority Protestant.

Also other than OH there basically wasn't a population in any Midwestern state when the identity of the north was forged.
NY and PA have these things.

Wait, if you are concerned about when the population of the North was forged, why do things like college football matter??
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Old 02-04-2018, 07:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
NY and PA have these things.

Wait, if you are concerned about when the population of the North was forged, why do things like college football matter??
College Football from Dominate Land Grant State Universities are due to the shared history of the Midwestern and Southern States of having basically 0 universities pre-civil War.
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Old 02-04-2018, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
There is a huge difference between the demographic makeup of Massachusetts and Minnesota. They aren't the same peoples. Largely Northern Europeans settled in Minnesota and largely Southern Europeans and Irish settled in New England.

The difference between Texas and the Deep South has everything to do with Climate, it was totally unsuitable for large scale plantation agriculture like further east so it developed differently.
You must've never been to Saint Paul then because we got tons of people of Irish and Italian ancestry especially in my neighbourhood. Who cares where people's ancestors came from? I swear people love to over blow that crap on CD. Doesn't matter. Not in the way of "their cultures don't matter" but that "it doesn't change a damn thing." Yes, MN is largely of northern European heritage, and?? That's just another component of the Northern US identity. Wasn't New Jersey a Swedish colony at one point anyway? Lol. Minnesotans, like Texans (and other northerners and southerners) are of diverse back grounds but they generally assimilate to their regional culture. The culture of Minnesota is very northern. Its not like Massachusetts but duhh! New England is its own thing. We're not on the east coast. But we are in the north and thats indisputable.
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Old 02-04-2018, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geographybee View Post
Italian food is important because it is a stereotype of the North to have good food, especially Italian. Also, the South does not have better food than the Nroth. The North can offer much more variety, and more ethnic cuisines. I agree that Southern food is delicious, but the North has better fine dining, Chinese, and Italian. I understand that there is lots of poverty in the North, but there is way more in the South. There is also way more wealth in the North compared to the South.
The West Coast has better Chinese, not the North, unless we're including Seattle. The NorthEAST has better Italian food but the Northeast is not the entire North. The South has incredible variety, from barbecue to Cajun and Creole, to soul food, to seafood, to comfort food. Also, while I do appreciate "ethnic food" I prefer homegrown food. American food. Made with a mixture of European, African and Native cooking styles and ingredients. Thats why I love Thanksgiving lol. I'd rather go eat some fresh Louisiana style gumbo than overpriced "fine dining."

If I want the best possible Italian food, I ain't gonna find it in New York either, or anywhere in the US, I'll find it in Italy. Same goes with Mexican food, Chinese food, etc. etc. When it comes to food that's born and bred in the US, the South wins.
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Old 02-04-2018, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
People keep saying pine trees so I have to make a small correction. It's more about spruce and fir than pine.

The south has entire pine-dominant forests (Carolina pine is extremely common). Oftentimes though, when people think "pine" they are actually thinking about spruce and/or fir.

The "Christmas tree" shape is more common in spruce and fir trees than it is proper pines. This is far more dominant in northern and midland forests, especially as you approach and travel northwards in Canada (West Virginia makes an exception here due to its similar climate to the inner northeastern US).

Pines, on the flip side, come in a wild variety of shapes. Some to the point where the un-trained eye may mistake it for another sort of tree entirely. Most pines are actually not "Christmas" shaped (long pointed cones, if you will).

This last bit I am not entirely sure about, but I think pines are the most populous tree species on Earth.

I do know that there's a botanical difference between pine/spruce/firs but I tend to call them all "pines" as a catchall word. I do the same by referring to "pumpkins" as vegetables even though they're technically not. If you wanna get really nitpicky, palm trees aren't "trees." I'm curious though, are these technically pines or firs/spruces?
I refer to them as "pines" anyway, but they look different from the spruces I have identified here. Either way you are right that the south is full of pines (trust me, I've driven between east Texas and north Florida plenty of times) but the pines down south look very different.
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Old 02-04-2018, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,729,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
You think that a Union Busting Republican could get elected in Rhode Island or Massachusetts?
Maybe not today, but 50 years ago? Sure. Unless you mean to say that history is not a factor here and RI/MA are literally the whole north now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I do know that there's a botanical difference between pine/spruce/firs but I tend to call them all "pines" as a catchall word. I do the same by referring to "pumpkins" as vegetables even though they're technically not. If you wanna get really nitpicky, palm trees aren't "trees." I'm curious though, are these technically pines or firs/spruces?
I refer to them as "pines" anyway, but they look different from the spruces I have identified here. Either way you are right that the south is full of pines (trust me, I've driven between east Texas and north Florida plenty of times) but the pines down south look very different.
That is actually an excellent question! I'll have to look into it. I doubt it, but they may still be related in some way. [EDIT] After posting this reply your inserted image loaded in for the first time. Which changed the question entirely, so please disregard the above in relation to palms. haha

As for colloquialisms I am aware, I just have the evidently obnoxious habit of throwing out the hard-line facts.
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Old 02-04-2018, 08:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
College Football from Dominate Land Grant State Universities are due to the shared history of the Midwestern and Southern States of having basically 0 universities pre-civil War.
So you actually believe that the Midwest and the South have more in common than the Midwest and the Northeast?
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