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View Poll Results: With which region is the Midwest more alike?
Northeast (New England, Mid-Atlantic) 11 31.43%
Great Plains 24 68.57%
Voters: 35. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-23-2016, 12:08 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Which region is the Midwest more like: the northeast or the Great Plains?

Culturally, I'm thinking of areas that are not "southern" in the sense that they were ever slave states.

So I will, for purpose of definition, I am listing the following states as Midwest (all but one on the Great Lakes): MN, IA, WI, IL, IN, MI, OH

for the Great Plains, I'm including: ND, SD, NE, KS, OK

and the northeast would be a combo of the Mid-Atlantic and New England: ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA

I'm pretty much thinking across the board on this: urbanization, culture, life style, politics, climate, topography, demographics, etc.
Maybe it sort of depends.

I am thinking that for Minnesota the northern forested area is more like the Northeast while the southern farming areas are more like the plains.

For Iowa, mostly like the plains.

For Wisconsin, more the Northeast. Forests, lakes, Milwaukee and even the farming areas that are dairy.

Illinois - much of rural Illinois says hello to the Great Plains but the important exception is Chicagoland which is more like the Northeast in some ways. Illinois is like 2 states in one.

Indiana - rural areas more like the Plains but with some exceptions such as the southern hill country (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoosier_National_Forest )

Michigan - more like the Northeast (like Wisconsin but even more so)

Ohio - more like the Northeast with the exception of the large western farming areas.
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Old 09-23-2016, 12:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
The Northern half of Missouri is also part of the Cornbelt.
yes
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Old 09-23-2016, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Arch City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Which region is the Midwest more like: the northeast or the Great Plains?

Culturally, I'm thinking of areas that are not "southern" in the sense that they were ever slave states.

So I will, for purpose of definition, I am listing the following states as Midwest (all but one on the Great Lakes): MN, IA, WI, IL, IN, MI, OH

for the Great Plains, I'm including: ND, SD, NE, KS, OK

and the northeast would be a combo of the Mid-Atlantic and New England: ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA

I'm pretty much thinking across the board on this: urbanization, culture, life style, politics, climate, topography, demographics, etc.
Missouri is legitimately part of the Midwest. Slave states make up both the Midwest and Northeast as well as the South and for those regions should be included with the North.
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Old 09-23-2016, 01:57 PM
 
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Quite shocked that this is close. In terms of natural landscapes, much of these places isn't really corn belt compared to the Great Plains. There is much more forest, which is more similar to the northeast, and a significant amount of hills and lake shoreline. Culturally I would say also. The Great Plains states have a total of around 10 million in population, which is about akin to the total population of Chicagoland. The Primary Midwest states OTOH, have a population of 61.5 Million, and while they occupy a lot of land, a significant amount of which is rural, on the urban/rural continuum, they are much more developed with population than the plains are. The plains states most significant city, OKC, would not even crack the Top 10 in the Midwest. Perhaps if were talking cultural values, and only in certain places, the midwest is more like the plains in certain places. But as a general rule, I would say it has more in common all around with the NE.
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Old 09-23-2016, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Maybe it sort of depends.

I am thinking that for Minnesota the northern forested area is more like the Northeast while the southern farming areas are more like the plains.

For Iowa, mostly like the plains.

For Wisconsin, more the Northeast. Forests, lakes, Milwaukee and even the farming areas that are dairy.

Illinois - much of rural Illinois says hello to the Great Plains but the important exception is Chicagoland which is more like the Northeast in some ways. Illinois is like 2 states in one.

Indiana - rural areas more like the Plains but with some exceptions such as the southern hill country (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoosier_National_Forest )

Michigan - more like the Northeast (like Wisconsin but even more so)

Ohio - more like the Northeast with the exception of the large western farming areas.
In my experience, these parts of Illinois, Indiana, and even Iowa that grow corn and soybeans (i.e., the corn belt) aren't really anything like the plains, and these states also have green, rolling, and even forested areas, especially IL and IN.

Really, the plains are the plains, and generally the Midwestern states closer to the Northeast are going to be more "Northeastern like," although all of these states are solidly Midwestern.
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Old 09-23-2016, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Northern United States
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I feel like most people are taking this as a geological/landscape/climate discussion and less of a social/human discussion. I think that the Midwest is both more like the northeast landscape wise and human/social wise. The crop landscape also spills into the Northeast and Wisconsion, Minneasota and Michigan all have lots of forest. The Great Plains landscape is much more western and less developed.

People/City Wise. The Midwest more like the Northeast because of the age and density of cities. Though cities in the Great Plains are also pretty much Midwestern cities, there are many Midwestern cities that are pretty much like Northeastern cities. Cincinnati with the over the Rhine neighborhood is very dense and old. Chicago is defiantly a massive city that could go along with Northeastern cities. Same with St Louis with the dense red brick home construction. Dubuque, Iowa has many Victorian rowhomes along with a mill district similar to cities of the Northeast.

Political, midwestern cities tend to be democrat like Northeastern cities too. Now the rural areas of the Midwest outside of PARTS of Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin tend to be conservative. While even rural areas of the Northeast much of the time are democrat/liberal too.
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Old 09-23-2016, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Missouri is legitimately part of the Midwest. Slave states make up both the Midwest and Northeast as well as the South and for those regions should be included with the North.
A lot of people are in denial about slavery being just a "Southern" institution. African Slaves cleared much of the wilderness on the island of Manhattan, people were sold on Wall St., New York abolished slavery less than 40 years before the Civil War. Most of what we understand about the Civil War, slavery, and the culture of American history, tries to make the North look morally superior to the South when it came to issues of race. Not true.
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Old 09-24-2016, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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When are people gonna realise the Great Plains are a geophysical region and they intersect with other regions? Kansas is a great plains AND Midwestern state, just like Texas is a great plains AND southern state. It's like asking "Is the South more like Appalachia or the Midwest?"
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Old 09-24-2016, 10:38 AM
 
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A few points, or opinions..

Iowa is not a Plains state, but rather a Prairie state, like Minnesota. Only perhaps extreme NW Minnesota, next to North Dakota, might be referred to as the beginning of the plains, on the northern side.

The line separating the prairie from the plains is not a straight line. One might think that the line appears when the crop changes from corn to wheat ( which requires much less moisture), but even here it's not a consistent border. Nebraska's Corn Belt area extends well into central Nebraska, and even beyond, in some cases, while the western 2/3 of Kansas is largely wheat. Irrigation has something to do with this, but I think that too much of this is tempting fate...IMHO..

I think that the Corn Belt really extends from central/western OH into central Nebraska, and northward to southern Minnesota. and south to northern Missouri. It also includes almost all of Indiana and Illinois ( except southern parts), and all of the state of Iowa. it does creep northward into southern MI and WI, but some of these areas are more known for dairying..

My two cents..
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Old 09-24-2016, 11:10 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
In my experience, these parts of Illinois, Indiana, and even Iowa that grow corn and soybeans (i.e., the corn belt) aren't really anything like the plains, and these states also have green, rolling, and even forested areas, especially IL and IN.

Really, the plains are the plains, and generally the Midwestern states closer to the Northeast are going to be more "Northeastern like," although all of these states are solidly Midwestern.
The reason I see some of these areas, especially IOWA, is not so much the kind of crops that are grown but literally the wall to wall straight line block farmland, plus the relative lack of forests. Totally the opposite of the Northeast. That is why I think Iowa is more like the Plains then the Northeast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States (Forest cover by state)

Take a look at this forest cover map and note Iowa. Colored are the Northern States, Green for Northeast, Blue for Midwest.

1. Maine 85.8%
2.New Hampshire 78.4%
3.West Virginia: 77.2%
4.Vermont: 75.7%
5.Alabama: 70.6%
6.Georgia: 64.2%
7.South Carolina: 63.8%
8.Mississippi: 61.9%
9.Virginia: 60.7%
10.North Carolina: 59.9%
11.Pennsylvania: 55.3%
12.Arkansas: 55.1%
13.Connecticut: 54.7%
14.Tennessee: 52.9%
15.Massachusetts: 52.5%
16.Michigan: 51.2%
17.New York: 50.9%
18.Rhode Island: 50.8%
19.Louisiana: 49.2%
20.Kentucky: 48.6%
21.Wisconsin: 45.2%
22.Florida: 42.4%
23.Washington: 40.7%
24.New Jersey: 39.5%
25.Oregon: 38.8%
26.Maryland: 37.9%
27.Idaho: 31.8%
28.Missouri: 30.3%
29.Delaware: 30.0%
30.Minnesota: 28.9%
31.Ohio: 28.9%
32.Montana: 20.6%
33.Indiana: 18.9%
34.California: 17.8%
35.Colorado: 17.5%
36.Hawaii: 17.0%
37.Oklahoma: 14.2%
38.Illinois: 11.5%
39.Wyoming: 9.2%
40.Utah: 8.9%
41.Texas: 7.0%
42.New Mexico: 5.6%
43.Iowa: 5.4%
44.Arizona: 4.8%
45.Alaska: 3.3%
46.South Dakota: 3.1%
47.Kansas: 2.8%
48.Nebraska: 1.8%
49.North Dakota: 1.0%
50.Nevada: 0.5%
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