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Old 09-28-2016, 08:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterlemonjello View Post
They are Tejano's, not really Mexicans. They have been in San Antonio for so many generations that they are more Texan than anything else. Houston and Dallas are more foreign born Mexican than San Antonio is.
I said WHITE people. As in those of German or Irish descent.

Tejanos are usually ethnically mixed aren't they? Many look indistinguishable from Mexican natives.

Edit: oh I think you meant the Hispanics of SA aren't Mexican but Tejanos. Fair enough. However, isn't it fair to say that Tejanos are still Latinos?
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Old 09-28-2016, 08:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lydunn View Post
ok what is Mexicanish..sorry Ohioan here.
White people there can have Mexican lite accents. Not like Dallas where they sound kinda Midwest and not like Houston where they talk with Southern drawls. In San Antonio even the Whites have taken on a sort of Spanish influenced speech pattern. At least from what I have noticed. Met a Nordic looking lady of German descent and she sounded like a Latina who learned English later in life. Her husband was also a White guy.
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Old 09-28-2016, 10:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
San Antonio is 63.2 percent Hispanic.
http://osd.texas.gov/Resources/Prese...icy_Summit.pdf

I went to a city council meeting there a few years ago and English was the second language - the meeting was conduction in Spanish.

39.5 percent of the Texas population is Hispanic. In fact, up here in northeast Texas I had a "first" happen to me the other day. I went to a funeral and it was in Spanish and English - and though the deceased was not Hispanic, about half the attendees were.

Laredo, TX is 96 percent Hispanic.
McAllen, TX is 91 percent Hispanic.
El Paso is 83 percent.
Pasadena is 62 percent.
Corpus Christi is 60 percent.
Houston is 38 percent.
Dallas and Fort Worth are 29 percent.

Texas is one of four majority-minority states - where white non Hispanics make up less than 50 percent of the total population.
Honestly, I was relying on 2000 numbers for the MSA.
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Old 09-28-2016, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,016 posts, read 643,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
White people there can have Mexican lite accents. Not like Dallas where they sound kinda Midwest and not like Houston where they talk with Southern drawls. In San Antonio even the Whites have taken on a sort of Spanish influenced speech pattern. At least from what I have noticed. Met a Nordic looking lady of German descent and she sounded like a Latina who learned English later in life. Her husband was also a White guy.
Linguistics 101: You speak as to how you're spoken to.

That's the reason why kids who grow up in places like Boca Raton, FL, for example, where 50-60% of the population hails from the Greater NYC area, speak with an accent that displays many of the same features as the NYC/Long Island accent.
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Old 09-29-2016, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Linguistics 101: You speak as to how you're spoken to.
More precisely, your accent is determined by the accents of the kids you grew up alongside, not your parents. Which is why second generation immigrants lose their accents. The only children who tend towards their parents accent rather than peers are on the autism spectrum.
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Old 09-29-2016, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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Las Cruces city, New Mexico 56.7/33.6/100360/17.0
Miami Beach city, Florida 53.5/43.2/90,669/29.9
Kendall CDP, Florida 63.0/44.7/78,580/36.6
The Hammocks CDP, Florida 76.7/31.2/54,833/33.8
Doral city, Florida 79.7/53.7/49,363/54.3
Coral Gables city, Florida 53.8/62.1/49,319/59.4
Cutler Bay town, Florida 51.4/30.3/42,573/27.2
Miami Lakes town, Florida 82.0/31.8/30,396/31.1
The Crossings CDP, Florida 65.5/36.9/24,313/38.4
Glenvar Heights CDP, Florida 67.8/47.1/18,899/39.0

first number: % Hispanic, anything below 50.1% eliminated
second number: % Bachelor's degree or higher (total population), anything below national average eliminated
third number: total population
fourth number: percent of Hispanics with Bachelor's degree or higher, anything below national average is eliminated
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Old 09-29-2016, 07:56 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,851,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
More precisely, your accent is determined by the accents of the kids you grew up alongside, not your parents. Which is why second generation immigrants lose their accents. The only children who tend towards their parents accent rather than peers are on the autism spectrum.
I think a child's accent growing up is affected by more than just their peers. I have noticed that teenagers tend to have their speech evolve into adulthood once they learn "proper" speech patterns necessary for the adult world.

Now I know grammar isn't an accent, but I also know that many of my high school friends have developed a more adult form of speech, and sometimes that involves changing the way you pronounce words, which makes up your accent. I know some high school friends of mine who developed Southern speech patterns during teenage years but by their 30s they have receded and as adults they sound quite Northern, like most adults back home do.
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Old 09-29-2016, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,941,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I think a child's accent growing up is affected by more than just their peers. I have noticed that teenagers tend to have their speech evolve into adulthood once they learn "proper" speech patterns necessary for the adult world.

Now I know grammar isn't an accent, but I also know that many of my high school friends have developed a more adult form of speech, and sometimes that involves changing the way you pronounce words, which makes up your accent. I know some high school friends of mine who developed Southern speech patterns during teenage years but by their 30s they have receded and as adults they sound quite Northern, like most adults back home do.
Older teens and adults can change their spoken tone, but it becomes much harder and takes much longer for most people by around 16 or so. Discounting things like picking up individual slang words when you move somewhere new, it can take adults decades (or longer) to fully shift their vocal patterns. Some people never accomplish it even with professional vocal training.

Last edited by eschaton; 09-29-2016 at 08:45 AM..
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Old 09-29-2016, 08:40 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,851,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Older teens and adults can change their spoken tone, but it becomes much harder and takes much longer for most people by around 16 or so. Discounting things like picking up individual slang words when you move somewhere new, but it can take adults decades (or longer) to fully shift their vocal patterns. Some people never accomplish it even with professional vocal training.
True. I just know that by the teen years, speech is not fully formed. By adulthood it mostly is. People tell me my accent will change from living in the South but honestly I doubt it. I already know what sounds correct in my ears. Any change would largely be contrived.
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Old 09-29-2016, 10:11 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,529 posts, read 17,755,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The only children who tend towards their parents accent rather than peers are on the autism spectrum.
As a guy with one Midwestern parent and one Norwegian parent who grew up in an Italian-American/Jamaican/AA/Puerto Rican neighborhood (i.e. heavily accented) but speaks with a general American accent and curses in Norwegian, I just gotta say, oh snap, I must be autistic!
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