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Old 09-26-2016, 06:21 PM
 
436 posts, read 331,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The Great Lakes Rust Belt cities are far different from the inland cities. They have their own vibe. Northern Ohio and WNY have their own Midwest charming character and a ridiculous amount of activities to choose from.
I agree, they have a different feel. The Great Lakes provide a better sense of culture. The charm of these rust belt cities surpasses those more inland.
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Old 09-27-2016, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,229,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjmars View Post
I agree, they have a different feel. The Great Lakes provide a better sense of culture. The charm of these rust belt cities surpasses those more inland.
I have to disagree especially when it comes to river cities like St. Louis, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh. They have a unique charm to them as well. For example, lots of casinos on the rivers, boating activities, etc. Sure the rivers aren't ocean like compared to the Great Lakes, but they have equally as much to offer. Now for the cities not on major rivers, I agree, there isn't as much charm.
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Old 09-27-2016, 12:36 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,480 posts, read 2,230,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
I have to disagree especially when it comes to river cities like St. Louis, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh. They have a unique charm to them as well. For example, lots of casinos on the rivers, boating activities, etc. Sure the rivers aren't ocean like compared to the Great Lakes, but they have equally as much to offer. Now for the cities not on major rivers, I agree, there isn't as much charm.
St. Louis' connection to the Mississippi River simply isn't comparable to a city like Chicago's connection to Lake Michigan and the Chicago River though.

The riverwalk, which continues to expand, is lined with bars and restaurants, in addition to docks where boats can pull in to use said amenities. There's also plenty of kayakers. As for the lake, you have Navy Pier from which many boat cruises take off, the many harborers for private boaters, and finally all of the beaches that line Chicago's lakefront. Chicago built itself to allow for its public to take full advantage of its lakefront.

That level of connection simply doesn't exist in St. Louis. At best you can go boating on a smaller river away from St. Louis, or even floating on an even smaller river yet. The city itself doesn't highlight the Mississippi in a similar way.

I don't think this necessarily makes the two places culturally all that different overall, but how each city connects to their bodies of water most certainly is quite different.
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Old 09-27-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,773 posts, read 7,706,194 times
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What a lot of people don't get is that people who live in the Rust Belt actually do call their cities part of the Rust Belt, and it's a good thing/point of pride for a lot of them. If you're reading it as a negative thing, you probably don't know what you're talking about. There are all kinds of local companies sprouting up that use the term in their names. It's marketable!
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Old 09-27-2016, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,870 posts, read 2,997,189 times
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Cost of living?
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Old 09-27-2016, 01:27 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,085,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
Affordable and moderately charming suburbs. Hard to find a place like Shaker Heights or Sewickley around Dallas or Atlanta.
I take it you've never been in the Atlanta neighborhoods of Buckhead, Brookhaven, Morningside or Druid Hills.
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Old 09-27-2016, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,229,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
St. Louis' connection to the Mississippi River simply isn't comparable to a city like Chicago's connection to Lake Michigan and the Chicago River though.

The riverwalk, which continues to expand, is lined with bars and restaurants, in addition to docks where boats can pull in to use said amenities. There's also plenty of kayakers. As for the lake, you have Navy Pier from which many boat cruises take off, the many harborers for private boaters, and finally all of the beaches that line Chicago's lakefront. Chicago built itself to allow for its public to take full advantage of its lakefront.

That level of connection simply doesn't exist in St. Louis. At best you can go boating on a smaller river away from St. Louis, or even floating on an even smaller river yet. The city itself doesn't highlight the Mississippi in a similar way.

I don't think this necessarily makes the two places culturally all that different overall, but how each city connects to their bodies of water most certainly is quite different.
Fine you win.
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Old 09-27-2016, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,229,949 times
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The thing I always felt in St. Louis and Cleveland was the spirit you could sense in them of what they were once like back in their heyday. All of the abandoned buildings, factories, and steel mills and vacant railroad tracks, etc. The good news is in both of these cities those vacant factories and buildings in many areas of the city are either being demolished for new buildings or being put to good use as either new offices or loft apartments and many parts of these cities are coming back to life.
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Old 09-27-2016, 01:44 PM
 
15,489 posts, read 7,900,314 times
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I'm from a Rust Belt city - Toledo, OH. I also lived in Detroit a while. I moved back to this area due to the following:

- Affordability, housing is WAY less than other parts of the country
- Wages, ironically, I got a $20K raise to move back near my hometown due to OH being a union state and me working in a field closely associated with the public sector and unions. I worked a similar position in the metro Atlanta area and am paid way more now than I was then
- Down to earth people, I prefer Midwestern Hospitality to Southern Hospitality. I always said (and don't take offense southerners as I did enjoy living in the south) that southern hospitality is being two-faced - lying in your face and stabbing you in the back, or plain just telling "pretty" lies. People are more honest and sometims brutally so in the Rust Belt and I enjoy that - honesty is a good quality IMO.
- Four distinct seasons, I actually enjoy the snow after being away for so long. It is exciting to me (but I'm sure after 5-6 more years it won't be lol)
- Cheaper for family activities, more stuff is free in this area. I don't have to pay to park everywhere. My kids play travel sports and the fees are $200-$500 less for a season here versus in metro Atlanta.
- Less traffic issues, in some Rust Belt cities like Detroit or Cleveland (and especially Chicago) you will have some bad traffic though but there are more side streets/cut throughs versus southern cities which are much more sprawled throughout and lack in side streets/alternate routes.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:08 PM
 
436 posts, read 331,903 times
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St. Louis' connection to the Mississippi isn't the same as a connection to the Great Lakes. St. Louis has done a terrible job maximizing the value of the riverfront. Wouldn't really bring up a casino as a defense for the waterfront; there's a correlation between casinos and higher crime.
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