U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-27-2016, 02:39 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,479 posts, read 2,225,716 times
Reputation: 2353

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjmars View Post
St. Louis' connection to the Mississippi isn't the same as a connection to the Great Lakes. St. Louis has done a terrible job maximizing the value of the riverfront. Wouldn't really bring up a casino as a defense for the waterfront; there's a correlation between casinos and higher crime.
The only casino I can think of off the top of my head in a legitimately bad area in metro St. Louis is the Casino Queen in East St. Louis. No one is running screaming from Four Seasons next to the Lumiere Place Casino in St. Louis proper, much less the Ameristar out in St. Charles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-28-2016, 07:05 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,220 posts, read 17,960,186 times
Reputation: 14658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjmars View Post
St. Louis' connection to the Mississippi isn't the same as a connection to the Great Lakes. St. Louis has done a terrible job maximizing the value of the riverfront. Wouldn't really bring up a casino as a defense for the waterfront; there's a correlation between casinos and higher crime.
There's actually not much that St. Louis can do with its riverfront. The Mississippi River and the Missouri River are unmanageable due to the frequency and severity of flooding. They're each fed by hundreds of tributaries, so a persistent pattern of stormy weather in the northern Great Plains or upper Midwest will eventually cause flooding downriver in St. Louis, even if the weather in St. Louis isn't as stormy. Plain and simple, the Mississippi and Missouri riverfronts are not developable like the Charles, Schuylkill, Potomac, Allegheny, Monongahela, Cuyahoga, Scioto, Des Plaines, Cumberland or Chattahoochee Rivers. Cincinnati and Louisville have the same problem as St. Louis, albeit to a lesser extreme. The Ohio River becomes hard to manage downriver of the Kanawha and Scioto.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2016, 08:27 AM
 
436 posts, read 330,691 times
Reputation: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
The only casino I can think of off the top of my head in a legitimately bad area in metro St. Louis is the Casino Queen in East St. Louis. No one is running screaming from Four Seasons next to the Lumiere Place Casino in St. Louis proper, much less the Ameristar out in St. Charles.
That's good, I only hate legitimately bad crime. All other crime is good with me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2016, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,226,850 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjmars View Post
St. Louis' connection to the Mississippi isn't the same as a connection to the Great Lakes. St. Louis has done a terrible job maximizing the value of the riverfront. Wouldn't really bring up a casino as a defense for the waterfront; there's a correlation between casinos and higher crime.
You have nothing but bad things to say about St. Louis so a statement like this is no surprise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2016, 09:07 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,142 posts, read 23,662,647 times
Reputation: 11622
Rust belt cities generally have a lot of cultural amenities that are holdovers from an earlier age which can't be reproduced now without an incredible investment--this includes performing arts companies, museum collections, research universities and architecture. They often have some pretty great old architecture and some of them feature the old bones of what we now consider desirable walkable neighborhoods. All of this comes with generally a relatively cheap cost of living.

The biggest thing right now is that they're a good value. They're affordable for a lot of what they have and have a strong history and pride behind them which seems like would go with what seems to be either a plateau-ing of the loss they've faced over the last half century. Basically, every major Rust Belt city right now is looking at either a small loss or even a gain in population after a half-century of sometimes double digit population loss. The 2020 census is where we'll be getting an official count on this, but you can see a glimpse of the trend by looking at the previous census counts and the current 2015 ACS estimates, and it's likely that virtually every major Rust Belt city will have stabilized its population at that point with a few posting modest gains. Whether that's an inflection point that signals a growth period remains to be seen, but it's not ridiculous to hope so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2017, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,201 posts, read 10,418,037 times
Reputation: 11214
Quote:
Originally Posted by CampbellGuy View Post
It's like you said.

But I have two reasons why I would find moving to any one of them difficult:

#1: Being from California (or perhaps my genetic makeup?)I cannot tolerate the cold at all (we recently had a 'cold' snap where no day within a month went above 55, and I was seriously thinking about moving to Phoenix even though I have been there in the Summer and hated the heat). This is not a philosophical statement, as in my early years I could walk down the street in a T-shirt in the snow.

#2: I have read reviews from a rival website (which I will not quote, not wanting a Mod to delete anything) that showed that the people in some of them have a kind of mindset that is not welcoming of transplants, cliquish, certain other factors I don't want to mention listed as negatives, corroborated by multiple reviewers.
As someone who made the move from California, #1 definitely is a mindset. You tell yourself you can't live anywhere else because of the weather, then you do and you adjust just like anyone else. Just like all the people who move from the Caribbean, Africa, etc to New York and Chicago and survive...Californians can do it too.

The areas can definitely be cliquish, due to lack of mobility compared to a number of coastal cities, but I disagree with the transplant thing....which is much more common in Seattle, Oregon, and down South where they are seeing large influxes of Californians and East Coasters, and not being too happy about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2017, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,828,129 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Rust belt cities generally have a lot of cultural amenities that are holdovers from an earlier age which can't be reproduced now without an incredible investment--this includes performing arts companies, museum collections, research universities and architecture. They often have some pretty great old architecture and some of them feature the old bones of what we now consider desirable walkable neighborhoods. All of this comes with generally a relatively cheap cost of living.

The biggest thing right now is that they're a good value. They're affordable for a lot of what they have and have a strong history and pride behind them which seems like would go with what seems to be either a plateau-ing of the loss they've faced over the last half century. Basically, every major Rust Belt city right now is looking at either a small loss or even a gain in population after a half-century of sometimes double digit population loss. The 2020 census is where we'll be getting an official count on this, but you can see a glimpse of the trend by looking at the previous census counts and the current 2015 ACS estimates, and it's likely that virtually every major Rust Belt city will have stabilized its population at that point with a few posting modest gains. Whether that's an inflection point that signals a growth period remains to be seen, but it's not ridiculous to hope so.
It's not cheap to live here. The last time Pittsburgh was cheap was back in the 00s. We have a very high COL with high housing costs, an average economy, and high taxes. The affordable title is a Pittsburgh marketing label that the media and CD posters love to overuse. I wish the Ohio border was closer so I could commute.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top