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Old 10-01-2016, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,631,733 times
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[quote=Happiness-is-close;45671323]Surprised Florida isn't on the list. My home town in Florida has been ravaged by the opiate epidemic. Seems to mostly effect young white males.[/QUOTE

There is a high-CPS caseload in Arizona and much of the reason is because of the culture of dependency in Arizona whether it's for these women being in relationships, illicit substances and welfare.

The combination of co-dependency, Narcissism and illicit drug use in interconnected. Codependency results in relationships which leads pregnancies.

Parental substance abuse the main reason kids end up in foster care | Local news | tucson.com

I would venture to guess few if any of these heroin addicts are childless. Usually, they are co-dependent on relationships that are unstable that have resulted in several kids per heroin addict.

It would be interesting if they could have a report on the number of children born to each active heroin-addict. I am sure it would rival the birth rates in third-world countries.

If the rates continue to increase across the country, it will certainly cause an unbelievable strain on the child protective services system.

I am sure since there is no political will to do anything and just ignore this issue until improves that there will many towns and cities that turn into something similar to Espanola, New Mexico on this issue.

http://www.taosnews.com/news/espa-ol...4ab96d21d.html

Last edited by lovecrowds; 10-01-2016 at 04:52 PM..
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Old 10-02-2016, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,511,307 times
Reputation: 1861
[quote=lovecrowds;45677334]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Surprised Florida isn't on the list. My home town in Florida has been ravaged by the opiate epidemic. Seems to mostly effect young white males.[/QUOTE

There is a high-CPS caseload in Arizona and much of the reason is because of the culture of dependency in Arizona whether it's for these women being in relationships, illicit substances and welfare.

The combination of co-dependency, Narcissism and illicit drug use in interconnected. Codependency results in relationships which leads pregnancies.

Parental substance abuse the main reason kids end up in foster care | Local news | tucson.com

I would venture to guess few if any of these heroin addicts are childless. Usually, they are co-dependent on relationships that are unstable that have resulted in several kids per heroin addict.

It would be interesting if they could have a report on the number of children born to each active heroin-addict. I am sure it would rival the birth rates in third-world countries.

If the rates continue to increase across the country, it will certainly cause an unbelievable strain on the child protective services system.

I am sure since there is no political will to do anything and just ignore this issue until improves that there will many towns and cities that turn into something similar to Espanola, New Mexico on this issue.

http://www.taosnews.com/news/espa-ol...4ab96d21d.html
Society will make it. Opioid dependent pregnancy a have been prevalent in our country since at least the 1970s. China has opioid dependency for centuries among its vast population. This isn't a new thing.
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Old 10-02-2016, 02:00 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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looks like West Virginia, then New Hampshire. Both kinda eastern "mountain" states but at opposite ends of social and economic indicators

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Old 10-02-2016, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,383,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
He means the social/government response to this current epidemic is very different than the response to the crack epidemic of the 80's and 90's.
Yeah-mostly because who is profiting from the drug addiction-it is not individuals this time, but whole corporations that own and control our politicians and Governmental agencies like the DEA. Overdose from legal drugs has become the #1 cause of accidental death in the country-surpassing gun deaths and car accidents for the first time in history. Fentanyl, Oxycodone, etc. are patented and sold for profit by nationless corporations. Things like marijuana, heroin, kratom, etc. cannot be patented and controlled in this way.

There is little difference between oxycodone and heroin besides the ability to legally profit off the disease of drug addiction.
Just about all "illegal" drugs have a "legal" counterpart that is owned and controlled by a corporation-although usually less effective. The War on "Drugs" is a complete lie and sham, and it originated as a way to target and institutionalize African Americans (as well as the poor and anti-war activists).

We are going through a drug epidemic worse than all illegal drug epidemics combined-but nothing is being done as these vulture corporations continue to rake in BILLIONS.

When crack was big in the late 80's/early 90's entire communities and families were ripped apart and destroyed by insane prison terms and declarations of war. These areas have never recovered. And expanding the prison population so ridiculously high has had the added "benefit" of inflating economic numbers like the unemployment rate as masses of people are excluded from the stats-and largely removed from society even after release with their civil rights stripped.

Is Social Control the Reason Why Some Drugs are Legal While Others Outlawed?
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Old 10-02-2016, 06:46 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,265 posts, read 6,345,646 times
Reputation: 9056
Just a theory I have: addiction doesn't discriminate on race, income, location, or anything else. Absolutely anyone can get hooked. But recovery discriminates heavily on the basis of class.

The more money the easier it is to get good treatment and more importantly the more someone has something to recover for. Middle class and rich folks also more often have stronger family support.

Obviously that's not 100% true. We can all name rich folks who die from drugs and poor ones that go on to live stellar lives. But generally I've always felt the poor have a much tougher time climbing back than the affluent.
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