U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-30-2016, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Savannah, Georgia
110 posts, read 137,868 times
Reputation: 52

Advertisements

What cities do you think have the best urban structure and design? They don't have to be big cities, but just 100000+. It's easy for small cities and towns to be well planned since they don't have to deal with density and mass transit. Any feedback is appreciated, thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-30-2016, 12:24 PM
 
56,515 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12480
For what it is worth: Buffalo: The Best Designed & Planned City in the United States - Industry Tap

http://www.bestdesignedcity.com


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBsi5FGbY2Y
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 12:47 PM
 
7,693 posts, read 4,554,568 times
Reputation: 8371
Chicago, and it's not really close. Most of the big east coast cities suffer from being products of the colonial era. New York City probably did the best job of growing a grid, but the outer boroughs can still be a mess.

Western and Sunbelt cities just sprawled out of control.

Chicago has pre-automobile density, but it also has the post-fire grid. I believe the city has had little to no annexation after the implementation read, so outlying neighborhoods still adhere to the system.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,958 posts, read 3,816,840 times
Reputation: 3281
I have always been a big fan of cities that have perfectly straight and consistent street grids. Philadelphia, for example, has always visually impressed me by how the square street grid is built around City Hall, which stands in the Center City loop.

Chicago is also quite impressive. It's straight street grid expands out seemingly indefinitely. During America's industrial age, Chicago was the nation's rail center and the dominant Midwestern center for manufacturing and commerce. The city was built to be highly efficient.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 01:00 PM
 
56,515 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12480
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Chicago, and it's not really close. Most of the big east coast cities suffer from being products of the colonial era. New York City probably did the best job of growing a grid, but the outer boroughs can still be a mess.

Western and Sunbelt cities just sprawled out of control.

Chicago has pre-automobile density, but it also has the post-fire grid. I believe the city has had little to no annexation after the implementation read, so outlying neighborhoods still adhere to the system.
I think most Great Lakes cities have a similar situation in terms of a mix of design and minimal to no annexation after say the 1920's or 30's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 01:02 PM
 
7,693 posts, read 4,554,568 times
Reputation: 8371
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post

Chicago is also quite impressive. It's straight street grid expands out seemingly indefinitely. During America's industrial age, Chicago was the nation's rail center and the dominant Midwestern center for manufacturing and commerce. The city was built to be highly efficient.

I don't think people realize just how perfect Chicago's grade is. There is a zero block, and all blocks are uniform in size, and have a numerical assignment, meaning 800 West Anystreet is 8 blocks west of the zero point. Every eight blocks is a mile. If someone gives you an address, you know exactly where it is, that is, if you know the grid. Some old-timers will actually give you the coordinates just to soon as they'll give you the cross-streets, eg 1600 North and 800 West.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 03:42 PM
 
56,515 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12480
More: Study Architecture or Planning in America
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 04:10 PM
 
159 posts, read 168,341 times
Reputation: 105
Baltimore is actually pretty well planned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 04:20 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,263 posts, read 6,343,100 times
Reputation: 9056
How about the original planned city, Washington DC? Four directional quadrants, streets in numeric or alphabetical order, avenues radiating from central points, low density, walkable, and subways (though aging) as well. We may like grids better, but DC is quite well-planned IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2016, 04:50 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18427
Savannah is up there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top