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Old 10-03-2016, 11:41 AM
 
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Looks like in the west, minus the coastal states, Idaho has the most forest lands.

http://www.idahoforests.org/img/pdf/...r_09-13-12.pdf

http://idahoforests.org/

Quote:
Forests cover 40.5% of Idaho


Quote:
http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/ogden/overvi...o/OV_Idaho.htm

At 42 percent (1991) of its total land area, Idaho has the largest proportion of forest land in the Interior West states. Idaho's forests extend from the large, crystal-clear lakes of the Idaho Panhandle, through the rugged central mountains of the Selway-Bitteroot, Frank-Church, and Sawtooth Wilderness areas, past the Snake River plains to the "mountain islands" of Southeastern Idaho. Idaho contains some of the most remote, rugged, and varied forests in the West.
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Old 10-04-2016, 02:39 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
I don't know the history but I believe it has something to do with wildfires. Not a great deal of water or rainfall in the landlocked plains states.
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Much of it was Bur oak savanna, but most of that was cleared for agriculture, just like most of the Longleaf pine forest here in the South was destroyed.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oak_savanna#
Ah I see. Arizona's forests are mostly protected which is why they aren't harmed. Ponderosa pines and all.

This is how I thought the ranking would go down from best to last:

1. Southeast
2. New England
3. Mid-Atlantic
4. Midwest
5. Plains
6. Texas
7. Hawaii
8. Oregon/Washington
9. Intermountain West (not Utah)
10. California
11. Alaska
12. Desert West (with Utah)

with Utah or Nevada being dead last.
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Old 10-04-2016, 04:17 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
I suspect WV may have the most true forests, and by "true forest" I don't mean pine plantations planted by timber companies.
They're all over the place in that region.
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Old 10-05-2016, 08:53 PM
 
44 posts, read 28,942 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Not to me. The Panhandle is virtually free of trees, although there are lots of green grasses. The Gulf Coastal Plain has very few trees and west of San Antonio is virtually treeless past the Hill Country. Drive out through Midland/Odessa or Fort Stockton some time and you'll see what I mean.
The Texas Gulf coast plain will be covered with forest in due geologic time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
I agree with you, 7% does seem kind of low for Texas. That is because the US Dept of Agriculture is looking at timberland. I forget the exact definition of timberland but I think it has something to do with trees that can be harvested. So they actually undercount forests in some states.

This website for Texas (Texas Almanac) Forest Resources | Texas Almanac , says that Texas is 38% forested. Now that number seems too high! Take a look at a satellite view of Texas to see what I mean. Eastern Texas is a mix of farmlands and real forests. Other parts of Texas have open grasslands with trees mixed in with them - that is not necessarily forests and should not be counted as such.


So to make a long story short, I think the real number for Texas is definitely higher then 7% but lower then 38%. 15% to 20% or so seems reasonable.
7% of Texas is still larger than 100% of many states, for what it's worth.
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Old 10-05-2016, 08:59 PM
 
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Poor soil quality/mechanics can limit forest growth, even when the climate is suitable. This is why Southern Louisiana, Texas Gulf Coast, and Florida (south of the Panhandle) can have areas without much trees naturally, even though they get lots of rain.

I'd wager that places like Houston, New Orleans, Miami, Lake Charles, etc, climate-wise, can grow trees better than many cities in more forested areas, such as Seattle, Atlanta, or Raleigh.

Last edited by User_Null; 10-05-2016 at 09:09 PM..
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Old 10-05-2016, 09:32 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Are there stats for forestland that includes non-timberland?
I am not sure but you can look them up individually. Like I said before, the US Dept of Agriculture only counts "timberland", so some states may have higher amounts. New York for instance which is listed as 50.9% for timberland is actually over 63% forested by its own reckoning.

Forests - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation
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Old 10-05-2016, 09:33 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,136 posts, read 9,907,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by User_Null View Post
The Texas Gulf coast plain will be covered with forest in due geologic time.



7% of Texas is still larger than 100% of many states, for what it's worth.
That is actually a fair point, especially if you are in eastern Texas.
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Old 10-06-2016, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Brookhaven, Mississippi
135 posts, read 64,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Mississippi is pretty much all loblolly pine forests, if you've ever driven through it you know what I mean. Also very few urban areas.
I would say about 90% of the state is heavily forested. Some parts of the delta communities surrounded by open land.
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Old 10-11-2016, 12:19 AM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
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Maine is definitely up there with most forested state. Never saw denser tree cover than in Maine.
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Old 10-11-2016, 12:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Not to me. The Panhandle is virtually free of trees, although there are lots of green grasses. The Gulf Coastal Plain has very few trees and west of San Antonio is virtually treeless past the Hill Country. Drive out through Midland/Odessa or Fort Stockton some time and you'll see what I mean.
Yes, it is true that Midessa is flat and treeless.
-WT
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