U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Where would Toronto place among US cities in terms of significance?
3rd 12 17.91%
4th 20 29.85%
5th 11 16.42%
6th 7 10.45%
7th 7 10.45%
8th 5 7.46%
Other 5 7.46%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-05-2016, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,397 posts, read 55,240,452 times
Reputation: 15490

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Canada excludes all First Nations people (39k in the GTA) as well as anyone who lists white or any european nation on the census from the visible minority category. meaning someone who checks a Ghanaian who emigrates from England is not considered a visible minority. The city is rougly 405 foreign born, and its immigrant population doesn't come from one country or region.

2006 Census : Visible Minority Population and Population Group Reference Guide
Your link says this:
Visible minority population refers to the visible minority group to which the respondent belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.' Categories in the visible minority population variable include Chinese, South Asian, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Southeast Asian, Arab, West Asian, Korean, Japanese, Visible minority, n.i.e. ('n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'), Multiple visible minority, and Not a visible minority.

Its what we call people that are NOT Non-Hispanic White.

So lets take a look at Toronto compared to US cities based on what we know.

1. We know that the Toronto CMA is about half white by US standards-this places it in the middle of the pack among the major US statistical areas.

2. We know that the Toronto CMA( 6 million pop) has the 2nd lowest GDP only slightly larger than Detroit but smaller than Miami( and Seattle for that matter)

3. We know that Toronto's air travel statistics place it well behind NY, LA, Chicago, SF, DC, Dallas, Atlanta as far as passengers.

4. We know that Toronto does not dominate any industry in such a way that it can compete with much less surpass a US counterpart.

And so forth, these are what's come to mind right now.

In short, Toronto is a very big fish in Canada but versus US cities really falls short as far as 'rankings' go.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-05-2016, 08:43 AM
 
7,744 posts, read 4,592,970 times
Reputation: 8460
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Your link says this:
Visible minority population refers to the visible minority group to which the respondent belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.' Categories in the visible minority population variable include Chinese, South Asian, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Southeast Asian, Arab, West Asian, Korean, Japanese, Visible minority, n.i.e. ('n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'), Multiple visible minority, and Not a visible minority.

Its what we call people that are NOT Non-Hispanic White.

So lets take a look at Toronto compared to US cities based on what we know.

1. We know that the Toronto CMA is about half white by US standards-this places it in the middle of the pack among the major US statistical areas.

2. We know that the Toronto CMA( 6 million pop) has the 2nd lowest GDP only slightly larger than Detroit but smaller than Miami( and Seattle for that matter)

3. We know that Toronto's air travel statistics place it well behind NY, LA, Chicago, SF, DC, Dallas, Atlanta as far as passengers.

4. We know that Toronto does not dominate any industry in such a way that it can compete with much less surpass a US counterpart.

And so forth, these are what's come to mind right now.

In short, Toronto is a very big fish in Canada but versus US cities really falls short as far as 'rankings' go.
This is the passage I was referring to

Quote:
In contrast, in accordance with employment equity definitions, persons who reported 'Latin American' and 'White,' 'Arab' and 'White,' or 'West Asian' and 'White' have been excluded from the visible minority population. Likewise, persons who reported 'Latin American,' 'Arab' or 'West Asian' and who provided a European write-in response such as 'French' have been excluded from the visible minority population as well. These persons are included in the 'Not a visible minority' category. However, persons who reported 'Latin American,' 'Arab' or 'West Asian' and a non-European write-in response are included in the visible minority population. For example, respondents who checked 'Latin American' and wrote in 'Peruvian' are included in the 'Latin American' count. Respondents who reported 'Arab' and wrote in 'Lebanese' are included in the 'Arab' count. Respondents who reported 'West Asian' and wrote in 'Afghan' were included in the 'West Asian' count.
We would probably count these people as minorities. They don't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,502 posts, read 1,358,039 times
Reputation: 1723
#4 right after Chicago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 09:07 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,329 posts, read 19,597,329 times
Reputation: 13112
Toronto is around the same level as Washington DC and San Francisco.

So, around the 4th or 5th U.S. city. Certainly high-ranking on the world stage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,397 posts, read 55,240,452 times
Reputation: 15490
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
#4 right after Chicago.
Once again, Toronto is an economic lightweight compared to every top 12 US CSA except Detroit so idk.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 09:24 AM
 
150 posts, read 146,682 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Once again, Toronto is an economic lightweight compared to every top 12 US CSA except Detroit so idk.
Context of the Greater Golden Horseshoe | Neptis Foundation

https://www.placestogrow.ca/index.ph...=366&Itemid=15

The Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH), shown in Figure 1.1, the area to which the Growth Plan applies, is located in southern Ontario. Centred on the City of Toronto, the GGH covers almost 32,000 square kilometres and includes large cities, rapidly growing suburban municipalities, mid-sized centres, small towns and villages, and rural areas.
The GGH is Canada’s largest urbanized area and the economic engine of Ontario. In 2006, the population of the GGH was 8.4 million and home to two-thirds of the population of Ontario and nearly one-third of the total Canadian population. Economic activity in the GGH generates approximately two-thirds of Ontario’s and one-fifth of Canada’s GDP.[1]

Ontario's 2014 GDP was roughly $750 billion Canadian. Average USD to CAD in 2014 was roughly $1.10. So roughly $750 billion CAD / roughly 1.1 ≈ $680 billion USD --> roughly $680 billion USD X roughly 0.66 ≈ $450 billion USD


That puts the GTA much higher than 12th.

Then, there arises a point about how different places calculate GDP in different ways i.e., infrastructure. Also, GDP neglects foreign capital inflows which Canada would rank third in America after New York and San Francisco.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,397 posts, read 55,240,452 times
Reputation: 15490
Quote:
Originally Posted by joey joe-joe View Post
Context of the Greater Golden Horseshoe | Neptis Foundation

https://www.placestogrow.ca/index.ph...=366&Itemid=15

The Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH), shown in Figure 1.1, the area to which the Growth Plan applies, is located in southern Ontario. Centred on the City of Toronto, the GGH covers almost 32,000 square kilometres and includes large cities, rapidly growing suburban municipalities, mid-sized centres, small towns and villages, and rural areas.
The GGH is Canada’s largest urbanized area and the economic engine of Ontario. In 2006, the population of the GGH was 8.4 million and home to two-thirds of the population of Ontario and nearly one-third of the total Canadian population. Economic activity in the GGH generates approximately two-thirds of Ontario’s and one-fifth of Canada’s GDP.[1]

Ontario's 2014 GDP was roughly $750 billion Canadian. Average USD to CAD in 2014 was roughly $1.10. So roughly $750 billion CAD / roughly 1.1 ≈ $680 billion USD --> roughly $680 billion USD X roughly 0.66 ≈ $450 billion USD


That puts the GTA much higher than 12th.

Then, there arises a point about how different places calculate GDP in different ways i.e., infrastructure. Also, GDP neglects foreign capital inflows which Canada would rank third in America after New York and San Francisco.
$450 billion puts Toronto at 8th in between Dallas and Philadelphia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Boston
432 posts, read 357,622 times
Reputation: 431
I think people need to take into account that one of the reasons why Toronto is such a big name is because it is the biggest city in Canada and is their central hub. If Toronto was always in the US historically, it would not have such a big name. It would be a midwestern city, and Chicago would outshine it. This is not to say that it would be like a Detroit or Indy, I just don't think it would be as important if it was always in the US. That being said, if it were always in the US I think it would be a very different city. It would have been built up more, it would have a way more people and a way larger black population, and it would have more Headquarters located there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,397 posts, read 55,240,452 times
Reputation: 15490
Quote:
Originally Posted by intheclouds1 View Post
I think people need to take into account that one of the reasons why Toronto is such a big name is because it is the biggest city in Canada and is their central hub.
Toronto isnt really that talked about on the West Coast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2016, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,502 posts, read 1,358,039 times
Reputation: 1723
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Toronto isnt really that talked about on the West Coast.
And you think SF is talked about in Toronto? It's not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top