U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-24-2008, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,451 posts, read 8,155,580 times
Reputation: 2346

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gameguy56 View Post
I'm being fair to LA, they are the most dense metro area in THE NATION!

The density of the metro area is on the order of 7000+ per sq mile.
Yet my impression of the LA area from what I've read and my limited amount of time there is that it isn't particularly walker/non-car friendly. The Los Angeles area may be densely developed at the macro level but I don't believe it is densely developed for the most part at the micro level.

Relatively high density + non-walkable (and/or land use segregated) areas = terrible, terrible traffic congestion
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-24-2008, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Fairfax
2,880 posts, read 6,169,448 times
Reputation: 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottie View Post
Id say :
1) NYC
2) Chicago
3) San Francisco
4) Miami I guess
From there its a toss up

I like your picks if you are only talking city propers. But I assume you're talking metro areas since the op said "metro 1 million+"

If you're talking about the Metro Area, NYC's sprawls deep into CT, just about all of NJ, and most of Long Island. And Chicago's sprawl meets the Wisconsin border. You are right about San Fran though, the bay area is home to 7 mill+ but is reasonably compact around the bay.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,180 posts, read 13,053,875 times
Reputation: 1609
All cities have sprawl. It is a national issue, not a local one. What amazes me is that few are mentioning smaller cities and towns that also have huge amounts of sprawl. I was in Oshkosh, Wisconsin and the sprawl was unreal. Nothing of note downtown. Everything was out on a freeway and beyond. It was amazing. I don't want to single that out but just mentioned it as an example. There is sprawl all over and the big cities are not the only culprits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Fairfax
2,880 posts, read 6,169,448 times
Reputation: 1230
This is a tough question though...........

in no particular order:
Portland
Rochester, NY
Seattle
Buffalo, NY
Pittsburgh
Minneapolis?
New Orleans
Memphis
San Fran
Salt Lake City?

This is probably the hardest list I've ever made lol. Every metro with a pop. over 1 mill is going to have some sprawl but imo these cities tend to have less of it. Some of my picks are from personal experience, some from hearing about them on this board, and some from my good friend google earth. Have to admit, a couple blind guesses in there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Live in VA, Work in MD, Play in DC
697 posts, read 2,024,700 times
Reputation: 263
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMDallas View Post
I thought LA was famous for being all sprawled... and How are cities like DC not up there?
The DC metro is actually very sprawled out, and covers sizable distance in Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia. The outer suburbs especially are the very definition of sprawl. The inner areas are substantially much more dense.

I read an interesting article arguing that the height restrictions of buildings in Washington D.C. has helped cause massive sprawl in the surrounding areas, because people are forced outwards and not upwards.

This "forced" outward expansion may have helped cause the massive traffic problems in the area and also might have help cause housing prices to skyrocket.

The article states that some of the benefits from having the height restriction is that architects have to be resourceful in designing their buildings, especially the interior. It also allows sunlight to hit every part of the city, to give it an airy, open feeling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 01:09 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood
2,223 posts, read 4,136,478 times
Reputation: 1767
How about this ----

The sprawl epidemic has reached epic proportions - every metropolitan area has it! It can't be stopped!

Do something, somebody!!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,451 posts, read 8,155,580 times
Reputation: 2346
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenken627 View Post
I read an interesting article arguing that the height restrictions of buildings in Washington D.C. has helped cause massive sprawl in the surrounding areas, because people are forced outwards and not upwards.

This "forced" outward expansion may have helped cause the massive traffic problems in the area and also might have help cause housing prices to skyrocket.
I've long thought this was the case. If DC got rid of those height restrictions away from the Washington Mall (or a certain radius/buffer zone around the Mall), I think that would help with the housing cost issue in the DC area. Not a lot mind you, because taller buildings would only address condominium and apartment needs for the most part, but a little.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Live in VA, Work in MD, Play in DC
697 posts, read 2,024,700 times
Reputation: 263
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHIP72 View Post
I've long thought this was the case. If DC got rid of those height restrictions away from the Washington Mall (or a certain radius/buffer zone around the Mall), I think that would help with the housing cost issue in the DC area. Not a lot mind you, because taller buildings would only address condominium and apartment needs for the most part, but a little.
It's interesting that you say that.

Philadelphia had an informal height restriction for much of its history. No building could be constructed over William Penn's statue on top of City Hall.

It wasn't until the mid 1980's when developers finally got permission to construct a building higher. After that, skyscrapers started popping all over Philly.

(This caused the infamous Billy Penn Curse on all Philly professional sports franchises, none have won a championship since William Penn was overshadowed by taller buildings.)

Here is another article I just looked up from the Washington Post that was fairly recent - 2007.

High-Level Debate On Future of D.C. - washingtonpost.com

Some interesting lines -

But Leinberger, who renewed debate over the law after a February talk at the National Building Museum, contends that the height restriction drives up real estate prices and deprives the government of tax revenue.


Last edited by ontheroad; 02-28-2008 at 08:31 PM.. Reason: potential copyright issue
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 02:11 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,842 posts, read 21,147,636 times
Reputation: 9420
LA = high density sprawl

(ei, the worst of both worlds)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2008, 02:18 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,053,448 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by gameguy56 View Post
I'm being fair to LA, they are the most dense metro area in THE NATION!

The density of the metro area is on the order of 7000+ per sq mile.
That's because its sprawl has generated adjacent sprawling areas like Orange County and the "Inland Empire", which the census bureau for some reason consider to be separate metro areas. Does the LA sprawl really stop at the Orange County line?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top