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Old 10-04-2016, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,631,733 times
Reputation: 2893

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Children in poverty (100 percent poverty) | KIDS COUNT Data Center

It seems like the rates are going way down in some places but increasing in a few cities.

Los Angeles has gone from 290,000 children in poverty to 249,000.
Long Beach has gone from 38,000 to 31,000

San Francisco has seen a decrease from a very low 16,000 to 13,000 and San Jose from 39,000 to 24,000 children in poverty.

In fact, most California cities have seen huge decreases in childhood poverty rates.

Portland has gone from 26,000 to 17,000 children in poverty and Seattle 16,000 to 10,000.

Oddly, California poverty isn't moving to Las Vegas as it has gone from 43,000 to 35,000 children in poverty.

Phoenix though has gone from 128,000 in poverty in 2011 to 132,000 in 2015.

Being familiar with the West it seems like Phoenix and Tucson are the premier cities of choice for poor families in the west.

Phoenix has had excellent economic growth for years now, but yet the child poverty rate has increased. Arizona has a very good safety-net for a western state for families with children and there is a massive abundance of cheap, single-family rentals that accept section 8 for them also.

Las Vegas on the hand doesn't seem to getting poor California families. This is likely due to the religion of libertarianism and the love of very low taxes many Nevadans prefer. Las Vegas isn't known to be a city to role out of the red-carpet for welfare families.

Denver has gone from 40,000 to 33,000 children in poverty.

I know in the last several years many formally section 8 apartments with $1 apartments are newly-redone apartments for roommates to work in.

Denver is in the position where the families either have to be on welfare housing or live with their families which is common.

Chicago and New York has also seen a large decrease in childhood poverty.

The report basically showcases that the best way to reduce child poverty is to price low-income families out of the rental market (Seattle and San Francisco) or have a very lean safety-net (Las Vegas)
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Old 10-05-2016, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,198 posts, read 1,297,521 times
Reputation: 2045
Why not list the percentages? That's what matter right?
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Old 10-05-2016, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,744 times
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Columbus, and Ohio in general, unfortunately has a high infant mortality rate. The rate correlates highly to socioeconomic/ racial disparities with African-American children disproportionately being affected in our urban areas.

Glad to see the numbers of children living in poverty decreasing but we have a lot of work to do.
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Old 10-05-2016, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,198 posts, read 1,297,521 times
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Amazing that Chicago and Baltimore have had nearly identical rates of child poverty to Boston yet have so much more youth crime. i think Chicago has a lower poverty rate overall actually.

Having been raised in Boston i definitely saw a considerable amount of poverty and its consequences but I wonder why there is so much more gun violence in Chicago and Baltimore...
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Old 10-06-2016, 07:17 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 1,032,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Amazing that Chicago and Baltimore have had nearly identical rates of child poverty to Boston yet have so much more youth crime. i think Chicago has a lower poverty rate overall actually.

Having been raised in Boston i definitely saw a considerable amount of poverty and its consequences but I wonder why there is so much more gun violence in Chicago and Baltimore...
You ask why? This explains why at great length: Shoot to Kill: Why Baltimore is one of the most lethal cities in the U.S.

“Everybody wants to be a killer. It's more killings going on now because everybody feel like they got to prove themselves.”
- DEVANTE TURNER-FORDBEY, WHO SURVIVED 27 SHOTS

Since I lived near the trio of hit men raised in the same house described in the article (and I know which house,) I have made a conscious decision not to know any of the street people around me. Just knowing those people can get you killed.
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Old 10-06-2016, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,035 posts, read 4,554,605 times
Reputation: 1419
A lot of cities are kicking poor people out of city limits so a decrease should be expected.
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