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Old 10-05-2016, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,457,826 times
Reputation: 6186

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I didn't move up north (not yet) but I moved from Miami to west and north Texas, and it might as well be Nebraska compared to back home in winter time. The cold is so easy to adapt to, and far easier to deal with than heat. You don't sweat in the cold and the humidity is low by default (a humid cold day is much drier than a humid hot day) and you can always add clothes but you can only take off so much. Also it costs less to heat the house. I run air conditioner when its hot, that racks up the electric bill by a lot. When its cold, we run a gas heater. Its pocket change.

Back home, people bust out jackets in the 50s. I am usually in just a t. shirt in the 50s. Maybe if its really windy or rainy I'll wear a sweater, but I love sweaters anyway. I don't get the obsession so many have with being half naked outside every day. And its often people who need to hit the gym more often than not :P

Btw 103 and 80% humidity is not likely weather on planet Earth. That implies a 96 degree dewpoint which would KILL you.
The Panhandle of Texas isn't really cold. Compared to Florida yes, but heating costs in MN far exceed cooling costs there.

As an example, when I lived in KC, my 2500 sq ft house had a maximum gas heating bill of $450 in the highest month but I never exceeded $150 for cooling.

Here in Texas the maximum gas heating bill I've had is $150 and the highest cooling bill is like $300.

I had some relatives in the Northeast that said oil heating bills ran $1000/month for an old 4000 sq ft house.
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Old 10-05-2016, 05:21 PM
 
1,652 posts, read 794,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Mind me asking where you live in the South? Only a thin coastal strip in the South in winter is as mild as you claim with coldest nights of 18-20F, and have a coldest day in the 40'sF. You are either right on the Gulf Coast, right on the Atlantic Coast from Charleston on south, or in TX from Houston on south.

Most Americans don't realize how cold the majority of the inland South can get in winter. Do people realize that the record low in Savannah, GA is 3F in 1985 (not like a hundred years ago lol). They have had a day there where it didn't get above freezing as recent as 2014 where it reached 31F for a high. Subtropical paradise it isn't lol.

Columbia, SC in 2014 they had a day that only got to 30F for a high. In 2014 it went down to 11F at night, and in 2015 it got down to 12F. You don't even want to know how cold it got there in the 1980's.

Atlanta is even colder. Same for places like Montgomery, AL and Jackson, MS. Only the immediate coast in the South is as mild as you claim, and then even places like Savannah and Mobile have gone into the single digits F and have had days that didn't get above freezing.

And even Savannah gets snow as it averages .3" of snow per year. Certainly hardly any at all compared to more northerly locales, and many years Savannah gets nothing, but some years it gets decent ice and snow storms. Inland it is more.

The South is not nearly as mild as people perceive in winter. Averages there are very deceptive and temps go up and down all winter long and they can get decent snowstorms some cold years as well.
South AL. When i said 40, I said a "cold day's high is low 40s" not neccessarily the coldest day. I probably should have said high 30s instead but to be fair we might only have a handful of days that cold. The coldest night I can remember in the past 10 years was 18 degrees at 5am. To me that was COLD. Now I find myself on the opposite side of the spectrum up here. I walk outside when it's 40s and see people in a t-shirt walking their dogs.
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Old 10-05-2016, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,407,796 times
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Half the battle is dressing the part.

Also vodka. Lots of vodka.
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Old 10-05-2016, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,457,826 times
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I had a friend from Saskatchewan that wore shorts year round down to 0 degrees. Jeans below that.

He would wear shorts and t-shirt down to 30 and then light jacket down to 20 and coat from 20 to 0 (but still shorts). He was miserable when it was above 80.

He ended up getting a job that required him to wear a suit everyday so I wonder how hard the transition was...
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Old 10-05-2016, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,314,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShiverMeTimber View Post
Thanks thatoneguy for the lengthy reply!

I know some people really really hate the snow. To be honest I'm working outside right now up north for a temp job night shift and I'm already feeling uncomfortable when the wind gets to blowing with my normal southern gear on and it's just high 30s low 40s but it feels way colder than I'm used to with the wind. When you layer up, do you wear 2 pairs of jeans and like 2 pairs of socks? I have decent boots but no snow yet just nasty thick mud. What do you wear on the outermost layer to keep the wind from getting through? Like a 3xl rain jacket over a heavy coat?

Again sorry for the super newbish questions. Also when you layer up properly are you actually warm or is it still friggin cold? Haha
Not necessarily 2 pairs of jeans but light thermal pants under your regular pants. It helps a lot. Layering is more serious on what you wear over your shirt/under your jacket. You can be really creative with this. I'm not too into fashion but a lot of people in NYC love the colder months because they can be more creative with what they wear.

You don't have to go too expensive generally, but the two things that I would invest $$$ on would be high quality boots and a coat/jacket. These are things that you will be wearing everyday, so it's better to invest in a higher quality item. I wouldn't wear a rainjacket over a winter coat. You won't be getting a lot of rain, it'll be snow instead. If it is raining, that means it's above freezing temps and probably too warm for a real winter coat. If you layer up enough then the wind should not be too much of a problem. A scarf helps a lot too.

Also you should always have a hat and gloves. And yeah, wearing an extra layer of socks helps a lot too. You'll get used to it and you'll find what works for you and what doesn't.
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Old 10-05-2016, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,079 posts, read 3,404,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
The Panhandle of Texas isn't really cold. Compared to Florida yes, but heating costs in MN far exceed cooling costs there.

As an example, when I lived in KC, my 2500 sq ft house had a maximum gas heating bill of $450 in the highest month but I never exceeded $150 for cooling.

Here in Texas the maximum gas heating bill I've had is $150 and the highest cooling bill is like $300.

I had some relatives in the Northeast that said oil heating bills ran $1000/month for an old 4000 sq ft house.
Never been to the Panhandle. I'm talking about where I've lived.. San Angelo, Cisco, Abilene and now Denton. I mean western and northern, not northwestern. All those 4 towns get to at least 20 degrees each year so while not like up north it still gets fairly cold.

Of course heating costs in MN are more expensive than their cooling costs, their summers are a breeze and their winters are hardcore, but I betcha cooling costs in Texas exceed heating costs in Minnesota. There's multiple ways to heat a home; gas, electricity, fireplace, but really only one way to properly cool a house. Also your bills will vary depending on how big your house is.

I never had a gas bill that was that high. Only gas things at my house is stove and heater and heater is used only in winter and we don't do all that much cooking often. The AC is just tied in with the other electric bills so on top of the high AC bill you also got lights, television, etc. etc.

In Minnesota you really need heat for about 4 and a half months on average, unless you're a wuss, then make it 6 lol but in Texas you need the AC for actually, nearly 6 months... 8 if you're a wuss lol. It reached 91 degrees today and its early October already. We're still using AC while MPLS lows are in the 40s and 50s this week, so they still don't need the heat yet. I make it a rule a thumb to not turn on the heat unless it gets to the 30s but I have roommates and they insist on leaving it on even when it warms up in winter because "its hard to turn it back on." Tsk tsk.
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Old 10-05-2016, 11:13 PM
 
473 posts, read 360,219 times
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I moved from North to South, but having lived in both, I would say the two biggest adjustments will be:

-You lose at least 3-4 months when you can't do outdoor activities. I love to run and hike and I know people do those things in the cold, but when I lived in a cold environment, I basically wanted to go from point A to point B spending as little time outside as possible. By March I was getting cabin fever.

-Winter lingers. In the South, it's not unusual for winter to be out the door by the end of February. In the Northeast, March is cold till the bitter end and April is what February feels like down South.

That said, I did miss a good, heavy snowfall. And, unlike the South, the North actually invests in salt trucks and plows. So there's that.
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Old 10-06-2016, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,457,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Never been to the Panhandle. I'm talking about where I've lived.. San Angelo, Cisco, Abilene and now Denton. I mean western and northern, not northwestern. All those 4 towns get to at least 20 degrees each year so while not like up north it still gets fairly cold.

Of course heating costs in MN are more expensive than their cooling costs, their summers are a breeze and their winters are hardcore, but I betcha cooling costs in Texas exceed heating costs in Minnesota. There's multiple ways to heat a home; gas, electricity, fireplace, but really only one way to properly cool a house. Also your bills will vary depending on how big your house is.

I never had a gas bill that was that high. Only gas things at my house is stove and heater and heater is used only in winter and we don't do all that much cooking often. The AC is just tied in with the other electric bills so on top of the high AC bill you also got lights, television, etc. etc.

In Minnesota you really need heat for about 4 and a half months on average, unless you're a wuss, then make it 6 lol but in Texas you need the AC for actually, nearly 6 months... 8 if you're a wuss lol. It reached 91 degrees today and its early October already. We're still using AC while MPLS lows are in the 40s and 50s this week, so they still don't need the heat yet. I make it a rule a thumb to not turn on the heat unless it gets to the 30s but I have roommates and they insist on leaving it on even when it warms up in winter because "its hard to turn it back on." Tsk tsk.
MN is getting into the mid 30's at night right now, I guarantee that heating is on in homes up there.

I only use A/C 4-5 months in Texas (I guess that makes me super tough by your definition lol). When I lived up north I used it 6-7 months. Usually started around October and ended April. There was a snowstorm in Pittsburgh one April by the way.

Unless you've lived up north and have experience -5 or below you don't know what you're talking about. As I've lived both north and south I'm fully qualified to talk about this.
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Old 10-06-2016, 08:04 AM
 
3,676 posts, read 1,550,232 times
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If you really hate the cold, you'll probably never get use to it. My wife was raised in Boston and hated the cold. In the late 1980's, she moved here to Charlotte and loves it. It was the combination of the climate, economy, and cost of living that brought her here. Like others have said, dress in layers. I don't mind hot humid weather and I don't mind cold and snow. I actually love snow, lol. So long as I can dress appropriately for the weather I'm in, I'm fine.
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Old 10-06-2016, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,344 posts, read 10,336,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShiverMeTimber View Post
South AL. When i said 40, I said a "cold day's high is low 40s" not neccessarily the coldest day. I probably should have said high 30s instead but to be fair we might only have a handful of days that cold. The coldest night I can remember in the past 10 years was 18 degrees at 5am. To me that was COLD. Now I find myself on the opposite side of the spectrum up here. I walk outside when it's 40s and see people in a t-shirt walking their dogs.

So you are thinking about moving north, or are you already somewhere other than South AL? I have a friend I work with that grew up in Satsuma, AL, and after a year or two she had no problem with Philly winters.

MN does have a low unemployment rate it seems. Down around 3% compared to 5% in PA.
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