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Old 10-05-2016, 04:09 AM
 
1,652 posts, read 792,716 times
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I'm looking at jobs in the northwest from MN to NE. Coming from the south where we have maybe 2-3 days where the low gets to 18-20 degrees F and a cold day's high is 40s, how difficult is it to adjust to the winter in the the northern states? I've seen maybe an inch of snow in 5 years and it was melted by noon. How much colder does it feel and what clothing does everybody wear daily for just running erands or going to work? Also will a 2wd jeep with limited slip diff suffice in cities?

Sorry for the ignorant questions. I know 103f and 80% humidity, but northern cold is totally foreign to me.
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Old 10-05-2016, 04:29 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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I was born and raised in the Northeast and I still hate the cold! Part of it definitely comes down to personal preference though. I can't speak for adjusting to it from the South. For clothes, you have to wear multiple layers Everytime you go outside, even if you're just going for a short walk, or it's going to be reaaaally uncomfortable. The trick is really to layer up. That's how you get through winter easily. Also you're going to need to invest in some snow boots, because you're going to see a LOT more snow than that. In NYC last winter we had one snow storm that dumped 26 inches of snow on us in one night, and last winter was considered extremely mild! You CANNOT walk in the snow that we get without boots. Make sure you have high top, high quality boots that are also slip resistant, because the ground will not just be covered in snow, but ice too. Also, snow melts very slowly up in the north. It can last for weeks. And after a few weeks there's bound to be more snow, so there will almost always be snow on the ground throughout the whole winter. I can't tell you about driving because I live in NYC and don't need a car.

Let me know if you have any other questions I can help you with
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Old 10-05-2016, 05:17 AM
 
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Thanks thatoneguy for the lengthy reply!

I know some people really really hate the snow. To be honest I'm working outside right now up north for a temp job night shift and I'm already feeling uncomfortable when the wind gets to blowing with my normal southern gear on and it's just high 30s low 40s but it feels way colder than I'm used to with the wind. When you layer up, do you wear 2 pairs of jeans and like 2 pairs of socks? I have decent boots but no snow yet just nasty thick mud. What do you wear on the outermost layer to keep the wind from getting through? Like a 3xl rain jacket over a heavy coat?

Again sorry for the super newbish questions. Also when you layer up properly are you actually warm or is it still friggin cold? Haha
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Old 10-05-2016, 05:28 AM
 
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Start with just dressing appropriately...... Nor'easters, while not very common, can hit coastal Northeastern areas hard. While they may have some of the equipment to clear the snow, it may take longer due to density and they aren't as common. Areas near the Great Lakes generally are pretty good about clearing snow and even the worst storms still can be cleared quicker than other areas that may be hit with a similar storm.

Also, life generally goes on during the winter. So, it may be a matter of doing things during the season in order from feeling cooped up.
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Old 10-05-2016, 06:40 AM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
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I grew up in Massachusetts and never got used to it. Every year around November I'd start dreading the next four months. One thing I've noticed among my friends who stayed there is that many of them ski, or do some kind of winter activity that takes advantage of the cold. I never liked skiiing, so that might have made it worse. But if you pick up some kind of winter sport that might make it easier.
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Old 10-05-2016, 06:42 AM
 
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My mother is a Virginaian who moved up north. She never got used to it. My wife is a Virginian who's spent most of her adult life in Chicago, Boston and Pittsburgh. She never got used to it.
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Old 10-05-2016, 07:38 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShiverMeTimber View Post
When you layer up, do you wear 2 pairs of jeans and like 2 pairs of socks? I have decent boots but no snow yet just nasty thick mud. What do you wear on the outermost layer to keep the wind from getting through? Like a 3xl rain jacket over a heavy coat?

Again sorry for the super newbish questions. Also when you layer up properly are you actually warm or is it still friggin cold? Haha
If you layer properly you should stay pretty comfortable, hardest parts to keep warm are toes, nose and ears.
No to the two pair of jeans. Some good thermal long johns and/or fleece lined jeans, or an insulated coverall if you work outside all day. T-shirt or thermal under a regular shirt, maybe add a sweater or sweatshirt, and a coat. Wool socks, and if you're going to wear a second, thinner pair under those make sure there is plenty of wiggle room in your boots.

Good gloves (mittens are warmer but harder to work with) are a must. Don't cheap out on the coat and if the wind really bothers you consider a coat with attached hood, maybe one that has a drawstring to tighten it close to your face, and knit cuffs and maybe a ribbed waistband if it's a short casual coat. A good winter coat should keep out moisture and wind, no need to add a raincoat over it. You can always add a knit hat, earbands, scarf, or ski mask too.
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Old 10-05-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,793 posts, read 9,432,166 times
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I went to Pittsburgh for college after living in the South my whole life. The first year was the worst. I remember it was 35 degrees (on a cold night) in Pittsburgh in late September and it was still 93 degrees (in the day) down in Louisiana. I quickly did the math and realized that I probably hadn't thought this cold thing out very well.

The next day I went to Burlington Coat Factory, bought a big down coat and that helped the first winter. I still remember the first time I experienced 0 degrees (F). I remember waking up to "Good morning Pittsburgh it's zero degrees." I didn't even know what that would feel like, and it kind of takes your breath away. Keep in mind I walked to all my classes.

In any case, I found that the heating systems up north are far more powerful than down south. Classrooms would be like 80 degrees, a lot of times I would be in short sleeves. Just like the south likes to crank A/C, the north likes to crank heat, especially when it's freezing.

The second year was better, third was really difficult because it was one of those "polar vortex years", and fourth year was easiest because I knew I was getting the heck out of there.

I was spending fall, winter, and spring in Pittsburgh and summer in Louisiana, talk about tough! So, when I graduated, I studied the climates of all cities around the country and decided that San Jose, CA had the best combination of climate and jobs so I took a job out in Silicon Valley.

That being said, I would NEVER live in the Northeast again. Midwest is out as well.
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Old 10-05-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
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Just dress properly and there should be no problem.
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Old 10-05-2016, 09:18 AM
 
Location: The South
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If you don't like cold weather, you never get used to it. I tried it, didn't like it, and took cold weather places off my list.
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