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Old 10-11-2016, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
Reputation: 2610

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So I found this cool website that shows tree species by height, girth and age in the US, as well as the world.
http://www.monumentaltrees.com/en/heightrecords/usa/

So here are the results if you only look at the tallest species per state.

1. CA: Sequoia sempervirens (Coast redwood) | 115.72 m (379.66 ft)
2. OR: Pseudotsuga menziesii (Coast Douglas-fir) | 99.76 m (327.30 ft)
3. WA: Pseudotsuga menziesii (Coast Douglas-fir) | 69.80 m (229.00 ft)
4. MD: Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip tree) | 42.67 m (140.00 ft)
5. NC: Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn redwood) | 39.65 m (130.09 ft)
6. LA: Pinus taeda (Loblolly pine) | 37 m (121.39 ft)
7. NJ: Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip tree) | 36.57 m (120.00 ft)
8. FL: Pinus taeda (Loblolly pine) | 34 m (111.55 ft)
9. PA: Populus deltoides (Eastern cottonwood) | 32.52 m (106.69 ft)
10. KY: Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn redwood) | 27.40 m (89.90 ft)
11. UT: Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood) | 25.40 m (83.33 ft)
12. CO: Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood) | 22.60 m (74.15 ft)

That database only shows about the tallest 3 specimens per species so it is likely that there are many other states that would be fairly high up the list, just that their tallest tree isn't one of the tallest for that species, but if you know what the tallest tree is in your state let me know.

here are the results of the trees based on girth

1. CA: Sequoiadendron giganteum (Giant sequoia) | ~29.10 m (~95.47 ft)
2. WA: Thuja plicata (Western redcedar) | 18.80 m (61.68 ft)
3. FL: Taxodium distichum (Bald cypress) | 14.15 m (46.42 ft)
4. OR: Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Lawson's cypress) | 11.46 m (37.60 ft)
5. LA: Quercus virginiana (Southern live oak) | 9.17 m (30.09 ft)
6. NY: Quercus alba (White oak) | ~9.01 m (~29.60 ft)
7. VA: Quercus pagoda (Cherrybark oak) | 8.32 m (27.30 ft)
8. NJ: Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) | 8.05 m (26.41 ft)
9. UT: Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood) | 7.74 m (25.39 ft)
10. PA: Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) | ~7.62 m (~25 ft)
11. AZ: Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood) | 7.55 m (24.77 ft)
12. OH: Quercus alba (White oak) | 7.32 m (24.02 ft)
13. WV: Quercus macrocarpa (Bur oak) | 6.76 m (22.18 ft)
14. MD: Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip tree) | 6.40 m (21.00 ft)
15. IN: Platanus × hispanica (London plane) | >5.75 m (>18.86 ft)
16. MI: Juglans nigra (Eastern black walnut) | >5.20 m (>17.06 ft)
17. NC: Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn redwood) | 3.99 m (13.09 ft)
18. KY: Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn redwood) | 2.43 m (7.97 ft)

Same scenario applies as for height.

So any surprises? I personally was somewhat surprised to see only 9 states that had trees taller than 100 ft. And apparently many of the trees around my neighborhood would be among the tallest in the nation since many of them are >70 ft.

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3285...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3264...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 10-12-2016, 03:59 AM
 
970 posts, read 1,639,581 times
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70' trees are but saplings in my hood
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Old 10-12-2016, 08:04 AM
 
2,727 posts, read 5,146,110 times
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The World´s Tree Species: Giant Cedar near Elk River Idaho

Quote:
Near the small town of Elk River, Idaho is the largest tree in North America east of the Cascade -Sierra Crest. The tree is a Western Red Cedar that is 18 feet in diameter at breast hight and 177 feet tall. The sign near the tree identifies it as the "Giant Cedar" but I have also seen it called the "King Cedar". This tree is estimated to be about 3000 years old.
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Old 10-12-2016, 09:56 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,792,885 times
Reputation: 11136
Length vs girth? Let the memes and innuendos begin!
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Old 10-12-2016, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
I wonder if Idaho has any Douglas-firs taller than that since Douglas-firs grow taller than cedars.
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Old 10-12-2016, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
Reputation: 2610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krisps View Post
70' trees are but saplings in my hood
May I ask where you live?
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Old 10-12-2016, 05:55 PM
 
970 posts, read 1,639,581 times
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I'm just playin, 70' of course is a nice height.
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Old 10-12-2016, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
742 posts, read 719,655 times
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According to the Oklahoma Forestry, Oklahoma's tallest recorded tree is a bald cypress at 128' tall.
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Old 10-13-2016, 12:57 PM
 
3,402 posts, read 4,310,269 times
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I live close to 2 different cedar groves in N-Idaho, And don't see Idaho on either list. Also been to a grove in Montana that had huge trees. I think this list is bogus.
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Old 10-13-2016, 01:27 PM
 
2,727 posts, read 5,146,110 times
Reputation: 1938
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I wonder if Idaho has any Douglas-firs taller than that since Douglas-firs grow taller than cedars.


Quote:
http://www.idahoforests.org/dougfir.htm
This species grows rapidly, attaining a height in the Idaho forest of from 100 to 130 feet and a diameter of up to 3 feet. (Douglas-firs found in moister Pacific Coast forests grow to heights of 250 feet and diameters of 8 feet.) Prized for its strength, Douglas-fir has long been preferred for use in structural framing lumber.



Idaho did have the worlds largest Ponderosa Pine at one time before it died and is now cut into pieces for a monument in a city park in Boise.

https://localwiki.org/boise/Kathryn_Alberston_Park

This pdf has a lot of great info.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...fu3U-BTBT-894w
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