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Old 10-14-2016, 09:02 PM
 
79 posts, read 78,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
New England may be a place you like. Politically it is as liberal as Portland or Seattle but culturally it is more conservative and conventional. It also is lush and green without the never ending drizzle and gloom of a northwestern winter. The coastal areas have relatively moderate climates and don't get too hot in the summer. The negative is that it won't be cheaper.
Just quickly looking at some houses in Providence on Zillow, actually surprised at how affordable they are.
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:14 PM
 
5,820 posts, read 5,190,191 times
Reputation: 17729
A LOT of people escaping from the PNW come to the Duluth area - Northern Minnesota - and love it. Beautiful, on Lake Superior, lots of hiking, kayaking, rock climbing and other outdoor activities available, liberal vibe, and very affordable. If you can deal with snow and cold (it's sunny, anyway!) take a look and see what you think!
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,124 posts, read 23,000,049 times
Reputation: 35318
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarlieJMiller View Post
I've lived in Oregon my entire life, and I'm definitely looking to branch out. Oregon's not the worst, but I do have a few complaints beyond the monotony of spending the last 24 years here...

1. I hate the rain.
2. Housing is pretty expensive, even just to rent.
3. I'm not jazzed about marijuana legalization. No judgement if you are, but I'm not.
4. The bigger cities are all in the Willamette Valley (consequently, tons of rain,) and everywhere else is basically Idaho.

There are definitely some things I like about Oregon. I love the availability of unique foods and dietary options, I love the hiking, I love nature and lush, green landscapes, I love the coffee, and generally-speaking, I'm pretty liberal (environmentalist, LGBTQ ally, feminist, etc.) I'm just really looking for a change of scenery with less rain, less pot, and less of my paycheck going directly to rent.

I know, I know. I'm looking for a Shangri-La that doesn't exist in the real world. But I thought maybe there's somewhere out there that could check at least a few items off on my list.

Thanks!
Okay, so you want:

Good weather
Cheap housing
conservative politics regarding marijuana, otherwise liberal politics regarding environment, sexual orientation
urban
outdoor recreation
great shopping, especially Whole Foods type stores
(Um, hey, you can order good coffee online)

Yep, Shangri-La. It doesn't exist.

So, what can you compromise on? Most of what you want comes with a high price tag.

In my experience, at least in CA, is that to get all of the above, except urban and a high price tag, it means you end up in a town with mainly Trump supporters. Now, I have learned after a few years, that I can live with that. Heck, I get an absentee ballot LOL. But, you don't get urban, great shopping and liberal politics hand in hand with cheap rent and great scenery that doesn't involve sharing it with a hundred other people.

Even if you were rich, you wouldn't get all of the above. For instance, you can be rich in SF and have most of what you want - but you'd never be able to enjoy any of the outdoor recreational opportunities in peace. The population is too crowded. So, you could go to the Muir Woods forest, and be tripping over the other nature enthusiasts.

To get to an area where your competition is sparce regarding sharing nature, you have to get farther away from the urban core - and all of the other things you want.

So, what are you willing to sacrifice? Live close-in, pay high rent and travel on weekends farther out to find some peace? Or live in peace and travel into town for the urban stuff you want?

Because you just don't get it all in one place.

Good luck finding a compromise you can be contented with. That's really the best you can hope for.
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Old 10-15-2016, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,649,546 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by 123MoltenCore View Post
I hope that isn't true, Northern Arizona is one of the most beautiful areas in the entire country.
Northern Arizona relies almost entirely on the snow pack for water. And when it's not snowfall it's the CAP (Colorado River) water... Flagstaff historically gets around 100" of snowfall a year, which is 3x the snow of Chicago. I believe recently it has hovered around 80", which is still a lot but is significantly less than 100" and considering N. Arizona relies on the snow to fill the lakes and supply the water it's a serious issue. The drought brings wildfires which are detrimental to N. Arizona especially around closer to the lower elevation "transitional" areas near Prescott and just climbing the Colorado Plateau near Heber. I don't recall the wildfires getting up to Flag but they do happen in the areas closer to the desert but are still forested areas (again Prescott and Payson near them) more regularly. I believe Oak Creek (Sedona) had a wildfire fairly recently.

Unfortunately water issues are heavily politicized, with the Republican Party here in Arizona favoring to "ignore" our water policies (new residential divisions must show 100 years of water stability is one policy on the books) and a few others to favor more housing projects. Considering the GOP runs the whole state albeit a few very small areas, I do blame them for doing this widespread across the state, it's hard to say if the Democrats would handle it any different when they have zero power here.

Also water really comes down to the Colorado River, which will affect Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, Nevada and California SIGNIFICANTLY and will have to be addressed within the next decade by the Department of the Interior. If you read up on it, California has been using more than their allotted share for almost two decades now and it affects the rest of us Western states (except Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon and Washington since they aren't in the agreement) as we all reach droughts. I bet a ton of Coloradans (is that the right term?) don't even know Denver relies on the same river that Phoenix and Los Angeles do. Denver will be hit as well even, it's just a matter of how much.

Northern Arizona is also unique since S. Arizona has aquifers under a lot of the desert, with very large ones under both Phoenix and Tucson, which make them much more stable. I believe Mohave, Navajo, Apache and possibly La Paz counties have near 100% reliance on the Colorado River, with Coconino (includes Flagstaff) also being significantly hit in its northern part.

I agree with you, N. Arizona is very beautiful and I would kill to live in Flagstaff, but it's in the same drought as the rest of us.
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Old 10-16-2016, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,681,631 times
Reputation: 35449
I moved from Portland, OR to a nice suburb next to Cleveland, OH called Lakewood. My area has all you are looking for but there are the snowy, cold winters which you might not like.

We do have four seasons, right now it's in the mid 70's sunny and pleasant. It's been that way for a couple of weeks now. A little rain mostly during the evening but that's about it. But winter will come so that's a dealbreaker for many people.
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Old 10-16-2016, 02:04 PM
 
9 posts, read 6,577 times
Reputation: 29
NoMoreSnowForMe, if I had to sacrifice anything, I guess it'd be the accessibility to urban amenities. I'm okay with a more rural vibe, and, consequently, me conservative politics. I'm just sick the rain and pervasive stoner culture here in the Willamette valley, so I'm willing to try anywhere that doesn't have those two things.
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Old 10-16-2016, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,063 posts, read 23,951,957 times
Reputation: 30966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Northern Arizona relies almost entirely on the snow pack for water. And when it's not snowfall it's the CAP (Colorado River) water...
Twenty five years ago, my husband told me that he wanted to retire to the desert SW. I told him he could enjoy that by himself because I wasn't going to live downstream from anyone.

I like streams, rivers, lakes and seasons. While I don't love winter, I'm willing to put up with it for a glorious spring, hot summer and colorful autumn.

I haven't lived in a city for 30 years. Living outside is good enough for me.
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:07 PM
 
1,230 posts, read 976,434 times
Reputation: 939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
New England may be a place you like. Politically it is as liberal as Portland or Seattle but culturally it is more conservative and conventional. It also is lush and green without the never ending drizzle and gloom of a northwestern winter. The coastal areas have relatively moderate climates and don't get too hot in the summer. The negative is that it won't be cheaper.
That's somewhat true but it's really only cool in the summer if your house is on the water. I lived a mile or two away from the coast. It was always hot as hell at my house.

It's definitely not a mild climate in the winter either. They say the ocean keeps the coast warmer during the winter. Barely noticeable. It's cold and snowy.
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Old 10-16-2016, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,649,546 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Twenty five years ago, my husband told me that he wanted to retire to the desert SW. I told him he could enjoy that by himself because I wasn't going to live downstream from anyone.

I like streams, rivers, lakes and seasons. While I don't love winter, I'm willing to put up with it for a glorious spring, hot summer and colorful autumn.

I haven't lived in a city for 30 years. Living outside is good enough for me.
We will reach a state of emergency most likely, hopefully it scares a lot of people out (I personally wouldn't mind this) and we will be bailed out one way or another. What may happen with desalination happening California may be cut off the Colorado River water entirely. California I believe gets quite a few million more acres of water than Arizona does (Arizona gets #2 most and I think this is fair as Arizona has more mileage of the Colorado River than any other state) and while our CAP water is distributed throughout the entire state, CA's ONLY serve Los Angeles and San Diego area and up to the AZ/CA border, meaning SF and Fresno aren't getting this water. Only roughly the southern 1/3 of California. Considering that, it means Southern California has been much more wasteful with water than us Zonies as a whole. If the Department of Interior said, "Hey California, invest in desalination we are kicking you out," the entire rest of the West (albeit the ones not in the Colorado River treaty) would see stable water and maybe even a surplus which will raise Lake Mead back up to where it once was eventually, assuming the rest of this water isn't redistributed back to the states. California is the only one that can desalinate.

We do get seasons in quite a bit of areas. I think Flagstaff has a stunning autumn and winters are a bit snowy but pleasant. Spring in the Sonora is amazing (and for the most part, allergy-friendly). Summers are great in Northern Arizona not so much here in Tucson haha.

Also, don't move to Northern Arizona if you don't like weed. Stoners are everywhere even in retiree Prescott. Arizona will most likely legalize next month and while I don't think weed culture will be as pervasive as Oregon is right now, I am assuming Arizona will be the only "warm" state with legalization and that will attract quite a bit of people.
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Old 10-16-2016, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle aka tier 3 city :)
1,078 posts, read 963,153 times
Reputation: 683
When I first moved to Seattle 5 1/2 years ago the weather was dreadful that November - April, but that last 3 winters or so have been very mild and I have actually come to enjoy this weather more than SoCal weather.
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