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Old 10-14-2016, 02:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan2013 View Post
If sea levels rise high enough, then the New York City and Boston metros will both have flooding issues to contend with.
Not like in South Florida, where the highest point is 12 feet above MSL, or Southern Louisiana.
Some areas may have trouble (Mostly landfilled areas), but largely the regions will be fine.
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Old 10-14-2016, 02:22 PM
 
79 posts, read 78,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funtraveler1 View Post
Austin TX and cali with the droughts.
Ausin has a river running through it. I'd say Phoenix. They badly need to get their water situation figured out.
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Old 10-14-2016, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Pretty much any city in The Sun Belt potentially meets this description. The growing scarcity of water will be exacerbated by the inability of infrastructure improvements to keep up with population growth-rates.
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Old 10-14-2016, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,956 posts, read 2,767,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Not like in South Florida, where the highest point is 12 feet above MSL, or Southern Louisiana.
Some areas may have trouble (Mostly landfilled areas), but largely the regions will be fine.
Actually Miami proper is about 27 feet above MSL in some points and has a ridge just west of the bay / ocean. The barrier islands like Miami Beach already flood during King tides on the west side of the island.

I would say the New Orleans is the most environmentally/climatically screwed since it is already under sea level to begin with.
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Old 10-14-2016, 03:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
There are a handful of places in this country that are currently suffering or projected to suffer through dire climate change consequences in the coming decades, or environmental issues that make these places potentially less livable in the future. Which metropolitan areas do you think are at risk in this regard?

Here are the ones that I think are most at risk:

Miami - rapidly rising sea level

Phoenix - getting way too hot and way too dry; lack of water supply for the future

Las Vegas - too hot and too dry; lack of water supply for the future

Los Angeles - severe water drought to last for decades to come

San Diego - severe water drought to last for decades to come

Riverside - severe water drought to last for decades to come

Tucson - severe water drought to last for decades to come
Do you have extensive higher education coursework in physical geography, earth sciences, environmental sciences, climatology, etc or self taught by reading many textbooks, scholarly journal articles on your own?

If not, you are really not in the position to really address this.

Anyone who discusses the more catastrophic end of climate change projections and consequences without having a science background are approaching the issue in a way that more closely resembles religion than science.
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Old 10-14-2016, 05:51 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,266 posts, read 4,529,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
There are a handful of places in this country that are currently suffering or projected to suffer through dire climate change consequences in the coming decades, or environmental issues that make these places potentially less livable in the future. Which metropolitan areas do you think are at risk in this regard?

Here are the ones that I think are most at risk:

Miami - rapidly rising sea level

Phoenix - getting way too hot and way too dry; lack of water supply for the future

Las Vegas - too hot and too dry; lack of water supply for the future

Los Angeles - severe water drought to last for decades to come

San Diego - severe water drought to last for decades to come

Riverside - severe water drought to last for decades to come

Tucson - severe water drought to last for decades to come
Good list, I would add New Orleans.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,205 posts, read 10,443,694 times
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New Orleans. With global warming another Katrina-type situation is inevitable sometime this century.
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Old 10-15-2016, 02:50 PM
 
4,506 posts, read 2,691,410 times
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Geology should be tied in with basic elevations at sea level. Some cities can wall off the sea. Others are actively sinking, or in Miami's case has a groundwater issue that will get by any wall.
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Old 10-15-2016, 11:56 PM
 
2,558 posts, read 1,652,340 times
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New Orleans
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Old 10-16-2016, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,662,397 times
Reputation: 3630
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
There are a handful of places in this country that are currently suffering or projected to suffer through dire climate change consequences in the coming decades, or environmental issues that make these places potentially less livable in the future. Which metropolitan areas do you think are at risk in this regard?

Here are the ones that I think are most at risk:

Miami - rapidly rising sea level

Phoenix - getting way too hot and way too dry; lack of water supply for the future

Las Vegas - too hot and too dry; lack of water supply for the future

Los Angeles - severe water drought to last for decades to come

San Diego - severe water drought to last for decades to come

Riverside - severe water drought to last for decades to come

Tucson - severe water drought to last for decades to come
All of the ones you listed except Miami will be affected by the same issue, the Colorado River. The Department of the Interior should have facilitated a new treaty YESTERDAY given that California has been using more of their allotment for around 20 years to supply LA and SD but it'll probably happen when it's too late.

Since it's based on Colorado River water, let's throw in Albuquerque and Denver also to your list. I think SLC is too far north for the Colorado River but I do know the river does supply Saint George and other S. Utah communities. Wyoming also gets a very tiny slice of the Colorado River water for the same reason New Mexico does... has a feeder river or source to the river.
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