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Old 10-16-2016, 09:06 PM
 
6,552 posts, read 13,750,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Regarding the four cities mentioned and Southern culture, this assessment of Cincinnati is accurate, but regarding Cincinnati's connection to Kentucky overall, it's not. The city's tie-ins with Kentucky are enormous, and an Appalachian Kentucky sub-culture permeates numerous Cincinnati neighborhoods.
THIS....oh wait, you actually live there! I lived in Cincy too and travel there on the very regular.
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Old 10-16-2016, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Are you kidding me? Cincinnati isn't like Kentucky at all culturally, linguistically, historically, or demographically. It has Southern influences but to say it belongs in a Southern state before a Northern one is pure ignorance.
You realize that Cincinnati has a significant number of suburbs, as well as their airport, located in Kentucky? lol.

Cincinnati isn't southern but I think you're downplaying the overlap of culture between Northern Kentucky and Cincy.
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Old 10-17-2016, 08:08 AM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,460,670 times
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Cincinnati has sunnier weather, and a bit warmer. Pittsburgh gets more snow and has steeper hills - for some people this is a challenge for driving.

Pittsburgh has more rivers and thus more waterfront and bridges. It started as a colonial era fort/town and thus has older history, but it boomed later than Cincinnati - which boomed mostly in the 1800s. whereas Pittsburgh really began to boom more in the early 1900s. Thus in Pittsburgh you will find more Irish, Italian, and Eastern European descent from the Ellis Island era of immigration.

Cincy has more mid-sized metros quite close to it, whereas Pittsburgh is within driving distance to the major cities of the I95 corridor and the ocean.

Pittsburgh has more acclaimed universities and a large university culture, where Cincinnati is more of a corporate culture it seems.

Cincinnati's neighborhoods have a different feel to me than Pittsburgh's -- even though the architecture and urban fabric are not all that different in most cases. Not sure why this is.

Cincinnati has better highways in most areas, and a beltway; whereas Pittsburgh has light rail, rapid busways, and HOV lanes.

Last edited by _Buster; 10-17-2016 at 08:17 AM..
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Old 10-17-2016, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Pleasant Ridge)
594 posts, read 495,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
One major difference not mentioned is politics. Cinci proper isn't as conservative as its reputation, but this is in large part due to the big black population. There are several Republican neighborhoods within city limits, and really only two white liberal enclaves (one of which is a university district). In the City of Pittsburgh, in contrast, virtually everyone is a Democrat regardless of race or social class. I think McCain may have narrowly won two of the ninety neighborhoods, but Romney didn't win a single one, and I doubt Trump will win any.
This is simply not true. Obama won 80% of the vote in Cincy. Romney won some precincts in Mt Lookout, Hyde Park Columbia-Tusc and Sayler Park Obama won everywhere else, including majority white neighborhoods not near UC. The only neighborhoods that you could debate as being Republican would be Columbia-Tusc, Salyer Park, Mt Lookout and Hyde Park but if anything they're more purplish. So that's 4 of 52 neighborhoods. I frustratingly couldn't find a map showing this but attached is a Hamilton County map from the Auditors race and it's basically the exact same as a Romney/Obama map would look.

And a map with place names. You can clearly see the sea blue covers nearly all of the city.

Last edited by cincydave8; 10-17-2016 at 09:04 AM..
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Old 10-17-2016, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,917,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cincydave8 View Post
This is simply not true. Obama won 80% of the vote in Cincy. Romney won some precincts in Mt Lookout, Hyde Park Columbia-Tusc and Sayler Park Obama won everywhere else, including majority white neighborhoods not near UC. The only neighborhoods that you could debate as being Republican would be Columbia-Tusc, Salyer Park, Mt Lookout and Hyde Park but if anything they're more purplish. So that's 4 of 52 neighborhoods. I frustratingly couldn't find a map showing this but attached is a Hamilton County map from the Auditors race and it's basically the exact same as a Romney/Obama map would look.

And a map with place names. You can clearly see the sea blue covers nearly all of the city.
I took a look at the data on a precinct-by-precinct basis awhile ago with an app which unfortunately is out of commission at the moment. The only highly white areas of the city which were heavily Obama voting (like two thirds or more) were some areas around the University of Cincinnati and Clifton. Cincinnati is actually fairly well integrated, insofar as most of its white neighborhoods have not insubstantial black populations. In most of these other white neighborhoods Obama's margins were narrow enough that it's likely without the local black population the neighborhoods would be Republican-majority.

Regardless, the overall point stands. In Pittsburgh within city limits everywhere votes for Democrats by some margin, from the black neighborhoods to the rich white neighborhoods to the 95% white working-class neighborhoods. Cincinnati is more conservative, so that isn't as universal of a trait.
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Old 10-17-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
5,950 posts, read 7,319,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I took a look at the data on a precinct-by-precinct basis awhile ago with an app which unfortunately is out of commission at the moment. The only highly white areas of the city which were heavily Obama voting (like two thirds or more) were some areas around the University of Cincinnati and Clifton. Cincinnati is actually fairly well integrated, insofar as most of its white neighborhoods have not insubstantial black populations. In most of these other white neighborhoods Obama's margins were narrow enough that it's likely without the local black population the neighborhoods would be Republican-majority.

Regardless, the overall point stands. In Pittsburgh within city limits everywhere votes for Democrats by some margin, from the black neighborhoods to the rich white neighborhoods to the 95% white working-class neighborhoods. Cincinnati is more conservative, so that isn't as universal of a trait.
Looking at the presidential voting patterns of Allegheny and Hamilton Counties, Allegheny County is certainly a tad more left leaning. Hamilton County only was won by the Democrats once until 2008. To also go along with your point that the white people of Pittsburgh are more left leaning than those of Cincinnati, Hamilton County is only 69% white while Allegheny County is 80% white.


Allegheny County, PA
Year Democratic Republican
2012 56.54% 352,687 42.01% 269,039
2008 57.20% 368,453 41.89% 269,819
2004 57.15% 368,912 42.13% 271,925
2000 56.65% 329,963 40.41% 235,361
1996 52.82% 284,480 37.89% 204,067
1992 52.75% 324,004 29.80% 183,035
1988 59.51% 348,814 39.43% 231,137
1984 55.96% 372,576 42.76% 284,692
1980 47.87% 297,464 43.75% 271,850
1976 50.68% 328,343 46.79% 303,127
1972 42.26% 282,496 55.60% 371,737
1968 51.12% 364,906 37.09% 264,790
1964 66.03% 475,207 33.58% 241,707
1960 57.07% 428,455 42.76% 320,970


Hamilton County, OH
Year Republican Democratic
2012 46.2% 193,326 52.5% 219,927
2008 46.0% 195,530 53.0% 225,213
2004 52.5% 222,616 47.1% 199,679
2000 54.0% 204,175 42.8% 161,578
1996 50.1% 186,493 43.1% 160,458
1992 47.7% 192,447 36.8% 148,409
1988 61.3% 227,004 37.9% 140,354
1984 63.3% 246,288 36.1% 140,350
1980 57.7% 206,979 36.0% 129,114
1976 59.8% 211,267 38.4% 135,605
1972 65.6% 239,212 32.7% 119,054
1968 50.2% 183,611 37.0% 135,057
1964 44.7% 161,179 55.3% 199,127
1960 54.5% 211,068 45.5% 176,215
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Old 10-17-2016, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,225,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjmars View Post
Cincinnati has a lot in common with Kentucky. it really doesn't have much of a shared bond with "Ohio" so to speak.
Sorry that's wrong. Culturally, linguistically, demographically, and historically Cincinnati has more in common with the rest of Ohio and very little in common with Kentucky.
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Old 10-17-2016, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,225,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
You realize that Cincinnati has a significant number of suburbs, as well as their airport, located in Kentucky? lol.

Cincinnati isn't southern but I think you're downplaying the overlap of culture between Northern Kentucky and Cincy.
Northern Kentucky in the Cincinnati suburbs isn't Southern.
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Old 10-17-2016, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,225,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krisps View Post
Pitt is east southern while Cincy is west southern, basically West Virginia vs Kentucky. Hilly is common but different type. Cincy seems to sit in a bowl, pretty interesting topo. Cincy has horses... hello Kentucky.
Neither Pittsburgh nor Cincinnati are Southern.
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Old 10-17-2016, 07:02 PM
 
5,682 posts, read 8,754,172 times
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Quote:
Northern Kentucky in the Cincinnati suburbs isn't Southern.
The newer suburbs are generic American, but Covington and Newport are like nothing I've seen in the south.

I was thinking architecturally but now I remember sitting in a greasy spoon in Covington and the working class patrons I overheard were democrats!

Both are great cities.
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