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Old 10-16-2016, 05:24 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,042 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63743

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
The numbers you're utilizing are against the federal minimum wage which is a ridiculous $7.25 an hour. 26% of all Americans earn less than $10.55 an hour, which is less than $22,000 per year and still speaks to the "minimum wage" as it's higher than $7.25 an hour in most heavily populated areas. 75% of those working in that salary range are adults (age 20 or higher) and 34% of that overall group are parents with children.

Demographics of Low-Wage Workers | Raise The Minimum Wage
The majority of those workers are working part time. And also, the majority who work part time are doing so for NON economic reasons.

Employed and unemployed full- and part-time workers by age, sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity
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Old 10-16-2016, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,349,117 times
Reputation: 970
When set on "Parent and Spouse with two children", Ohio is the most affordable state.
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Old 10-16-2016, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27733
I live in a cheap county in TN and no matter where you live, the $10/hr or so it says is the minimum is going to suck anywhere.
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Old 10-16-2016, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27733
Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
When set on "Parent and Spouse with two children", Ohio is the most affordable state.
One thing about the Midwest is that you have as low or a lower cost living than much of the South, but also higher wages.
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Old 10-17-2016, 07:14 AM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,773,617 times
Reputation: 46045
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
The Living Wage Map

Very cool map that shows some of the most affordable and least affordable counties for us low wage workers... using MIT's living wage calculator
Living Wage Calculator

The south being such a cheap place, is actually not so cheap when they have such low minimum wages... low wage workers are better off in parts of California than most of the south

Washington state is by far the most affordable where the minimum wage is set above the living wage.

Wonder what this map will look like with the minimum wage hikes in New York & California?
Well, when you look at the government's ACCRA that takes into account cost of living by region, as opposed to this map which was created to serve a political agenda, places such as California, New York, and New Jersey, et al, are actually at rock bottom in terms of discretionary income. I mean, when research shows that 85% of all homes in California are off-limits to a schoolteacher's salary, that's a much bigger problem.

Further, minimum wage workers are a tiny fraction of the workforce, around 3% of the total workforce. Further roughly half of those earning minimum wage are below 25, and the bulk of those 19 and under. The service industries are also heavily represented, chiefly because revenues from tips make up a lot.

So if you're above 19 and still earning minimum wage and not waiting tables or mixing drinks, chances are you really need to acquire skills and other qualities attractive to employers. Because that's what's going to get you a bigger paycheck, not a government mandate.

Last edited by cpg35223; 10-17-2016 at 07:26 AM..
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Old 10-17-2016, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,897,970 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Well, when you look at the government's ACCRA that takes into account cost of living by region, as opposed to this map which was created to serve a political agenda, places such as California, New York, and New Jersey, et al, are actually at rock bottom in terms of discretionary income. I mean, when research shows that 85% of all homes in California are off-limits to a schoolteacher's salary, that's a much bigger problem.

Further, minimum wage workers are a tiny fraction of the workforce, around 3% of the total workforce. Further roughly half of those earning minimum wage are below 25, and the bulk of those 19 and under. The service industries are also heavily represented, chiefly because revenues from tips make up a lot.

So if you're above 19 and still earning minimum wage and not waiting tables or mixing drinks, chances are you really need to acquire skills and other qualities attractive to employers. Because that's what's going to get you a bigger paycheck, not a government mandate.
The real big problem is housing supply is too low. At the end of the day, the buck stops at housing for COL, and thanks to stupid NIMBYs, housing supply gets held below demand, just so said NIMBYs can make a windfall when they finally sell. Lower housing costs and wages and prices would not need to keep going up
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Old 10-18-2016, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27733
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
The real big problem is housing supply is too low. At the end of the day, the buck stops at housing for COL, and thanks to stupid NIMBYs, housing supply gets held below demand, just so said NIMBYs can make a windfall when they finally sell. Lower housing costs and wages and prices would not need to keep going up
Not saying the NIMBYism isn't a problem, but many of the rich, prestigious areas of the country are hemmed in by some sort of natural barrier and land availability is low.

You can't build around San Francisco or Seattle the way you can Indianapolis or Columbus. That's a huge reason why prices are high in these major areas.
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,569 posts, read 12,686,899 times
Reputation: 8334
I wonder how much online commerce affects the COL these days. Compared to the past, when almost everything was priced locally such as housing, utilities, taxes, food, and clothing, today many things are available online. And the prices are the same whether you live in Manhattan, NY or Manhattan, KS. Of course, with housing, utilities, and taxes usually making up the biggest part of ones budget, online purchases ares not going to change ones COL dramatically. However, with the growth of Amazon and other online retailers, food, clothing, furniture, household items, etc. cost virtually the same no matter where you live. This is beneficial to those who live in high cost/high income cities.

For example, buying a 32-roll pack of toilet paper on Amazon costs the same whether you live in Los Angeles or in Des Moines. Buying an LL Bean bathing suit is the same cost to someone in DC as it is to someone in Spartanburg, SC. Streaming movies cost the same to someone in Chicago as to someone in Columbus. And although not related to online commerce, a vacation in Paris, France costs the same to a person in NYC as it does to a person in Omaha, Nebraska (excluding transportation to and from, which usually benefits the big city in any case).

In some ways, you are better off living in a high income area because "everything else" (mostly after housing) is more affordable to you compared to someone in a low income area.
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,897,970 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Not saying the NIMBYism isn't a problem, but many of the rich, prestigious areas of the country are hemmed in by some sort of natural barrier and land availability is low.

You can't build around San Francisco or Seattle the way you can Indianapolis or Columbus. That's a huge reason why prices are high in these major areas.
There is a crap ton of land on the SF peninsula as well as in Marin, Napa and Sonoma Co's that is completely undeveloped due to the Urban Growth Boundary. Even if you left the UGB, you could densify already built in areas, especially in Santa Clara Co, but again, the NIMBYs
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