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View Poll Results: What states do you consider Southwestern?
Arizona 96 96.97%
California 34 34.34%
Colorado 20 20.20%
Hawaii 1 1.01%
Kansas 1 1.01%
Nevada 47 47.47%
New Mexico 96 96.97%
Oklahoma 21 21.21%
Texas 36 36.36%
Utah 29 29.29%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 99. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-17-2016, 05:12 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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New Mexico, Arizona, the southern tier of Colorado, the four-corners region of Utah, trans-Pecos Texas.

That's it. No California, no Nevada, no Oklahoma. No the rest of Texas.

I go with the geographic definition which incorporates an overlap of physiographic and cultural criteria.

This criteria is described as an area settled by Spanish, and later, Mexican people who live in an area with an intact and robust indigenous Native American population in one of three physiographic regions: the Chihuahuan desert, the Sonoran desert, and the Colorado Plateau.

If you are in one of those regions and the aformentioned ethno-cultural grouping is present, then you are in the "American Southwest" as opposed to the southwestern quadrant of the USA.
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Old 10-17-2016, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
New Mexico, Arizona, the southern tier of Colorado, the four-corners region of Utah, trans-Pecos Texas.

That's it. No California, no Nevada, no Oklahoma. No the rest of Texas.

I go with the geographic definition which incorporates an overlap of physiographic and cultural criteria.

This criteria is described as an area settled by Spanish, and later, Mexican people who live in an area with an intact and robust indigenous Native American population in one of three physiographic regions: the Chihuahuan desert, the Sonoran desert, and the Colorado Plateau.

If you are in one of those regions and the aformentioned ethno-cultural grouping is present, then you are in the "American Southwest" as opposed to the southwestern quadrant of the USA.
If you want to include the Sonoran, that also includes SEern CA. And you don't consider the Mojave part of the SW?
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Old 10-17-2016, 05:54 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
If you want to include the Sonoran, that also includes SEern CA. And you don't consider the Mojave part of the SW?
This. Southern California outside of the coastal megalopolis (LA-Orange County-San Diego) meets most if not all of the criteria to be considered Southwestern.
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Old 10-17-2016, 05:59 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Arkansas, and Oklahoma east of US 75 are definitely Southern. Tulsa is at the western edge of what I consider "The South"
I would extend that a little bit westward to I-35 at least. I would say US 183 would be even better. It's only the far western quarter of the state where Southernness starts to diminish. Even then, it's still strong all the way to the Texas/New Mexico border.
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Old 10-17-2016, 06:00 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
If you want to include the Sonoran, that also includes SEern CA. And you don't consider the Mojave part of the SW?
While the Sonoran desert does extend into the extreme southeastern corner of California, the region lacks the ethnocultural component that is intrinsic to the definition of the American Southwest. Palm Springs and the communities around the Salton Sea do not typify Southwestern culture.

This map, a map of pre-contact peoples, corresponds with the region I consider the Southwest. It is the mingling of Spanish and Mexican people with the cultures depicted on this map (plus the later arriving Navajo and Apache) that creates the uniquely definable region.

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Old 10-17-2016, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
They may have come from the East but they were placed in Oklahoma. Sadly, in modern times, the Native population of the eastern United States have been eradicated for the most part and the biggest remnants of their culture, is the names of towns and rivers in some states. The majority of American Indians in the year 2016 lives in the western half of the United States. http://www.educationworld.com/a_imag...lation_map.gif They may have Eastern heritage but they've been living west of the Mississippi for generations now. Just like we wouldn't say that New Jersey is part of the Mediterranean just because a lot of its population originally came from Italy. Native Americans born and raised in Oklahoma will be more influenced by the environment of where they actually live, than where their original tribes came from.
I still have to respectfully disagree from your post. Having a large Native American population doesn't automatically give Oklahoma a Southwest identity, especially eastern and southeastern Oklahoma because those tribes have their roots in the South and helped shape Southern culture. With them, the tribes (the Five Civilized tribes, in particular) brought their food, (which is the origin of a lot of Southern cuisine), their religion, and even their slaves to Oklahoma. I'm Native American (Choctaw) and was born and raised in southeastern Oklahoma. I'd identify myself as Southern because that's where our culture stems from, that's what was brought during removal and is still prevalent today.
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Old 10-17-2016, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Arch City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayneMo View Post
I just don't feel the same way. Hailing from Little Dixie and having been all over most of Oklahoma, OKC and northward feel more Midwestern to me (linguistically and culturally) and more so than Tulsa while Tulsa feels more southern.
Oklahoma City is not the Midwest linguistically or culturally.
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Old 10-17-2016, 07:03 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,252,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
New Mexico, Arizona, the southern tier of Colorado, the four-corners region of Utah, trans-Pecos Texas.

That's it. No California, no Nevada, no Oklahoma. No the rest of Texas.

I go with the geographic definition which incorporates an overlap of physiographic and cultural criteria.

This criteria is described as an area settled by Spanish, and later, Mexican people who live in an area with an intact and robust indigenous Native American population in one of three physiographic regions: the Chihuahuan desert, the Sonoran desert, and the Colorado Plateau.

If you are in one of those regions and the aformentioned ethno-cultural grouping is present, then you are in the "American Southwest" as opposed to the southwestern quadrant of the USA.
Western Texas' Amerindian population is no more robust than in the rest of the state. Unless you mean Hispanics, many of whom have mixed heritage, but San Antonio and southern Texas would also apply.
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Old 10-17-2016, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,865,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I would extend that a little bit westward to I-35 at least. I would say US 183 would be even better. It's only the far western quarter of the state where Southernness starts to diminish. Even then, it's still strong all the way to the Texas/New Mexico border.
I really think US 75/I-45 is the westward limit, and from there to US 83 is a transition zone to the SW. The Piney Woods and swamps don't go west of 75/45, and the vegetation in OKC and DFW is noticeably more western than in say Shreveport/Tulsa/Jackson
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Old 10-17-2016, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,972 posts, read 12,486,400 times
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Southern CA, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico
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