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Old 10-26-2016, 12:32 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,027 posts, read 1,987,034 times
Reputation: 1719

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Coastal dweller here!

The only times when I feel detached from reality are Saturday nights and Wednesday afternoons!
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Old 10-26-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,220,119 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Mantegna View Post
Not to make this political but if your theory is true I find it amusing in an ironic way that the person middle America has chosen to represent their interests (speaking in a general sense here) is a billionaire from NYC
Yeah, but he's a blue-collar billionaire.

Jerry Falwell Jr. Tells GOP Delegates: Trump Is 'America's Blue Collar Billionaire' - Breitbart
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Old 10-26-2016, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,377,878 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Of course the Costcos are doing well on the coasts, largely among affluent suburban populations living in larger homes. Their customer base aren't the well-off urban or the poor urban crammed into small units. The truly urban often look down at big box retail with disdain.

If someone is living in a small apartment, it may be all they can afford. It may be because they want closer proximity to work or the city scene. These reasons are all valid and there's nothing wrong with it. Regardless, someone who has lived and worked in urban NYC/SF/Boston etc., is going to have a vastly different lifestyle than people in much of the rest of the country. That's not putting a value judgment on it - it's a simple fact. But they're not going to fill up that 400 - 600 sq. ft space with bulk purchases from Costco. I moved to Indianapolis a few years ago for a job. Several of my colleagues were living in hip apartment complexes in the city and just bought a few things at a time at Whole Foods - they thought I was nuts for having a Costco membership, but to me, buying in bulk was routine.

Whether the pickup is bought or rented isn't really material - the main cultural difference is that someone in the coastal, urban areas probably doesn't own the truck nor will they rent one and do the work themselves - they will hire someone with a truck to perform the service. I've had some old furniture stored at my parents' house we hauled off recently after I moved back to Tennessee. We rented a pickup, but hauled the furniture to the dump ourselves.

The richest areas of the country, by far, tend to be urban, coastal areas. That's not saying that everyone in the rich, coastal cities is rich individually, or that everyone in flyover country is dead broke, but there is a definite difference of affluence between the elite coastal cities (BOSWASH corridor, most of the CA coastal cities/Portland/Seattle) and most of the rest of the country.
I recently threw out a couch (a sectional) and just dragged it to the curb-the garbage collectors took it. Usually there are also people driving around in trucks that will grab metal and furniture, etc. before the garbage collectors even come.

But I have rented a U-Haul many times, and have friends with trucks that I have used on occasion as well.
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Old 10-26-2016, 03:45 PM
 
539 posts, read 404,405 times
Reputation: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Mantegna View Post
Not to make this political but if your theory is true I find it amusing in an ironic way that the person middle America has chosen to represent their interests (speaking in a general sense here) is a billionaire from NYC
It's insane. The Clintons (while they are the establishment) are both from VERY humble roots while Trump was born into tons of money in NYC and is married to an immigrant not sure how he is the guy they pick to represent them
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Old 10-27-2016, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,630,168 times
Reputation: 2893
Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingFar View Post
Well, why would you?? If I lived in Kansas or Chicago, I wouldn't have paid what I did for my house in San Francisco simply because there are other options. A $1 million house is pretty much entry level is Silicon Valley.

At any rate, I'm not sure stagnant home prices is something the OP should brag about. Conversely, while there's a little bit of supply and demand at play, it's not really about the coasts being more desireable. It's that the coasts have job markets that are better positioned in a knowledge-based economy. The collapse of manufacturing has hit Middle America hard -- some cities have retained their relevance and others have languished. And certainly if you look at cities like Denver, Austin, Nashville, home prices are increasingly dramatically alongside tech and healthcare job growth. Those cities have more room to sprawl (unlike NY and SF) but it sure feels like a party in those places.
A knowledge based on economy based on health care which is majority government subsidized or tax deductable which is indirect government stimulus via tax deductions. Bio-Technology firms have extremely high failure rates and it would be interesting to see the percentage of these technology firms that started during this latest bubble are actually turning a profit each quarter.

Much of the knowledge based economy is either government spending, government subsidies, debt and speculation.

I think it is just a massive bubble in these coastal areas. It seems as though ultra-low interest rates primarily benefit large cities and many of the large cities are on the coasts.

Many of these newer coastal start-up's don't even make a profit. Compare that to a business like a farm and manufacturing operation that has to make money.

Many of these coastal biotechnology and technology firms on the coasts will fail anyway at some time or another. Just a huge massive bubble in places like California and the BosWash corridor due to the lowest interest rates in history and the biggest debt run-up in the history of the country.
Healthcare job growth is basically government subsidized job growth with a vast majority being government spending or lost revenue from tax decductions

Tax-funded expenditures accounted for 64 percent of U.S. health spending.

Government funds nearly two-thirds of U.S. health care costs: American Journal of Public Health study | Physicians for a National Health Program.

Biotechnology firms have very, very high failure rates.

Technology firms are going on a huge debt buying spree up 42% from a year ago.

Rich tech firms can't get enough of this

California has a much larger unfunded pension liability then it thinks, some flyover states have small unfunded pensions.

http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-...e77313297.html

I will be very interesting to see what happens if there is another large recession at the same that these huge cities on the coasts are having to pay for the pensions of the retirees and they also have hire replacement government workers with high compensation packages.

Last edited by lovecrowds; 10-27-2016 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 10-27-2016, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,377,878 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelers1523 View Post
It's insane. The Clintons (while they are the establishment) are both from VERY humble roots while Trump was born into tons of money in NYC and is married to an immigrant not sure how he is the guy they pick to represent them
HRC is not from "very humble" roots; she grew up in a wealthy Chicago suburb.


I don't see how Democrats-supposedly the "Anti-War" and economic justice party-can pick a warmonger and Wall Street Puppet like HRC to represent them.


This election is insanity.
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Old 10-27-2016, 04:59 PM
 
539 posts, read 404,405 times
Reputation: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
HRC is not from "very humble" roots; she grew up in a wealthy Chicago suburb.


I don't see how Democrats-supposedly the "Anti-War" and economic justice party-can pick a warmonger and Wall Street Puppet like HRC to represent them.


This election is insanity.
Very humble roots for her may be an exaggeration but comparing a successful textile worker to The Trumps makes it seem very humble in comparison. I choose the better of the 2 options. I don't claim to be anti-war. I do know the last time we had a republican president our country's economy went to ****.
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Old 10-28-2016, 06:49 AM
 
97 posts, read 84,434 times
Reputation: 41
Austin TX here. I wouldn't say I'm detached from reality. Being with the west coast is nice tho.
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Old 10-29-2016, 12:02 AM
 
90 posts, read 121,562 times
Reputation: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
A knowledge based on economy based on health care which is majority government subsidized or tax deductable which is indirect government stimulus via tax deductions. Bio-Technology firms have extremely high failure rates and it would be interesting to see the percentage of these technology firms that started during this latest bubble are actually turning a profit each quarter.

Much of the knowledge based economy is either government spending, government subsidies, debt and speculation.

I think it is just a massive bubble in these coastal areas. It seems as though ultra-low interest rates primarily benefit large cities and many of the large cities are on the coasts.

Many of these newer coastal start-up's don't even make a profit. Compare that to a business like a farm and manufacturing operation that has to make money.

Many of these coastal biotechnology and technology firms on the coasts will fail anyway at some time or another. Just a huge massive bubble in places like California and the BosWash corridor due to the lowest interest rates in history and the biggest debt run-up in the history of the country.
Healthcare job growth is basically government subsidized job growth with a vast majority being government spending or lost revenue from tax decductions

Tax-funded expenditures accounted for 64 percent of U.S. health spending.

Government funds nearly two-thirds of U.S. health care costs: American Journal of Public Health study | Physicians for a National Health Program.

Biotechnology firms have very, very high failure rates.

Technology firms are going on a huge debt buying spree up 42% from a year ago.

Rich tech firms can't get enough of this

California has a much larger unfunded pension liability then it thinks, some flyover states have small unfunded pensions.

California

I will be very interesting to see what happens if there is another large recession at the same that these huge cities on the coasts are having to pay for the pensions of the retirees and they also have hire replacement government workers with high compensation packages.
I see the point you're trying to make but it's kind of moot. Globalization and Technology have shifted industry and employment in a way where we will only become more efficient and if anything, lose jobs overall or become a more service oriented economy. So, these coastal hubs, which now are our largest and most prosperous cities, become almost permanently booming places. The coastal cities are too connected with too much business and levels of economy to be a bubble and "burst." Not only because of their status in the US but also globally. Many cities in middle america don't have that global recognition and that's a hard part to play catch up on.

If anything, the climate will change some things, lol. But in closing, more people live in coastal areas and they're the most profitable cities for us. I think their reality is just fine.
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Old 10-29-2016, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
Reputation: 27576
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
I recently threw out a couch (a sectional) and just dragged it to the curb-the garbage collectors took it. Usually there are also people driving around in trucks that will grab metal and furniture, etc. before the garbage collectors even come.

But I have rented a U-Haul many times, and have friends with trucks that I have used on occasion as well.
In rural areas, often not. If I haul it to the curb, it's likely to stay there.
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