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View Poll Results: How do you feel about your current city?
Love it here, setting up roots in the area 125 50.81%
Its alright, im content for now 73 29.67%
Hate it or highly dislike it here.. Im leaving as soon as possible 48 19.51%
Voters: 246. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-30-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,853 posts, read 2,978,355 times
Reputation: 3399

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Count me in the "love it" category. Lived in Colorado from age 10 'til age 25. At that point I hated it and wanted out. So I moved to Dallas.

Lived in DFW for 12 years before getting tired of the sprawl, how hot it is from June-September, and how bloody ugly and bland the countryside is in that part of the country.

Moved back to Colorado almost 6 years ago and wish I'd done it sooner. Living in Texas gave me a big appreciation for how much better my quality of life is here.
I think it's amazing how the average high can still be 90 in a lot of parts of Texas in September.
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Old 03-30-2017, 11:19 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,369,908 times
Reputation: 10919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
I've always wanted to live in Ann Arbor. Doubt it will ever happen, but yeah. And I've never even been to Michigan. Seems irrational I know.
My husband and his sister went to school in Ann Arbor and she still lives there. Growing up in a college town, Iowa City, I've always loved the atmosphere. I really love Ann Arbor, it's a top notch town with a lot going on, and 4,500,000 people living in the Detroit area just down the street.

I didn't think much of Michigan until I married into the state (we live in Chicago, but go to Michigan all the time). Most people just think of inner city Detroit, but the other 98% of the state is awesome. Great towns, all the beaches and surrounded by great lakes, its an amazing state.

I would live there.
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Old 03-30-2017, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,346 posts, read 7,420,095 times
Reputation: 6783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
I've always wanted to live in Ann Arbor. Doubt it will ever happen, but yeah. And I've never even been to Michigan. Seems irrational I know.
I was actually in Ann Arbor when I read this today.

Ann Arbor is unique, to say the least. I have heard locals refer to it as "twenty-eight square miles surrounded by reality".

It is a very nice, attractive city with tons of amenities, if a tad expensive, and it's hard to find housing sometimes because of all the people who want to be there. If we were above average in wealth and my husband liked densely populated cities, I would love to move to Ann Arbor too. There is always something "artsy" going on, the donwtown is fun and quirky, the campus is beautiful, and the variety of ethnic dining options is amazing. Lots of interesting historical housing stock and great metroparks too.
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Old 03-30-2017, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,346 posts, read 7,420,095 times
Reputation: 6783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
My husband and his sister went to school in Ann Arbor and she still lives there. Growing up in a college town, Iowa City, I've always loved the atmosphere. I really love Ann Arbor, it's a top notch town with a lot going on, and 4,500,000 people living in the Detroit area just down the street.

I didn't think much of Michigan until I married into the state (we live in Chicago, but go to Michigan all the time). Most people just think of inner city Detroit, but the other 98% of the state is awesome. Great towns, all the beaches and surrounded by great lakes, its an amazing state.

I would live there.
I like how you pointed out that people who have never been to Michigan just think of inner city Detroit...so true! Detroit makes up, like, .0001% of the entire state, and even all of Detroit isn't terrible. The downtown and several neighborhoods like Midtown, the Stadium District, and Corktown are making a remarkable resurgence and there is literally a wait list to get into housing in many parts of these neighborhoods. Detroit also has some of the wealthiest, safest suburbs in the U.S.

I think people forget that the upper 2/3 of the Lower Peninsula and the entire Upper Peninsula are relatively sparsely populated except for gems like Traverse City, Mackinaw City, and Harbor Springs. People who picture Michigan as one big inner city with factories couldn't possibly be more mistaken. It is lush, and green, and lovely here and the lakes and beaches are amazing.

Like I said, I'm a transplant, but I love it here and consider myself a Mitten lovin' local after moving here twenty years ago.
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Old 03-31-2017, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Austin, Merry Old land of Oz
58 posts, read 37,572 times
Reputation: 109
Default Austin PS

Another PS RE: Austin -- I just keep thinking of things I left out in my initial, long post. Another CON:

Pollen. Allergens. Austin has been called the allergy capital of the US more than once. There's always *something* in the air that's aggravating to a lot of people, or some people, besides the rising air pollution ("ozone action days" we call them down here) or the annual haze from Mexican farmers burning off their croplands.

"Cedar fever" is a condition that strikes many from December through February, usually conveniently peaking during the Christmas holiday time. Misleadingly, this is pollen from the juniper tree (locally called cedar), which is inescapable. It might take a few years' exposure to develop a susceptibility toward it, but it results in bad hay fever, headaches, sniffles and swollen, watery eyes and sneezing, all the classic symptoms. Then ragweed pollen is high in August-Sept. Oak pollen is high right now. Grasses and other pollens.. The weathermen give allergy counts every day on local news broadcasts and tell us about the air quality. So be aware of that, sensitive breathers.
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Old 04-08-2017, 11:04 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,288 times
Reputation: 10
I think it is not where you live but your personal satisfaction to your connections (such as your social circle and work). You can live in an amazing place but be lonely and hate it.
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Old 04-15-2017, 10:53 PM
 
Location: East of the Appaichans
325 posts, read 207,464 times
Reputation: 353
DC area--pros
Museums, nearby mountains and parks, jobs (especially in VA where I am located)
Cons--Traffic! High housing costs, especially closer to DC.
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Old 04-16-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,820 posts, read 12,324,125 times
Reputation: 4768
I truly love living in the Charleston, West Virginia area, especially my rural area just outside the city. I love how the cost of living is low, hows there's very little traffic (the only time there is a real traffic jam is when there is a major wreck on Interstate 64 which I usually don't take and these wrecks are usually due to out of state truckers). There is very little crime and violence here unlike the Baltimore area where I used to live. Also even compared to my former blue collar community in Baltimore County, people in this part of WV have more traditional values, still believe in good families and church is major part of life for many people which I believe is a good thing. And we mostly have a good conservative, low-tax government that also respects our religious freedoms and is willing to openly stand up to the federal government on issues like the EPA and the war on coal.

A typical weekend is spent fishing, hunting, shooting guns in the holler, 4 wheeling or going to the local tavern with friends to watch a WVU game or going to a dirt track to watch auto racing. At the same time, I'm only 15-20 minutes away from Charleston and all the major restaurants, movie theaters, the casino etc. The city has a number of festivals and sporting events every year including a big car show and weekly free concerts in the summer.

As an Asian American originally from the Deep South I feel free to be myself without having to tread on eggshells like in liberal areas (like when I went to college in the DC suburbs). Nobody thinks its weird that my ethnicity isn't particularly important to me and that I like all-American things like country music and NASCAR and that my favorite foods are all traditional American. When I went to college near DC people would accuse me of being white or being too "American" and not being true to "my culture". (again I was born in the South and that is my primary culture)I can be open about being a Christian, about being pro-life and can fly the Confederate flag without anyone taking issue with it. I've made so many close friends here and this area is very friendly and very easy to make friends in as long as a newcomer makes an effort to fit in and respect the culture here. People from other states move here at a slow enough rate that they assimilate into the culture, rather than overwhelm the local culture like New Yorkers in Charlotte and Atlanta and Californians in Nevada and Arizona. I guess if someone is extremely politically correct and is easily offended(I was in a professional business meeting and the speaker make such a joke about Bruce Jenner becoming Caitlin and everyone laughed) or if you absolutely need your Whole Foods and Trader Joes you may not like it here as much.

The only two negatives are the weather and the job situation. Now granted there are many places like far worse winters than here, and within West Virginia, the Charleston and Huntington areas are considered rather mild and less snowy compared to the heart of the Appalachian chain which runs through the central and eastern part of the state. For example Beckley often gets a foot more of snow than Charleston. However, I prefer a more southern climate like that found in South Carolina and Georgia.

WIth jobs, the war on coal by the Obama administration has devastated the coal industry which affects all sectors of the state. The coal industry's severence taxes to the state government have decreased causing a budget crisis and with some miners forcing to leave to find work, its reduced business in general for other sectors like stores, restaurants, hospitals, etc. Because of this, I may be moving back to Louisiana where I was born. And that is another state I loved living in though crime and illegal immigration has increased dramatically in the past decade for example with the violence that took place in Baton Rouge after the criminal Alton Sterling was killed resisting arrest.
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Old 04-16-2017, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
292 posts, read 284,552 times
Reputation: 322
I love living in Houston. Very big, very diverse, very cosmopolitan and very well designed road network. Also, almost everything is built big here. Big churches, big stadiums, big skyscrapers.
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Old 04-17-2017, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,026 posts, read 54,523,130 times
Reputation: 66369
I like where I am...for now. I live in coastal New Jersey, not in a beach town but about five miles inland. The biggest advantage, of course, is accessibility to the ocean all year round. Other advantages is that it's a relatively short trip to New York City, where I worked, yet far enough from the city that you can leave the urban scene behind. If you don't feel like looking at the ocean, you go the other way and drive through the beauty of the thoroughbred horse farms. Lots of wooded areas and parks, too.

There's a music and art vibe here that permeates everything--local artists' work hangs in the hair salon, in the spice and tea shop, and there are always "art walks" and fairs displaying local art and photography. This is Springsteen and Bon Jovi country, but even if you're not fans, there's always some kind of music venue that has something for everyone. In summer, the NJ Jazz and Blues association puts on free concerts in parks and on the beaches.

Downside is traffic, which is pretty much a problem in all of New Jersey, but in the summer, it gets worse down here. To be expected in a beach area, though.

The other downside that applies to New Jersey in general is that it's one of the most expensive places to live in the country. For that reason and because of the density of the population, I probably will bail out of the state someday. But my mother is still alive and she has lived in the northern part of the state her whole life and isn't going anywhere, so while she's still here, so am I.
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