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Old 10-27-2016, 02:37 PM
PDF PDF started this thread
 
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Obviously, we're never (maybe?) going to have our perfect weather climate. But usually when moving, we often face a compromise between weather and city. You may have a job offer in a city you like, but the weather sucks. Or you often see people on here cross off cities for relocation even if they like the city, but the weather is terrible.

I actually prefer cold weather. So in my case, it should have been relatively easy to move somewhere with a cold climate...but I kept getting stuck in warm weather cities. I suppose living somewhere with warm weather is harder to attain than living in a cold climate.

I'm a Florida native (Tampa) and I can't stand heat/humidity. After that, I moved to Los Angeles. I definitely like the SoCal climate, but unless you were near the water it was just too hot for me at times. Plus it'd be hot during the day but you'd need a jacket as soon as the soon drop. Didn't get cold enough for me...I guess constant 60's/70's can get pretty boring.

I also lived in Sydney, Australia, and Raleigh, NC. Now I'm living in NYC where I finally have the weather I want! Raleigh was the closest...turns out I'm a 4 seasons kind of person. But I really like snow, and a very cold winter. Maybe one day I'll move to Minneapolis...that'd be the perfect climate for me.

What about you? I'm just a bit surprised that looking back now, it was amazing how I kept getting stuck in hot climates.
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Old 10-27-2016, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Big Bayou
721 posts, read 299,167 times
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I'm happy anywhere that doesn't experience a real winter. After college, I moved to Southern California then Hawaii, then SE Asia then Florida, and I have loved the weather in each place. Below 60 F and I start to feel too cold.
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Old 10-27-2016, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,860,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soursop View Post
I'm happy anywhere that doesn't experience a real winter. After college, I moved to Southern California then Hawaii, then SE Asia then Florida, and I have loved the weather in each place. Below 60 F and I start to feel too cold.
Repped you, moved to Phoenix as soon as I could, eventually moving to SoCal
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Old 10-27-2016, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,401,284 times
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I try to find the beauty/positives in all four seasons. I will admit that winter does start to drag on in Ohio after holidays by the time you get to February.

I really like Autumn here.
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Old 10-27-2016, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,383,155 times
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While Texas can still be really hot, I still prefer it so much over South Florida. I moved to Texas at age 20 so for 20 years I lived with horrid heat and humidity that rarely ended. Minneapolis is where I'd love to settle down.
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Old 10-27-2016, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,639,169 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Obviously, we're never (maybe?) going to have our perfect weather climate. But usually when moving, we often face a compromise between weather and city. You may have a job offer in a city you like, but the weather sucks. Or you often see people on here cross off cities for relocation even if they like the city, but the weather is terrible.

I actually prefer cold weather. So in my case, it should have been relatively easy to move somewhere with a cold climate...but I kept getting stuck in warm weather cities. I suppose living somewhere with warm weather is harder to attain than living in a cold climate.

I'm a Florida native (Tampa) and I can't stand heat/humidity. After that, I moved to Los Angeles. I definitely like the SoCal climate, but unless you were near the water it was just too hot for me at times. Plus it'd be hot during the day but you'd need a jacket as soon as the soon drop. Didn't get cold enough for me...I guess constant 60's/70's can get pretty boring.

I also lived in Sydney, Australia, and Raleigh, NC. Now I'm living in NYC where I finally have the weather I want! Raleigh was the closest...turns out I'm a 4 seasons kind of person. But I really like snow, and a very cold winter. Maybe one day I'll move to Minneapolis...that'd be the perfect climate for me.

What about you? I'm just a bit surprised that looking back now, it was amazing how I kept getting stuck in hot climates.
I like the dry weather of the West. Humid weather gets really hot for me very quickly. I'm very heat intolerant. I'd say high 70s and it started to feel toasty on my end in the "wet" weather of the East. With that being stated weather-wise almost the entire East isn't ideal except like, New England and Minnesota. But for other reasons those areas don't appeal to me, I like the rugged landscapes of the west.

So far my favorite city has been New Orleans. But because of above, I would hate living there. Summers in New Orleans are just... not ok. There really isn't a New Orleans equivalent any where else in the country, it just doesn't exist. Especially out West. It just doesn't compare to anything else. Loved the architecture, the friendliness of the citizens, the cuisine was some of the best I've ever had, socially progressive (albeit religious), walkability, nightlife, big city amenities (professional sports, good airport, etc.)... Weather is quite literally the only downfall to New Orleans in my book.

Weather wise I really like Flagstaff and Santa Fe. Both very high elevation (7k feet, 2k higher than Denver) cities in the dry Southwest. Summer nights are a bit cooler than I'd like but you lose somewhere. Santa Fe gets bonus points for not being as snowy and having a better Downtown area. Santa Fe and Flagstaff both however, don't have good economies, with Santa Fe being slightly better. Will I end up in either? I doubt it... It's just not realistic. And I'll miss the amenities that large cities offer. Santa Fe got pretty suburban and sleepy quickly, and so does Flagstaff. Albuquerque seems like a good halfway option but if Albuquerque is anything like Tucson (and I suspect it is they seem to be more similar than different) ABQ will also be relatively sleepy unless you're a college student. Just not ok for a young and single Millennial at this time in my life. Western cities are very isolated so you have to rely on that one city's population to support a nightlife, the smaller it is (Tucson/ABQ) and the more isolated it is (SLC/Denver) the harder that becomes.

So if I look at areas with bigger cities, there is Denver. Denver is expensive, good employment rates, seems like a great city. Denver is on the plains however and I liked how in other places in the West there are places all around to explore, whereas in Denver there's only westwards. The best places to go in Colorado seem far away from Denver and closer to say Colorado Springs and Utah. Weather-wise it seems OK, not sure how much it differs from Flagstaff and Santa Fe which I have experienced. Also somewhat hesitant to give up amazing, cheap Mexican cuisine for....? I feel that I may never afford Denver like I would want to.

Salt Lake City I thought of. But social conservative policies of Utah and the prominence of LDS (I'm an atheist and very critical of all religions) makes me strongly hesitate. Would hate to live in a state strongly influenced by a religion. It seems to get hot in the summer (which I am used to) on top of cold winters. Inversions are very concerning. Looks like a great city with good public transit and friendly people, and is still affordable. Employment also seems good. Though I worry about dating if I were to live here (as an atheist who doesn't want anything to do personally with LDS).

Then there's Portland and Seattle I have thought of. Super cloudy and rainy, I never hated the rain but I do question how that would make me feel after a long period of time (I love overcast so that part isn't being questioned). I like the greenery since it's so different than what I'm used to. Portland seems to have a unique subculture (like New Orleans) that attracts my attention more than Seattle, but they fall in the same issue with Denver, can I afford it? Will I be able to have a good life there or will I always struggle check-to-check? Oregon and Washington have the benefits of Arizona and New Mexico in that there's always a ton of places to go and explore in all directions, so these two cities strictly come down to costs and the question of precipitation, if I can tolerate that.

Boise I have heard was a great city. Lively and affordable. Weather seems decent, again comes down to winters (how does it compare to Flagstaff?). I looked into it. Idaho seems like a lovely state, arguably one of the best ones out West. Worried about social conservatism and other ultra-conservative policies... I live in a red state now and I would like to leave that behind me, arguably a purple state with no party stronghold would be the ideal state. Boise has amazing outdoor access especially to rapids (one of my favorite outdoor activities, impossible to do in Arizona except Grand Canyon which is for pros only) and forests, skiing, and northern Idaho is stunning. Comes down to sleepiness (Millennial-friendly), employment... etc.

In sum, I will never find a place with great weather that is also a great city. Even though I don't want to say this, I'll probably be stuck in Arizona for a while before I can get a job out of state. Though I do suspect one of the above cities to be the closest match... But I'm a long way out. Southern Arizona is just way too hot for too long, and I'd like more weather variation than the same old same old.
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Old 10-28-2016, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,860,994 times
Reputation: 5855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I like the dry weather of the West. Humid weather gets really hot for me very quickly. I'm very heat intolerant. I'd say high 70s and it started to feel toasty on my end in the "wet" weather of the East. With that being stated weather-wise almost the entire East isn't ideal except like, New England and Minnesota. But for other reasons those areas don't appeal to me, I like the rugged landscapes of the west.

So far my favorite city has been New Orleans. But because of above, I would hate living there. Summers in New Orleans are just... not ok. There really isn't a New Orleans equivalent any where else in the country, it just doesn't exist. Especially out West. It just doesn't compare to anything else. Loved the architecture, the friendliness of the citizens, the cuisine was some of the best I've ever had, socially progressive (albeit religious), walkability, nightlife, big city amenities (professional sports, good airport, etc.)... Weather is quite literally the only downfall to New Orleans in my book.

Weather wise I really like Flagstaff and Santa Fe. Both very high elevation (7k feet, 2k higher than Denver) cities in the dry Southwest. Summer nights are a bit cooler than I'd like but you lose somewhere. Santa Fe gets bonus points for not being as snowy and having a better Downtown area. Santa Fe and Flagstaff both however, don't have good economies, with Santa Fe being slightly better. Will I end up in either? I doubt it... It's just not realistic. And I'll miss the amenities that large cities offer. Santa Fe got pretty suburban and sleepy quickly, and so does Flagstaff. Albuquerque seems like a good halfway option but if Albuquerque is anything like Tucson (and I suspect it is they seem to be more similar than different) ABQ will also be relatively sleepy unless you're a college student. Just not ok for a young and single Millennial at this time in my life. Western cities are very isolated so you have to rely on that one city's population to support a nightlife, the smaller it is (Tucson/ABQ) and the more isolated it is (SLC/Denver) the harder that becomes.

So if I look at areas with bigger cities, there is Denver. Denver is expensive, good employment rates, seems like a great city. Denver is on the plains however and I liked how in other places in the West there are places all around to explore, whereas in Denver there's only westwards. The best places to go in Colorado seem far away from Denver and closer to say Colorado Springs and Utah. Weather-wise it seems OK, not sure how much it differs from Flagstaff and Santa Fe which I have experienced. Also somewhat hesitant to give up amazing, cheap Mexican cuisine for....? I feel that I may never afford Denver like I would want to.

Salt Lake City I thought of. But social conservative policies of Utah and the prominence of LDS (I'm an atheist and very critical of all religions) makes me strongly hesitate. Would hate to live in a state strongly influenced by a religion. It seems to get hot in the summer (which I am used to) on top of cold winters. Inversions are very concerning. Looks like a great city with good public transit and friendly people, and is still affordable. Employment also seems good. Though I worry about dating if I were to live here (as an atheist who doesn't want anything to do personally with LDS).

Then there's Portland and Seattle I have thought of. Super cloudy and rainy, I never hated the rain but I do question how that would make me feel after a long period of time (I love overcast so that part isn't being questioned). I like the greenery since it's so different than what I'm used to. Portland seems to have a unique subculture (like New Orleans) that attracts my attention more than Seattle, but they fall in the same issue with Denver, can I afford it? Will I be able to have a good life there or will I always struggle check-to-check? Oregon and Washington have the benefits of Arizona and New Mexico in that there's always a ton of places to go and explore in all directions, so these two cities strictly come down to costs and the question of precipitation, if I can tolerate that.

Boise I have heard was a great city. Lively and affordable. Weather seems decent, again comes down to winters (how does it compare to Flagstaff?). I looked into it. Idaho seems like a lovely state, arguably one of the best ones out West. Worried about social conservatism and other ultra-conservative policies... I live in a red state now and I would like to leave that behind me, arguably a purple state with no party stronghold would be the ideal state. Boise has amazing outdoor access especially to rapids (one of my favorite outdoor activities, impossible to do in Arizona except Grand Canyon which is for pros only) and forests, skiing, and northern Idaho is stunning. Comes down to sleepiness (Millennial-friendly), employment... etc.

In sum, I will never find a place with great weather that is also a great city. Even though I don't want to say this, I'll probably be stuck in Arizona for a while before I can get a job out of state. Though I do suspect one of the above cities to be the closest match... But I'm a long way out. Southern Arizona is just way too hot for too long, and I'd like more weather variation than the same old same old.
I'm guessing you don't like Los Angeles
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Old 10-28-2016, 05:02 AM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,140 posts, read 3,430,980 times
Reputation: 1819
in suburban Bay Area, climate is by far the best I've ever lived in

not humid, more rain and variety than SoCal, more summer than downtown SF, and never, ever have to look at old, crusty brown piles of plowed snow
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Old 10-28-2016, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
2,696 posts, read 987,386 times
Reputation: 1908
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Obviously, we're never (maybe?) going to have our perfect weather climate. But usually when moving, we often face a compromise between weather and city. You may have a job offer in a city you like, but the weather sucks. Or you often see people on here cross off cities for relocation even if they like the city, but the weather is terrible.

I actually prefer cold weather. So in my case, it should have been relatively easy to move somewhere with a cold climate...but I kept getting stuck in warm weather cities. I suppose living somewhere with warm weather is harder to attain than living in a cold climate.

I'm a Florida native (Tampa) and I can't stand heat/humidity. After that, I moved to Los Angeles. I definitely like the SoCal climate, but unless you were near the water it was just too hot for me at times. Plus it'd be hot during the day but you'd need a jacket as soon as the soon drop. Didn't get cold enough for me...I guess constant 60's/70's can get pretty boring.

I also lived in Sydney, Australia, and Raleigh, NC. Now I'm living in NYC where I finally have the weather I want! Raleigh was the closest...turns out I'm a 4 seasons kind of person. But I really like snow, and a very cold winter. Maybe one day I'll move to Minneapolis...that'd be the perfect climate for me.

What about you? I'm just a bit surprised that looking back now, it was amazing how I kept getting stuck in hot climates.
I find this really surprising, I think NYC weather is pretty terrible. Mainly because you don't get to enjoy the best of what each season has to offer. In the winter the streets are wet and nasty and disgusting, and in the summer the city smells like dog****. It gets pretty humid here too. Fall and spring are best, but too short. I do appreciate cold weather though for the coziness.

Were you in the valley in LA? That's where I'm from and it definitely gets a good 10 degrees hotter on avg than the rest of the city during the summer months. You're absolutely dead on re: the temperature drops in LA in the evening.

To answer your question....still haven't landed in a perfect weather city for me yet. For me, I think I would actually like the Florida beaches weather-wise because of lifestyle preferences. I like to be outside in the morning and evening, and stay inside during the mid-day hours, so the warmer humid places are actually preferable to me (as long as they're tempered by an ocean breeze). I'd also like to take up a water activity like windsurfing or paddleboarding, which warm weather is preferable for.
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Old 10-28-2016, 08:47 AM
 
473 posts, read 358,780 times
Reputation: 1030
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
in suburban Bay Area, climate is by far the best I've ever lived in

not humid, more rain and variety than SoCal, more summer than downtown SF, and never, ever have to look at old, crusty brown piles of plowed snow
Hi neighbor!

And if anyone doubts we have the best weather, it's even a town motto:

"Climate best by government test"

The government has spoken. We won.
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