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Old 10-30-2016, 11:37 AM
 
33 posts, read 21,869 times
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Thanks for the advice on the ice. That is something I did experience during a January trip to Memphis but I didn't know that was less of an issue in heavy snow states.
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Old 10-30-2016, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heatheruf View Post
Thanks for the advice on the ice. That is something I did experience during a January trip to Memphis but I didn't know that was less of an issue in heavy snow states.
Yup definitely. When I lived in Raleigh, they got snow so infrequently that ice was more of an issue. And you do not want to be driving in ice.
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Old 10-31-2016, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,849 posts, read 2,975,563 times
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Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Factually untrue.
It really is. Just like the Texans who say DC has hotter summers than theirs. Just not true.
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Old 11-02-2016, 07:16 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,948,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Florida has what amounts to about 7 months of summer while Atlanta gets at most 3 months, with less humidity generally speaking too. It's not like other big cities don't see screaming hot summers either. I lived in Philadelphia for 10 years and DC the 7 years prior where most years their July and August was as hot or hotter than what I experience here in the Orlando area.
I live near Athens, and you're wrong. Summer heat in this part of Georgia normally lasts for about four months, from mid-May through mid-September, and if you get a warmer-than-normal spring or fall, then it can easily feel like summer for five months or more. Last winter was very brief; it ended by mid-March, and it's been reliably 80F or warmer since. Our first day of 90F temperatures this year was April 29, and our last day was October 20. This is certainly above normal, but summers with long heat duration tend to happen every five years or so. It happened in 2007 and 2011 as well. Athens averages 53 days of 90F temperatures per year, and many more days in the upper 80s, which is still very summer-like. Only this weekend will we get to say goodbye to 80F temperatures for the year.
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Old 11-03-2016, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,194 posts, read 10,409,482 times
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Just do it. Dress in layers and learn to take an extra 10-15 minutes on snow days to scrape off your car. I moved from California to Ohio, and people from the Caribbean and Mexico move to the Northeast and Midwest all the time. I kind of like the "man vs world" nature of winter, and it makes you really appreciate spring when it comes around.
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Old 11-03-2016, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,718 posts, read 3,570,956 times
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Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Just do it. Dress in layers and learn to take an extra 10-15 minutes on snow days to scrape off your car. I moved from California to Ohio, and people from the Caribbean and Mexico move to the Northeast and Midwest all the time. I kind of like the "man vs world" nature of winter, and it makes you really appreciate spring when it comes around.
Great advice. I feel the same way about winter. It's actually my favorite season.
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Old 11-03-2016, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I moved from northeast TN to IN and IA.

The big thing wasn't the snow - we do get snow in NC/TN and above. It was so cloudy and overcast in IN, for months. We do seem to get a little more sun in TN. In IA, it's colder, but sunnier and windier than TN.

Really outside of central TX/coastal regions, winter in most of the country just sucks. Basically write off November-March for outdoor stuff.
I'll remember that when I'm hiking or snowshoeing in the middle of January on a bluebird Colorado day.

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Old 11-04-2016, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,509 posts, read 7,454,824 times
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The answer to this question depends on where "up north" means for a northward bound Floridian. If it is Georgia, North Carolina or Tennessee then the transition will be fine. We have tons of Florida transplants in Tennessee and most of them love our easy climate. The one or two days it snows they seem to enjoy it. Most winter days here the high is 45 or 50 degrees, sometimes warmer. Upper South winters are quite tame, we have a mfour seasons climate but it's very lopsided toward the warm side.
If the OP really moves north..... to the "real" north the we are talking a true shock. The cold in Minnesota or the deep snows of Michigan for example would be something a Floridian would have to learn to live with. The cold time of year last from November to April up there, sometimes longer. For seven months it can snow and nothing is green. People up there have learned to enjoy winter with activities like skiing, snowmobiles, ice fishing etc. The key to enjoying northern living is enjoying cold weather activivity. ( I have lived in the north before so my opinion is based in experience)
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Old 11-05-2016, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,779 posts, read 9,411,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
I'll remember that when I'm hiking or snowshoeing in the middle of January on a bluebird Colorado day.
Try that in a blizzard

Colorado is kind of an exception in the sense that the Chinook winds can blow and get Denver up to 70 in the winter. Then two days later it can be -15.

So you're not telling the full story.
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Old 11-05-2016, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,980 posts, read 23,882,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Try that in a blizzard

Colorado is kind of an exception in the sense that the Chinook winds can blow and get Denver up to 70 in the winter. Then two days later it can be -15.

So you're not telling the full story.
I never minded living in areas where the snow melted in a day or two. It is different when you have to live with storm after storm and don't know where to put the new snow because the mounds are already so high you can't reach high enough to put more on top.
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