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Old 08-17-2010, 10:45 AM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,322,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Well storms like that happen in our country once every 2-3 years. I believe the stats are that if you stood in one particular spot in tornado alley and waited, you would be struck by a tornado on average once every 10,000 years - and even then 85% of tornadoes that hit are F0 or F1, which normally just cause broken glass, tree damage and possible roof issues.
Like i said, the chance of tornado directly hitting you are low
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Old 08-17-2010, 10:52 AM
 
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I lived 20+ years in Southern California, then the last 12 in South Florida, so I am well acquainted with both earthquakes and hurricanes. Worst earthquake was the Northridge on 1/17/94, while the worst hurricane was Wilma, 10/24/05. Of the two, I will join the consensus and say I prefer a hurricane, because it is predicted, you can prepare, and if necessary, run away from it (though I haven't had to yet). Earthquakes, OTOH, strike without warning, often chickens#!t in the middle of the night (like Northridge). So you have to end up carrying a bunch of crap in your car to be prepared b/c you never know.

As far as tornados, I lived in Illinois for 3 years, never experienced one, the one time I was close to one was in L. A.! Spring of 1983, a tornado hit near downtown (messed up the Convention Center, for months afterward, the sign read "ENTION CENTER", the "conv" letters were ripped right off. Tornado then went into South Central L A and damaged a bunch of homes. I was on my way to work on a bus and musta literally missed it by minutes, got to one intersection and the traffic lights were all mangled and there was crap strewn about the street, bus had to detour. Never thought that would happen. Then got to work and the power was out all morning, had to sit there in semi-darkness.
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Old 08-17-2010, 11:05 AM
 
Location: NC
2,303 posts, read 5,170,558 times
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I would have to vote for a hurricane. I live far enough inland that the probability of a hurricane maintaining hurricane force winds is very low--in fact, only one (Hugo) has made it to my neck of the woods in my entire lifetime of nearly 30 years. We usually only deal with tropical depressions. Even if I lived near the beach, I'd still go for a hurricane. You have days to get out of town. Tornadoes are unpredictable, and so are earthquakes.
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Old 08-22-2010, 10:05 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,113,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dogwalker425 View Post
I don't know about you, but I can "feel" when it's tornado weather. You go outside in the morning and it's bright and sunny with blue skies, but it just feels off. Might not make sense to anyone else and I can't really explain it, but there it is. LOL
This is absolutely true! I can't quite explain it either, but like you say, there is just a certain "feel" to the air that is "off." I am a school teacher and have to get up fairly early to go to work. I usually leave the house about 7 a.m. and on certain spring morning, I can usually sorta detect if it is going to be a "bad weather" day. Breezy S to SE winds, already warm and humid...things like that.

Just on a related tangent, carrying this a step further, what is really interesting (to me at least, as I am a severe weather junkie! LOL)) is the "feel" of the air when a tornado is either approaching or forming and in the immediate vicinity. It gets absolutely "dead calm" right beforehand. The air is so still it is eerie. Birds stop singing, and dogs stop barking. In fact, animals usually try and hide somewhere, as they detect something is wrong.

In fact, so do many people feel a sense of dread...even though they may not be able to articulate it. I read a facinating article sometime back explaining this phenomenon. That is, how those who have survived tornadoes later said they just had a "feeling" something is radically wrong. As the article said, there is actually a biological reason for it. To wit, barometric pressure falls rapidly in a tornadic situation. And one of the things human beings share still share with animals is a physiological reaction to a sharp drop in air pressue. They (we) instinctively become a bit agitated and fearful, not necessarily knowing exactly why.

It is related to, as mentioned above, why birds stop chirping and cats and dogs first run in circles or act strangely, then hide under beds or under the house (or whereever). It is a natural defence mechanism, and it is theorized that humans still share it on a certain evolutionary level. Which makes sense. After all, radar and radio and TV were not always around to issue weather reports, so it may be something that God and/or nature instilled in animals (including human beings) as a natural "early warning" system.

Ok..is it noon yet? After that rambling post, I think a beer will taste good!
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Old 08-22-2010, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Arlington, VA and Washington, DC
23,638 posts, read 33,429,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevb87 View Post
Which would you rather deal with, and why?
Best to worst.

1. Hurricane. Plenty of warning to get the h&@# out of dodge.
2. Tornado. Just enough time to duck and cover.
3. Earthquake. No warning and I highly doubt anywhere East of the Mississippi River has had buildings built to withstand earthquakes.
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Old 08-22-2010, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
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I will take the hurricanes, spank you very much. You have days to get out of the way, while earthquakes and tornadoes sneak up on you
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Old 08-22-2010, 01:02 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,113,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alanboy395 View Post
Best to worst.

1. Hurricane. Plenty of warning to get the h&@# out of dodge.
2. Tornado. Just enough time to duck and cover.
3. Earthquake. No warning and I highly doubt anywhere East of the Mississippi River has had buildings built to withstand earthquakes.
This reminds me of a funny interview I once heard on a news channel. You are correct, of course about having lots of advance warning and time to get the hell out of there, but you might get a chuckle out of this one.

I think it was back during the 80's when a hurricane warning had been issued for the SE Texas coast...especially Galveston Island. Anyway, it was still a couple of days away, so the news media were interviewing locals in Galveston about their possible plans to evacute, as this was forecasted as a major hurricane.

Anyway, there appears some local screwball who says along the lines of "This island has always been good to us, so me and my family are going to stay right here and stick by her."

Oh lord. LMAO. While I can appreciate the sentiment and sense of loyalty, did this nut really think he was helping "the island" by possibly getting his family killed in the process? Was the seawall going to say "Hey, Joe, sure do appreciate you remaining here. No telling what would have happened to me if it hadn't been for people like you staying behind to support me."
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Old 08-22-2010, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,167,283 times
Reputation: 7598
lol. peopel say that all the time when Hurricanes are approaching.

The only reason people evacuated for Rita was the memories of Katrina.

I didn't want to leave for Rita (not because Houston was good to me ) I just didn't see the point. Heck the leaves on the trees near my house were not even ruffled.
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Old 08-22-2010, 03:21 PM
 
Location: St Paul, MN - NJ's Gold Coast
5,256 posts, read 11,961,450 times
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Hurricane.
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Old 08-22-2010, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,238,355 times
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So far it hasn't been much of a hurricane season and I hope things stay that way but it is still very early and the hurricane season is still at least 2-3 months long.

Tornadoes still occur this late in summer [generally in the upper Midwest] but the worst tornadoes happen in the Spring and generally in "Tornado Alley" [Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkansas].

Seismologists recently issued a sobering report that stress on the San Andreas fault is seriously building. Also California is overdue for a major earthquake. Uh Oh
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