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Old 08-22-2010, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,792,100 times
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I've seen Houston's plans for Hurricanes and its a 10 year construction plan that will change the city up so much. Basically with brand new technological advancements the city is making a 10 year effort to construct such a barrier that would not allow the hurricane to even touch ground in Metro Houston with any storm surges or anything and it would reduces and cut their wind speed greatly.

Also this barrier will pave the way to making hurricane season one of Houston's most powerful assets, as many know they are building a massive wind farm on Pelican Island (a small island in Metro Houston) and these barriers will keep Hurricanes mostly out of doing harm and it will benefit the wind farms in Pelican Island in terms of high winds. It will be a new economic driving force for Houston in the future.

The 10 year project period for the barrier as they proposed for it starts in 2012, and by 2020 it will be functional.

And anyways, Hurricanes aren't really a problem for Houston much. Only two Hurricanes in recent times that I've had to worry about, Rita & Ike. Both of which I went to Dallas, where my dad had a place because he used to work there during the week. Rita didn't do anything at all, and Ike left some damage but nothing serious at all.
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Old 08-22-2010, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,233,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Awesome Danny View Post
I've seen Houston's plans for Hurricanes and its a 10 year construction plan that will change the city up so much. Basically with brand new technological advancements the city is making a 10 year effort to construct such a barrier that would not allow the hurricane to even touch ground in Metro Houston with any storm surges or anything and it would reduces and cut their wind speed greatly.

Also this barrier will pave the way to making hurricane season one of Houston's most powerful assets, as many know they are building a massive wind farm on Pelican Island (a small island in Metro Houston) and these barriers will keep Hurricanes mostly out of doing harm and it will benefit the wind farms in Pelican Island in terms of high winds. It will be a new economic driving force for Houston in the future.

The 10 year project period for the barrier as they proposed for it starts in 2012, and by 2020 it will be functional.

And anyways, Hurricanes aren't really a problem for Houston much. Only two Hurricanes in recent times that I've had to worry about, Rita & Ike. Both of which I went to Dallas, where my dad had a place because he used to work there during the week. Rita didn't do anything at all, and Ike left some damage but nothing serious at all.
Danny, do you know if Galveston has fully recovered from the hurricane they experienced a few years ago?
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Old 08-22-2010, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
Danny, do you know if Galveston has fully recovered from the hurricane they experienced a few years ago?
Not fully. Supposedly 70% of the homes there had roof damage. But they are under way and being restored. There have been numerous revitalization projects that are under way. And many brand new projects too with infrastructure to resist damage that most of the early 1900's and mid 1900's homes and buildings suffered by Ike.

One of the most impressive projects that's being constructed and half complete is Beachtown. And plenty more lined up to happen to change Galveston for the best.
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Old 08-22-2010, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
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Originally Posted by Awesome Danny View Post
Not fully. Supposedly 70% of the homes there had roof damage. But they are under way and being restored. There have been numerous revitalization projects that are under way. And many brand new projects too with infrastructure to resist damage that most of the early 1900's and mid 1900's homes and buildings suffered by Ike.

One of the most impressive projects that's being constructed and half complete is Beachtown. And plenty more lined up to happen to change Galveston for the best.
How do the home owners and businesses get insurance? If a city is in a high risk area some insurance companies won't even provide coverage. Here in California earthquake insurance is so expensive that many people don't have it.
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Old 08-22-2010, 04:42 PM
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Location: Ohio
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Tornado. The dollar amount of damage that a single tornado can do is miniscule compared to what a powerful hurricane or earthquake could do. Think thousands of dollars versus billions. Media coverage makes tornado damage look dramatic, because it is dramatic, but it's in a very small area. Hurricanes and earthquakes can damage hundreds of square miles at a time.

As far as the advanced warning goes, the National Weather Service and the Storm Prediction Center have gotten very good at predicting regions of the country where tornadoes are possible 1-2 days ahead of time. NEXRAD doppler radar is excellent at detecting them and with a weather alert radio, you get notified in your home within a couple of minutes of when a tornado is detected on radar in your county. There is nothing even close to that kind of precise prediction or even advance warning for earthquakes.
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Old 08-22-2010, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,792,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
How do the home owners and businesses get insurance? If a city is in a high risk area some insurance companies won't even provide coverage. Here in California earthquake insurance is so expensive that many people don't have it.
I asked my parents about it, it generally is covered with "home insurance" in Metro Houston. Or did you mean to specifically ask about Galveston Island instead of the whole Metro Houston area?

My mother just told me it comes in variation and its tricky, like for flooding there are insurance options that cover it but it falls into a branch of how much it floods or what side of the city it comes from and things of that nature. It generally gets tricky.

Most of Houston area is fine, and it experiences small to little damage in general when a major hurricane comes, but Galveston Island gets battered during major hurricanes, simply due the fact that their infrastructure is old and outdated to handle the storms. They have started rebuilding much of the island, they are even planning on looking into the silt problem and purifying that water as much as possible. Fun fact, did you know that on average 40 days out of 365 days in a year Galveston beaches have nice blue water? Many just think of it as dark and murky water in general. Its not even pollution but rather it is silt, and they are addressing that problem this decade as well.

As for insurance on Galveston Island in particular I am not exactly sure on their rates but my mother said if they have an extensive plan there it would be quite costly. For the rest of Metro Houston it varies on what part of the city you live in, I am in Sugar Land (southwest side) and insurance rates are decent nothing too bad, but not great either.

This new decade in general is a very important one for Metro Houston especially given Panamax Post 2014, it will change the Metro areas face. Going out on a limb but from everything I've read and seen, and I mean everything about Houston's planning on infrastructure and economy this might as well be the most important decade in its existence. A lot of projects going up and planned to reduce economical and natural risks.
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Old 08-22-2010, 05:38 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,131,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
How do the home owners and businesses get insurance? If a city is in a high risk area some insurance companies won't even provide coverage. Here in California earthquake insurance is so expensive that many people don't have it.
I don't know about Texas specifically, but along the Gulf Coast since Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike 8 out of 10 people can't get insurance. Most major companies have since refused to write any policies in areas with hurricane risk. The state of Louisiana had to start issuing state backed insurance to citizens similarly to Florida.
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Old 08-22-2010, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
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I'm not surprised that most people in hurricane regions either don't have hurricane insurance or pay huge premiums for coverage. After devastating hurricanes like Katrina and Ike some insurance companies probably nearly went bankrupt. So people have to take their chances and if they are wiped out maybe the government will provide low interest loans. In California many insurance companies don't even offer earthquake coverage anymore because they don't think it is a wise investment. And the deductible is so high that people have to pay huge amounts before the insurance company will begin to pick up costs.
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Old 08-22-2010, 07:46 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,131,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
I'm not surprised that most people in hurricane regions either don't have hurricane insurance or pay huge premiums for coverage. After devastating hurricanes like Katrina and Ike some insurance companies probably nearly went bankrupt. So people have to take their chances and if they are wiped out maybe the government will provide low interest loans. In California many insurance companies don't even offer earthquake coverage anymore because they don't think it is a wise investment. And the deductible is so high that people have to pay huge amounts before the insurance company will begin to pick up costs.
Most of the major companies never payed most of the settlements to begin with. After Katrina they began to stretch every single loop hole possible. There are thousands of lawsuits still pending and 5 years later many people have yet to receive a dime. Here landlords pass on the deductibles to renters so it's nothing to find a 500 sq ft apartment rent for $1200 in the worst of the worst neighborhoods. Houston isn't affected by this since it's far enough inland to not be a total loss, but just imagine how it would be if 5,000,000 homes were at risk of being wiped out every summer. It will be interesting to see how Galveston rebounds from Ike in the long run. I wouldn't be surprised if there is a massive price out.
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Old 08-22-2010, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,233,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Most of the major companies never payed most of the settlements to begin with. After Katrina they began to stretch every single loop hole possible. There are thousands of lawsuits still pending and 5 years later many people have yet to receive a dime. Here landlords pass on the deductibles to renters so it's nothing to find a 500 sq ft apartment rent for $1200 in the worst of the worst neighborhoods. Houston isn't affected by this since it's far enough inland to not be a total loss, but just imagine how it would be if 5,000,000 homes were at risk of being wiped out every summer. It will be interesting to see how Galveston rebounds from Ike in the long run. I wouldn't be surprised if there is a massive price out.
Sadly, I am not surprised to read your post. I heard that insurance companies argued over what was wind damage versus what was water damage because it was a way to weasel out of not paying. Damn, rents in New Orleans are higher than Los Angeles.
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