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Old 08-23-2010, 07:05 AM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,482,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
This is absolutely true! I can't quite explain it either, but like you say, there is just a certain "feel" to the air that is "off." I am a school teacher and have to get up fairly early to go to work. I usually leave the house about 7 a.m. and on certain spring morning, I can usually sorta detect if it is going to be a "bad weather" day. Breezy S to SE winds, already warm and humid...things like that.

Just on a related tangent, carrying this a step further, what is really interesting (to me at least, as I am a severe weather junkie! LOL)) is the "feel" of the air when a tornado is either approaching or forming and in the immediate vicinity. It gets absolutely "dead calm" right beforehand. The air is so still it is eerie. Birds stop singing, and dogs stop barking. In fact, animals usually try and hide somewhere, as they detect something is wrong.

In fact, so do many people feel a sense of dread...even though they may not be able to articulate it. I read a facinating article sometime back explaining this phenomenon. That is, how those who have survived tornadoes later said they just had a "feeling" something is radically wrong. As the article said, there is actually a biological reason for it. To wit, barometric pressure falls rapidly in a tornadic situation. And one of the things human beings share still share with animals is a physiological reaction to a sharp drop in air pressue. They (we) instinctively become a bit agitated and fearful, not necessarily knowing exactly why.

It is related to, as mentioned above, why birds stop chirping and cats and dogs first run in circles or act strangely, then hide under beds or under the house (or whereever). It is a natural defence mechanism, and it is theorized that humans still share it on a certain evolutionary level. Which makes sense. After all, radar and radio and TV were not always around to issue weather reports, so it may be something that God and/or nature instilled in animals (including human beings) as a natural "early warning" system.

Ok..is it noon yet? After that rambling post, I think a beer will taste good!
That's interesting. I'm a bit of a severe weather junkie too, but I've never actually been that close to a tornado (never even seen one). I love the calmness and the green skies. I've gotten screwed the last couple years. LOL
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Old 08-24-2010, 05:27 PM
 
11,204 posts, read 22,490,741 times
Reputation: 10967
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
This is absolutely true! I can't quite explain it either, but like you say, there is just a certain "feel" to the air that is "off." I am a school teacher and have to get up fairly early to go to work. I usually leave the house about 7 a.m. and on certain spring morning, I can usually sorta detect if it is going to be a "bad weather" day. Breezy S to SE winds, already warm and humid...things like that.

Just on a related tangent, carrying this a step further, what is really interesting (to me at least, as I am a severe weather junkie! LOL)) is the "feel" of the air when a tornado is either approaching or forming and in the immediate vicinity. It gets absolutely "dead calm" right beforehand. The air is so still it is eerie. Birds stop singing, and dogs stop barking. In fact, animals usually try and hide somewhere, as they detect something is wrong.

In fact, so do many people feel a sense of dread...even though they may not be able to articulate it. I read a facinating article sometime back explaining this phenomenon. That is, how those who have survived tornadoes later said they just had a "feeling" something is radically wrong. As the article said, there is actually a biological reason for it. To wit, barometric pressure falls rapidly in a tornadic situation. And one of the things human beings share still share with animals is a physiological reaction to a sharp drop in air pressue. They (we) instinctively become a bit agitated and fearful, not necessarily knowing exactly why.


It is related to, as mentioned above, why birds stop chirping and cats and dogs first run in circles or act strangely, then hide under beds or under the house (or whereever). It is a natural defence mechanism, and it is theorized that humans still share it on a certain evolutionary level. Which makes sense. After all, radar and radio and TV were not always around to issue weather reports, so it may be something that God and/or nature instilled in animals (including human beings) as a natural "early warning" system.

Ok..is it noon yet? After that rambling post, I think a beer will taste good!
That's so weird you wrote that - because it's so true, but I never really hear it discussed, just said in passing after a huge storm.

I think it's something with the air pressure and stillness in the air. You can't even describe it, it's just that weird "oh my god - something is seriously wrong" feeling you get right before a tornado/huge storm. Birds all fly away and the animals scram as well.

I've never really been surprised by a huge storm though. Normally you'll hear a day before that big storms will hit, and then the second they fire up you can watch them for hours at times as they draw closer.

I wouldn't agree with the statement people have said about them dropping down from the air and totally taking you by surprise. People die because they just didn't have a basement to take cover in, were caught outside or weren't paying enough attention to the warnings.
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Old 08-24-2010, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,810,570 times
Reputation: 7282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
That's so weird you wrote that - because it's so true, but I never really hear it discussed, just said in passing after a huge storm.

I think it's something with the air pressure and stillness in the air. You can't even describe it, it's just that weird "oh my god - something is seriously wrong" feeling you get right before a tornado/huge storm. Birds all fly away and the animals scram as well.

I've never really been surprised by a huge storm though. Normally you'll hear a day before that big storms will hit, and then the second they fire up you can watch them for hours at times as they draw closer.

I wouldn't agree with the statement people have said about them dropping down from the air and totally taking you by surprise. People die because they just didn't have a basement to take cover in, were caught outside or weren't paying enough attention to the warnings.
I love the feeling before a tornado comes; it's exciting!

Me and my friends use to go up to my roof and look out for funnel clouds. I love the reference you made to Color Purple with the "Twista weather" because my grandpa still says that stuff.

I don't get that dropping down from the sky and taking you crap; these people obviously have never experienced a tornado because you have plenty of time to prepare yourself for one. Usually you have the tornado watching, than the warning. You'll have the news covering it every second. There is no need to feel like your unprepared for one.
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