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Old 11-03-2016, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania USA
401 posts, read 273,104 times
Reputation: 379

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qworldorder- that is so awesome! 1st photo is PHL 2nd NYC? It is surprising that the terrain is that flat / nothing blocks the view. It is surprising Trenton NJ being a separate urban area. Of course, Wilmington has a name for itself (sorry if my post sounded rude), perhaps it is just more integrated with Philadelphia than Trenton is. I prefer urban area over metropolitan area based on arbitrary county lines.

Last edited by g500; 11-03-2016 at 09:25 AM..
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,754 posts, read 3,859,615 times
Reputation: 3568
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calisonn View Post
False, the LA/Riverside UA and the SF/SJ are the 2 most well connected, the NYC/Phil is a distant 3rd.
Why would you say "false" when I am literally paraphrasing the official Census Bereau ruling on this matter? I know you may have not known it, but we had a discussion on this forum before you even joined the site, when the census results were coming in and there were rule changes between 2000 and 2010 UA criteria.

Here, I highlighted the relevant parts:

Quote:
Splitting Large Urban Agglomerations

Similar to the delineation process used for the 2000 Census, the Census Bureau will use the same automated urban area delineation methodology for determining urban and rural areas in the 2010 Census. Use of this approach will result in some exceptionally large urban agglomerations of continuously developed territory. Although such areas do reflect the reality of urbanization at one scale, the areas may be cumbersome and less satisfactory for more localized applications. For example, an area of virtually continuous urbanization exists from northeastern Maryland through the Philadelphia area, central New Jersey, the New York City area, and central Connecticut to beyond Springfield, MA. This area of near-continuous urbanization encompasses nine UAs defined for Census 2000. Another area of continuous urbanization exists in the San Francisco Bay area, including the San Francisco-Oakland, San Jose, and several smaller areas.

The Census Bureau anticipates that many data users would find these large agglomerations to be inconvenient for meaningful analysis, and therefore, proposes that they be split in some consistent fashion.
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,512 posts, read 2,978,326 times
Reputation: 2742
Quote:
Originally Posted by g500 View Post
qworldorder- that is so awesome! 1st photo is PHL 2nd NYC? It is surprising that the terrain is that flat / nothing blocks the view. It is surprising Trenton NJ being a separate urban area. Of course, Wilmington has a name for itself (sorry if my post sounded rude), perhaps it is just more integrated with Philadelphia than Trenton is. I prefer urban area over metropolitan area based on arbitrary county lines.
No worries. Yea, that's what the 1st and 2nd photos look like to me. And I don't think Trenton is any less integrated with Philadelphia than Wilmington is. It's just that it is also integrated with NYC (lesser imo), so there's that dynamic.

And are you sure Trenton is its own separate urban area? I can't seem to confirm that it isn't technically a part of either Philadelphia's or New York's urban areas.
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:54 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,257,760 times
Reputation: 1826
Quote:
Originally Posted by g500 View Post
Parhe - There are online estimates of urban area population as of 2015, and predictions going forward every 5 years. As of 2015 Dallas is shown at 5th place (MIA still 4th). In 2020, Dallas is estimated to pass MIA, but then Houston jumps two spots, so Dallas would still be 5th. Keep in mind that these three UA's are very similar in size to each other. Did not know Denton-Lewisville is separate, which is odd?
Well, I did mention it in my post :P Still not sure how UAs work, as I have never looked into them before those thread, so I don't know why the three are counted separately, but, hey, the people who make these distinctions know more than me.

Also, I am surprised by Houston's growth. Didn't know it would surpass DFW in UA.
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Old 11-03-2016, 10:42 AM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,432,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
And are you sure Trenton is its own separate urban area? I can't seem to confirm that it isn't technically a part of either Philadelphia's or New York's urban areas.
#128: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...es_urban_areas
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Old 11-03-2016, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,652,932 times
Reputation: 3625
Phoenix and Avondale really?? Avondale is a suburb of Phoenix...

I see this with Mesa too. People will say something like, "Mesa is about to be #2 largest city in Arizona, surpassing Tucson." But Mesa is only as big as it is because it's attached to Phoenix. To act like Mesa, or Avondale in this case, are separate cities is laughable at best. Most people in Mesa commute into the other Phoenix suburbs or Phoenix proper itself.

Now, Phoenix is most likely to combine with the Casa Grande area but the only way it can do that is to wrap around the reservation out east towards Florence and back around, which will take some time, though development out there is already happening. By 2020 it won't happen, more like 2030 most likely.
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Old 11-03-2016, 05:25 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,241,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
I never knew that Dallas and McKinney were counted as different Urban Areas. Same with Denton and Lewisville.
I know DFW is divided between the Fort Worth-Arlington division and the Dallas-Irving-Plano division. McKinney and Denton are county seats, same as Dallas and Fort Worth. Maybe they count the county seats as a different urban area? Lewisville isn't a county seat, though.
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Old 11-03-2016, 06:22 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,257,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
I know DFW is divided between the Fort Worth-Arlington division and the Dallas-Irving-Plano division. McKinney and Denton are county seats, same as Dallas and Fort Worth. Maybe they count the county seats as a different urban area? Lewisville isn't a county seat, though.
Dallas and Fort Worth is, interestingly, counted as on for UAs, but you may be correct. Also, I apologize for being unclear. The specific UA was called, on Wikipedia at least, Denton-Lewisville, but then I wonder where they draw the line. Obviously, or I would hope, Carrollton (of which a large portion is in Denton County) is included in DFW's UA, seeing as it directly borders Dallas, but, then, the sprawl continues right through from Carrollton to Lewisville. They are much more well connected than places like the Bay Area.
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Old 11-03-2016, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,516,474 times
Reputation: 2935
Does anyone know why New Haven and Bridgeport-Stanford are considered separate urban areas? It's completely developed and built-up between the two.
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