U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-26-2008, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,203 posts, read 67,344,690 times
Reputation: 15849

Advertisements

Do not mention Scranton? Are you trying to give me a stroke!

All kidding aside, I think it is important to promote other medium-sized Rust Belt cities that used to be American industrial power houses but have now fallen off the face of the earth in terms of popularity.

Pittsburgh, PA has to be one of the nation's most chronically "forgotten" cities. With a population of 300,000 in a metropolitan area of around 2.5 million, the region is only a fraction of its former size, but it still packs quite a cultural punch. The population loss in Pittsburgh might actually be viewed as a mixed blessing because professional sporting events, freeways, parades, concerts, etc. are all less crowded and congested than they are in other cities. I'd love to post a few images of the Pittsburgh skyline to help "wow" you all, but I was given an infraction the last time I did so.

Youngstown, OH is practically the high-crime sister city of Scranton. The populations are similar. Both cities have a higher percentage of "whiners" than "boosters." Both cities also have some beautiful historic neighborhoods, nice shade trees, and families who have had homesteads firmly entrenched and established for generations. I think Youngstown's strategic position between Pittsburgh and Cleveland will benefit its impending revival in the same sense that Scranton's proximity to New York City and Philadelphia has begun to benefit it.

Binghamton, NY is a city that has an image that trails what I saw when I visited as a first-time tourist last year to do a comprehensive photo tour of the city, which is also the home of late Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling. I saw a downtown replete with historic brick buildings that, while largely vacant, could VERY easily be renovated into wonderful showplaces to house niche boutiques, sidewalks cafes, etc. to cater to the downtown's rebirth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-26-2008, 06:07 PM
 
7,278 posts, read 13,527,643 times
Reputation: 3610
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Chicago is the city of broad shoulders
- it is where the first steel skyscraper was built (1885), has usually been home to tallest building in US
- currently building the Western Hemisphere's first 2000 feet tall building
- population of city proper grew from 29,000 in 1850 to 3.6 million in 1950
- the Labor Day holiday was formed to honor the 7 people executed for helping workers unionize in Chicago's Forest Park
See? People helping people. I do really like Louisville. Approaching from the north, with the city spread along the river, it really is a sight to see. I pass through there a few times a year, and have stopped a few times to spend some time in the town. A very cool town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2008, 07:11 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33064
Omaha, Nebraska-

A thriving arts scene, lots of high tech businesses, a great zoo, some beautiful parks. Hilly and tree-filled.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2008, 08:50 PM
 
95 posts, read 261,595 times
Reputation: 29
NYC(and area)-most fortune 500 companies and wealthiest city
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2008, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,994,029 times
Reputation: 2364
Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
I actually think Dallas is bigger than Houston...I just think metros are more accurate than arbitrary city propers.
What is the boundary between Philadelphia MSA and the New York City MSA in Central Jersey? Kinda arbitrary if you ask me. Second of all why should cop-out suburbanites count? The only time MSAs matter is when we are making markets based on radio propagation.

Now off to the original question: Los Angeles. Vibrant, exciting, huge, diverse, and unique for a city and state surrounded by the Wild Wild West. Famous for it's entertainment industry and less known as an important place for the auto, aerospace, and oil industries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2008, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,211,511 times
Reputation: 2641
miami - south beach, north beach, miami proper, key biscayne. latin flavor. tropical. can't get a bad mojito if you tried. only 2+ hrs away by plane. great beaches. and the skyline is as good as any i've seen outside of nyc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2008, 10:34 AM
 
7,278 posts, read 13,527,643 times
Reputation: 3610
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
What is the boundary between Philadelphia MSA and the New York City MSA in Central Jersey? Kinda arbitrary if you ask me. Second of all why should cop-out suburbanites count? The only time MSAs matter is when we are making markets based on radio propagation.
BosWash - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2008, 02:00 PM
 
7,278 posts, read 13,527,643 times
Reputation: 3610
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillyhomelessguy View Post
Pittsburgh's region is not just a fraction of it's normal size. Yes the city population itself did lose population, but the region has lost some, but it isn't a fraction.
Well, technically even 99/100 is a fraction....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2008, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
2,554 posts, read 5,997,202 times
Reputation: 619
Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

This city has a great lakefront. It is home to some large fortune 500 companies, it has so much history and culture, and the canals that run through the downtown, the restaurants that sit on the canals, its one great city. It gets overlooked a lot because of its big neighbor to the south. Chicago gets all the attention.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2008, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,180 posts, read 13,051,573 times
Reputation: 1609
I live in Baltimore but will throw a shout out to Milwaukee:
1. The beautiful parkland all along the lakefront is unreal. It is great for biking, hiking, swimming, people watching and I even skied down there in the winter.
2. The downtown area is quiet but has many beautiful older buildings that give the city an air of dignity.
3. The great food all over along with a bar on every corner.
4. Biking can be accomplished all along the shore. I biked to Racine toward the south and Port Washington toward the north.
5. Cooler weather right along the lakefront in the summertime.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top