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Old 11-16-2016, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
Graffiti is like plaque on teeth(any deterioration is magnified greatly; makes buildings/neighborhoods look dirty and neglected). Housing style is a convenience factor for the graffiti artists(especially in inner city environments). More wall area (as in row houses) equals more opportunities for graffiti. Now, most houses in the south are ranch style with front yards. Not enough surface areas to write on.
By definition, rowhouses have less usuable surface area, since they don't have exterior walls on either side, and the rear is tucked away in back.

Regardless, I've been living in a city with neighborhoods full of rowhouses for 12 years now. Even in the bad neighborhoods, people don't tag rowhouses.
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Old 11-16-2016, 08:51 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,630,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Graffiti artists typically don't write on homes, rather commercial buildings like warehouses or on infrastructure such as bridges and overpasses...
They do.. on the side. When I lived in NYC they used to write on the side of row houses, also on the top where a shorter residential building was connecting to a taller one.

http://c8.alamy.com/comp/BJN533/graf...ity-BJN533.jpg

These kinda qualify as row houses too. They exist in most cities up north.
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Old 11-16-2016, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
They do.. on the side. When I lived in NYC they used to write on the side of row houses, also on the top where a shorter residential building was connecting to a taller one.

http://c8.alamy.com/comp/BJN533/graf...ity-BJN533.jpg

These kinda qualify as row houses too. They exist in most cities up north.
It's hard to tell given it's a rooftop shot, but those look to be Victorian-era commercial buildings with apartments above, not rowhouses.
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Old 11-16-2016, 12:18 PM
 
Location: A van down by the river
163 posts, read 88,025 times
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Sometimes blight and abandonment does not even go hand in hand with crime and an area being "bad". 90% of Compton is nice ranch style houses that are well kept. Montbello, Denver and sobrante park, Oakland and hidden valley, Charlotte are some areas that come to mind that are very well kept and nice suburban looking areas with lots of gang activity and very violent crime rates. These areas are known to be the ghetto not because how they look but how they actually are.
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Old 11-16-2016, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
5,616 posts, read 3,934,565 times
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Im in the Phoenix area, and as others have said, its not that bad... yet. It will be as it ages. Seeing that Phoenix already is one of the most poverty-stricken large cities, I only foresee it getting worse.
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Old 11-16-2016, 01:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It's hard to tell given it's a rooftop shot, but those look to be Victorian-era commercial buildings with apartments above, not rowhouses.
Apartment buildings are not considered residential? Are they interconnected?

http://www.yoyouheardradio.com/wp-co...a0e81b6a_b.jpg

Playing with semantics as usual.. btw, I've seen row houses with graffiti on the sides...
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Old 11-16-2016, 06:15 PM
 
153 posts, read 107,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
The reason cities like Phoenix, Las Vegas or Tampa are lacking really run-down areas is because they're quite simply not old enough yet to the cities you're comparing with that were built out 100 years or so ago versus 50 years ago. Give it another 30-40 years and one will see the deterioration you're referring to in the Sunbelt cities also. It's the American way....build, use, dispose of or allow to fall into disrepair, build new and repeat.
Sometimes it isn't just age? But construction materials used and quality of it. Also if most of its life it was well token care of. Before it became a area with some declines?

In using Chicago as a example:
It has great construction of its old stock housing to even its 50s early mid-century neighborhoods. All mostly brick or combination stone fronts and brick the rest. It has a BUNGLOW-BELT that is 1/3 of the city built 1910 - 1940. Its incredible how well this BRICK CRAFTSMEN BUNGLOW 2-story homes held up. Never needed exteriors changed.

Chicago bungalow*·*Buildings of Chicago*·*Chicago Architecture Foundation - CAF
Their origin story.
Around 1910, an enterprising architect adapted the traditional square wooden bungalow to accommodate Chicago’s standard 125-by-25 lot and its challenging weather. They had front lawns and full alleyways in back where garages later could be built. Also the Power-lines ran through the Alleys not the fronts. That started a trend that would dominate the next three decades of home building in the city. By the time the Great Depression hit, some 80,000 Chicago Bungalows stood.

Examples.

1920s built neighborhood.
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9376...g!2e0!7i13312!

Its back alleyway
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9385...7i13312!8i6656

Picture example. 1920 1930s homes hold up well.






1950's mid-century though newer hold up well.

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Old 11-16-2016, 08:12 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Some New England cities might qualify. Worcester has some poor, somewhat rundown areas but not to stereotypical ghetto levels or obvious urban decay. Providence may or may not count as well, not sure. Cities like New Bedford and Fall River are rather poor but nothing really run-down or very high crime. Some smaller cities in Pennsylvania (esp NE) may count (Scranton, Allentown?) and perhaps upstate.

Boston doesn't really have run down areas but it has several sections have high violent crime, much worse than the city average. New York City today has extremely gritty areas but not really decay; but again has concentrated areas of violent crime.
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Old 11-16-2016, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
Apartment buildings are not considered residential? Are they interconnected?

http://www.yoyouheardradio.com/wp-co...a0e81b6a_b.jpg

Playing with semantics as usual.. btw, I've seen row houses with graffiti on the sides...
It's not semantics. A rowhouse is a single-family house which is attached on one or both sides. Apartment buildings, with or without first-floor commercial, are not rowhouses.
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Old 11-16-2016, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,407,950 times
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Spokane.
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