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Old 11-15-2016, 04:38 PM
 
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Anyone spend a good deal of time living at a high elevation who wasn't from a high elevation to start?

Supposedly it messes with the mixture in your brain and can lead to depression starting at 2,000 to 3,000 feet. Less oxygen and so forth.

I've been at high elevation for a bit, but not really higher than I am at the moment in the long term (about 2,100 to 2,200 ft currently).

Looking at Boise specifically that I believe is somewhere around 2,700 ft. Guess that isn't a big change, but I'd rather not find out the hard way if that study does in fact turn out to be true.
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Old 11-15-2016, 05:55 PM
 
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That isn't high elevation. Your body adjusts over time.

People move to Denver and Flagstaff and Reno etc all the time.
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Old 11-15-2016, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Anything under 7,500-8,000' will likely be no big deal for a vast majority of folks. The oxygen level at Boise's elevation (2700') isn't appreciably lower than where you are now.

When I go hiking in the mountains I don't really notice the elevation until about 11,500'.
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Old 11-15-2016, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Anything under 7,500-8,000' will likely be no big deal for a vast majority of folks.
I generally agree with this. When I lived in Denver, which is, of course, 5,280, I never noticed it, even on Day 1 living there.

We had a place in the mountains at 9,700 and it was noticeable to me. Going up the stairs winded me on the first day there and sleeping was not as restful. Plus, it affected food. Bags of chips would be puffed out like a tick, carbonated beverages would go flat almost immediately and opening a can of rolls or biscuits was downright dangerous, LOL.
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Old 11-15-2016, 08:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
I generally agree with this. When I lived in Denver, which is, of course, 5,280, I never noticed it, even on Day 1 living there.

We had a place in the mountains at 9,700 and it was noticeable to me. Going up the stairs winded me on the first day there and sleeping was not as restful. Plus, it affected food. Bags of chips would be puffed out like a tick, carbonated beverages would go flat almost immediately and opening a can of rolls or biscuits was downright dangerous, LOL.
Yep. Spent a lot of time in the Eastern Sierras (June/Mammoth) and Flagstaff (both around 8,000). Definitely need some time to adjust.
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Old 11-15-2016, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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I live about 26' above sea level.
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Old 11-16-2016, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,086 posts, read 1,068,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Port Pitt Ash View Post
Anyone spend a good deal of time living at a high elevation who wasn't from a high elevation to start?

Supposedly it messes with the mixture in your brain and can lead to depression starting at 2,000 to 3,000 feet. Less oxygen and so forth.

I've been at high elevation for a bit, but not really higher than I am at the moment in the long term (about 2,100 to 2,200 ft currently).

Looking at Boise specifically that I believe is somewhere around 2,700 ft. Guess that isn't a big change, but I'd rather not find out the hard way if that study does in fact turn out to be true.
Like others have said, you should have no trouble adjusting to the elevation change between Asheville and Boise. I think the difference in climate (sunnier with much less precipitation, hotter, drier summers and colder, somewhat snowier winters) would be more noticeable to you. And even then, Boise is relatively mild for being that far north and west.

Last edited by bartonizer; 11-16-2016 at 05:28 AM..
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Old 11-16-2016, 08:18 AM
 
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So if it isn't the elevation what is it? Isolation?
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Old 11-16-2016, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,407,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Port Pitt Ash View Post
Anyone spend a good deal of time living at a high elevation who wasn't from a high elevation to start?

Supposedly it messes with the mixture in your brain and can lead to depression starting at 2,000 to 3,000 feet. Less oxygen and so forth.

I've been at high elevation for a bit, but not really higher than I am at the moment in the long term (about 2,100 to 2,200 ft currently).

Looking at Boise specifically that I believe is somewhere around 2,700 ft. Guess that isn't a big change, but I'd rather not find out the hard way if that study does in fact turn out to be true.
I was born at 30 feet
I was raised at 700-1200 feet (a little happy/unhappy) and 82 feet (pretty happy there)
I've lived at 2200 feet (not particularly happy there)
at 5280 feet (not particularly happy here)
at 1800 feet briefly (pretty happy there)

So I guess if you are susceptible to depression, don't risk it. I think the barrenness/dryness get to me more than the elevation. Not a fan of the social climate in the unhappy places either.....but it's probably just ME!!! LOLOLOL
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Old 11-16-2016, 09:25 AM
 
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You will probably get more personal answers in the Boise forum as there are a lot of transplants to Boise from the West Coast who gained elevation by moving.

The climate is much better and happier compared to other major cities in the mountain west states such as CO and UT imo. Keep in mind that when you head up into the beautiful mountains above the city that you may experience some dizziness, etc, if you are not used to a higher elevation.
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