U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-28-2016, 02:35 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,657 posts, read 28,685,250 times
Reputation: 43674

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jakeryan View Post
...... I had a terrible time living in the middle of the Dutch Bible Belt - Calvinistic, conservative locals that could really lynch me if it was not punishable......
I'm surprised to hear that. What city in the USA was that? There's a big Pennsylvania Dutch farming community, but I've always found them to be polite. It's difficult to imagine them trying to lynch anyone. They'd be much more likely to try to sell you a jar of home made jam at their farm stands.

And which is it? Do you want to visit or are you looking for a place in the USA to live. You won't be able to live in the USA without getting a resident's visa, which is not easy to come by. Unless you happen to already be a USA citizen living abroad and about to come home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-28-2016, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Northern US
64 posts, read 49,590 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I'm surprised to hear that. What city in the USA was that? There's a big Pennsylvania Dutch farming community, but I've always found them to be polite. It's difficult to imagine them trying to lynch anyone. They'd be much more likely to try to sell you a jar of home made jam at their farm stands.

And which is it? Do you want to visit or are you looking for a place in the USA to live. You won't be able to live in the USA without getting a resident's visa, which is not easy to come by. Unless you happen to already be a USA citizen living abroad and about to come home.
I believe it is an area of the actual Netherlands which is in the northern part of the country and is very conservative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-29-2016, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,009 posts, read 54,523,130 times
Reputation: 66356
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I'm surprised to hear that. What city in the USA was that? There's a big Pennsylvania Dutch farming community, but I've always found them to be polite. It's difficult to imagine them trying to lynch anyone. They'd be much more likely to try to sell you a jar of home made jam at their farm stands.

And which is it? Do you want to visit or are you looking for a place in the USA to live. You won't be able to live in the USA without getting a resident's visa, which is not easy to come by. Unless you happen to already be a USA citizen living abroad and about to come home.
Pennsylvania Dutch are not Dutch, but German. The name is a corruption of Deutsch. Different culture.

Dutch people settled in Michigan and Iowa, as well as the earliest Dutch in NY and NJ. The Dutch Reformed Church and its descendants, the Reformed Church in Ametica and the Christian Reformed Church, are Calvinists. Strict, dark version of Christianity focused on sin and hell and death. Very conservative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2016, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
457 posts, read 436,927 times
Reputation: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
For a visitor from out of the country, it seems some level of tourist developed rural attraction is needed.

Vermont seems the most obvious first choice. Bear in mind its closest international transatlantic service airport is Montreal (3 to 3.5 hours drive), although there is very slow (by Euro standards) rail service from New York City to the two largest "cities" Burlington or Rutland (two very different routes).

Attractions also have significant seasonality. Vermont's main rural attractions appear to be open fairly lengthy seasons https://www.cabotcheese.coop/cabot-visitor-center-tours https://shelburnemuseum.org/visit/ Ben & Jerry's Factory Tour and Ice Cream Shop in Vermont

The area around Ithaca, NY tends to have smaller attractions that are not open outside a May-Sept (sometimes even June-August) high season, and less likely to see international visitors. The closest airports to Ithaca with meaningful transatlantic international service are Philadelphia and Toronto (four hours one way drive each), each slightly closer than the New York City airports (closer to five hours driving).

Possibly the easiest to reach rural USA attractions for the European would be Lancaster and Hershey, PA. These are in a more politically conservative area (although Hershey is in Dauphin county which barely voted for Obama and Hillary Clinton) but are Uber-ride distance from rail stations with what by USA standards is frequent rail service with one change to either Philadelphia or Newark (one of the New York City area) international airports. If driving, the most convenient to Lancaster and Hershey may be Baltimore (Baltimore-Washington International, BWI) followed closely by Philadelphia (either 1.5 hr drive plus traffic).
It really depends on what part of the state you are in as far as distance to a major airport although the general standard is a 2-4 hour drive to Logan International Airport in Boston I suppose someone could use Montreal International but most people just drive further to Boston or fly out of Burlington on a non direct flight.

Western Massachusetts would be another option for a liberal and rural area and is just under two hours from Boston and about 3 hours from NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2016, 07:47 PM
 
56,546 posts, read 80,847,919 times
Reputation: 12490
Quote:
Originally Posted by citylover94 View Post
It really depends on what part of the state you are in as far as distance to a major airport although the general standard is a 2-4 hour drive to Logan International Airport in Boston I suppose someone could use Montreal International but most people just drive further to Boston or fly out of Burlington on a non direct flight.

Western Massachusetts would be another option for a liberal and rural area and is just under two hours from Boston and about 3 hours from NYC.
What about Albany or Hartford/Springfield as potential options?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2016, 06:25 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,712,249 times
Reputation: 3788
Air Canada could be a good possibility for one-transfer flights across the Atlantic from the inland Northeast US. Flights from Toronto Pearson (YYZ) to the smaller "international" airports (such as Burlington VT or Harrisburg) clear US Customs in Toronto.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2016, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
1,723 posts, read 1,138,164 times
Reputation: 1294
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakeryan View Post
We all know that liberals tend to live in bigger urban areas. But what are some rural/country areas in the USA where there are liberal people? What if you are a liberal, a foreigner but you want to visit a farm?

Life in the Calvinistic protestant Dutch bible belt with conservative values has taught me that some rural places tend to be very friendly... as long as you're a local. But I felt relieved when I moved to a larger city in the more liberal Southern (Catholic) Netherlands.

Well, I definitely have much better understanding of English than Dutch, but I bet as a guy from Eastern Europe they might notice some discrepancies in my speech, etc. and make me feel excluded or make fun of me. I am apolitical, yet my views are mostly aligned with liberalism, especially after going abroad and becoming "the Other". I know from first hand what it means to be excluded, locals to give you angry looks and brush you off with offensive hand gestures as you have an accent.

I am going on a vacation to the USA and in addition to the Big Apple I'd also like to visit a typical American farm with barns, bales of hay, huge fields, etc. However, I realize that rural area residents are often intolerant to outsiders, not to mention foreigners. But I love nature and farmlands, the lush green or yellow fields, you name it. Village-like towns are welcome as well. My ideal thing would be something of a hippy rural community with less drugs lol. Any ideas?
Since it sounds like you're going to be in the eastern part of the U.S. explore parts of Vermont, New Hampshire and western MA.
Generally speaking you will not find that people are intolerant of you in rural New England. New England is a relatively small area and even the rural parts are, generally speaking, sufficiently plugged into metro areas and aren't as provincial as many other rural areas of the country.
Explore the Connecticut River Valley. Dartmouth College is on the New Hampshire side of the connecticut river in Hanover, N.H.. That entire valley is lush and beautiful.
Explore Middlebury Vermont and the surrounding areas.
And / or western Massachusetts .... google Smith College, Hampshire, University of MA (Amherst).
I'm suggesting these college towns / areas so that you can experience some lovely rural, pastoral areas of New England that are in proximity to good colleges so that you might feel a bit more comfortable due to the prevalence of educated people and people who tend to be liberal / tolerant / open etc.. This is not to suggest that other areas of New England would be intolerant. It's just that college towns in rural areas might feel more familiar to you .... somewhat orienting if you know what i mean.
Some images of rural New England :
https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...k1.eUwNqtGV_J8
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2016, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Salinas, CA
15,016 posts, read 4,797,028 times
Reputation: 8076
Quote:
Originally Posted by SciFiNerd1 View Post
Athens, Ohio
Northfield, Minnesota
Duluth, Minnesota
Lawrence, Kansas
Asheville, North Carolina

Most of Vermont
Agree about all five of those city choices and Vermont. Have visited both Duluth and Northfield. Know a former co-worker that moved to Asheville.

The Mankato-St. Peter region of Minnesota also qualifies IMO. Both are college towns. Democratic politicians are competitive locally and nationally. Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter hosts an annual Nobel Conference that features acclaimed speakers in many fields including science, medicine, politics, demographics, economics, etc. It started back in 1965; 19 years before the more publicized TED conference in Aspen, CO.

There are a lot of moderates and liberals in that area. There are farms and pastoral scenery in the region and even a few wineries. There are some rolling hills and the Minnesota River valley, too. It is not all flat land.

As a bonus: If you like bicycling, the Mankato area has an excellent trail system. If you like quality beer, the town of New Ulm, known for its German heritage festivals and not too far away, has the second oldest brewery in the US open for tours and tasting: August Schell's Brewery.

Home | Schell's Beer Schell's Brewery.

Last edited by chessgeek; 12-21-2016 at 06:11 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2016, 07:34 PM
 
339 posts, read 294,149 times
Reputation: 481
The Driftless region of Wisconsin.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top