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Old 12-05-2016, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
457 posts, read 437,137 times
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The North End of Boston is essentially entirely made up of that style of housing and several other neighborhoods like Chinatown, the Theatre District, Leather District, Fenway and parts of Allston near Comm Ave all have areas that are almost entirely apartment buildings. The more central areas have mostly 4-7 story buildings and the less centrally located have mostly 3-5 story buildings.

North End

Source

Leather District

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Fenway

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Allston

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Source
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:26 PM
 
1,274 posts, read 1,033,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
I would say that Cincinnati has some of them as well, but not Chicago or Baltimore. Remember, the OP's examples of tenement style housing are attached skinny 5 plus story apartment buildings that often have retail at the bottom, and often fire escapes attached to the facade. Chicago is mostly tall and wide apartment buildings or detached apartment flat buildings.
I agree, I don't think Baltimore has any real tenement blocks. The closest you are going to get is something that has been converted into something like a real tenement, like this: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3037...2!8i6656?hl=en
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Old 12-05-2016, 09:33 PM
 
6,816 posts, read 6,949,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylover94 View Post
The North End of Boston is essentially entirely made up of that style of housing and several other neighborhoods like Chinatown, the Theatre District, Leather District, Fenway and parts of Allston near Comm Ave all have areas that are almost entirely apartment buildings. The more central areas have mostly 4-7 story buildings and the less centrally located have mostly 3-5 story buildings.

North End

Source

Leather District

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Fenway

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Allston

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Source
Are those really tenements or just older midrise apartments?
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Old 12-06-2016, 08:40 AM
 
1,814 posts, read 3,424,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Are those really tenements or just older midrise apartments?
That's where you get into difficulty-- i.e., is there a clear difference between a tenement house and an apartment house? Obviously Park Avenue and Fifth Avenue have apartments and Mott Street has tenements but at the mid-price level is the difference as clear? I don't think so. In the Boston case, North End and the back of Beacon Hill have brick 4-story walkups that are clearly tenements (they were thick in the West End too but urban renewal wiped the slate clean there.) The Allston and Fenway buildings were built for middle class or lower middle class tenants. They have bigger rooms and better layouts but mostly no elevators. Even without elevators I wouldn't call them tenements because of the superior interior layouts as compared to narrow North End railroad flat-style tenements.

These brick mid-rise apartments are all over the streetcar suburbs-- Allston-Brighton, Brookline, Cambridge, Roxbury-Dorchester, Malden, Chelsea. But they were never as popular as the wooden three decker house which you see only in New England cities.

Note: CityLover's Leather District photo shows commercial buildings converted in recent years to residential use, like those in SoHo NYC. Not tenements.
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Old 12-06-2016, 08:41 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Are those really tenements or just older midrise apartments?
A tenement is an older midrise apartment buildings that was resided in by the poor; it's a subjective distinction.
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Old 12-06-2016, 02:15 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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I thought he meant the architectural style.
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Old 12-06-2016, 11:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
I thought he meant the architectural style.
You're right, basically older midrise buildings.
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Old 12-06-2016, 11:09 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,481 posts, read 2,225,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I haven't really seen anywhere else in the US yet with midrise tenement apartments like you see in much of NYC.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7186...7i13312!8i6656

I think San Francisco might have some comparable neighborhoods but other than that I can't think of anything.
Thanks in part to the Great Fire, Chicago actively tried to not be like NYC in this regard. When NYC style tenements started appearing in Chicago, the city passed the 1902 tenement ordinance that essentially blocked them. The ordinance is why Chicago has so many courtyard apartment buildings. Two-flats were also extremely popular in the same time period.

A courtyard building:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9546...8i6656!6m1!1e1

Two-flats:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8524...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:51 AM
 
2,211 posts, read 1,675,208 times
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Pittsburgh has them all over the city

https://www.google.com/maps/place/E+...827298!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4287...8i6656!6m1!1e1


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4431...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4381...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4535...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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Old 12-07-2016, 09:03 AM
 
2,211 posts, read 1,675,208 times
Reputation: 2031
Pittsburgh also has a gentrified version

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4432...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4437...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4436...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4695...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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