U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-05-2016, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,036 posts, read 4,557,076 times
Reputation: 1422

Advertisements

Shreveport, Baton Rouge, New Orleans (crime cities)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-05-2016, 01:19 AM
 
1,194 posts, read 876,650 times
Reputation: 1867
It needs to be a big, horrible city to pull down an entire state's image. I don' think any city, or even a group of cities, like the IE or the Central Valley cities, have enough influence to have much effect on the image of California.

For Michigan, you have city of Detroit (although it might be starting to turn the corner in a few neighborhoods), as well as Flint, which have suffered from de-industrialization, population loss, and blight. The suburbs of Detroit and many of the rural areas in the state are quite nice, but people always think of Flint and Detroit first.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 01:41 AM
 
189 posts, read 109,456 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
It needs to be a big, horrible city to pull down an entire state's image. I don' think any city, or even a group of cities, like the IE or the Central Valley cities, have enough influence to have much effect on the image of California.

For Michigan, you have city of Detroit (although it might be starting to turn the corner in a few neighborhoods), as well as Flint, which have suffered from de-industrialization, population loss, and blight. The suburbs of Detroit and many of the rural areas in the state are quite nice, but people always think of Flint and Detroit first.
How about a wretched hive of scum and villainy?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 05:00 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,511 posts, read 3,962,942 times
Reputation: 1853
Youngstown, Ohio. In proportion to its size, no other Ohio city has lost as much industry as this once proud steel town in the Mahoning River valley. Youngstown epitomizes "Rustbelt" like no other region in the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,402,528 times
Reputation: 2089
Youngstown would fit this description but I think it's too small to have any real impact on Ohio's overall image. Honestly I would say it's the rural areas that are detrimental to the state's image.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 06:49 AM
 
3,597 posts, read 1,529,535 times
Reputation: 3028
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Oklahoma City in Oklahoma. Oklahoma is one of those states that is usually grouped with Mississippi and Alabama as being one of the least desirable places to live in the country. Most people don't realize that Tulsa is actually a nice small city. Many of the Oklahoma stereotypes (ultra-conservative, tornadoes, boring, flat, dry, etc) don't apply to Tulsa to the extent they do to central Oklahoma. I think if Tulsa were in any other state, it would be a much more popular place, but it carries a stigma because it's in Oklahoma. It's kind of like Biloxi Mississippi, which actually isn't bad, but because it's Mississippi people have preconceived notions.
I agree with your take. OK doesn't get the credit it deserves. Underappreciated for sure. But I wonder if most people would consider ultra-conservative and ultra liberal in the same negative vein? Just curious.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,511 posts, read 3,962,942 times
Reputation: 1853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Youngstown would fit this description but I think it's too small to have any real impact on Ohio's overall image. Honestly I would say it's the rural areas that are detrimental to the state's image.
I disagree. Youngstown's decline from a mid sized industrial city into a much smaller Rustbelt relic easily makes it the poster child of Ohio's alleged demise. Rural areas were not included in the OP's discussion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 10:00 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,007 posts, read 4,115,699 times
Reputation: 7679
Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
I agree with your take. OK doesn't get the credit it deserves. Underappreciated for sure. But I wonder if most people would consider ultra-conservative and ultra liberal in the same negative vein? Just curious.
Possibly, but by different groups of people. Ultra-liberal places, like San Francisco or Portland, generally have a much higher quality of life and much better image than ultra-conservative places like Oklahoma and Alabama. There are exceptions like Detroit, which is an example of a failed liberal city. However, I am not aware of a single vibrant far-right city. Even red state cities like Austin, Dallas, Atlanta, etc are blue at the local level.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 10:29 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,375,616 times
Reputation: 18517
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Possibly, but by different groups of people. Ultra-liberal places, like San Francisco or Portland, generally have a much higher quality of life and much better image than ultra-conservative places like Oklahoma and Alabama. There are exceptions like Detroit, which is an example of a failed liberal city. However, I am not aware of a single vibrant far-right city. Even red state cities like Austin, Dallas, Atlanta, etc are blue at the local level.
There's really no such thing as an ultra conservative major city in the U.S. There are major cities with a conservative bent like San Diego but nothing close to being ultra conservative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2016, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
742 posts, read 720,677 times
Reputation: 795
^ No use in trying to communicate that to bawac, he's hopelessly misguided. Even the core of OKC is not very conservative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Many of the Oklahoma stereotypes (ultra-conservative, tornadoes, boring, flat, dry, etc) don't apply to Tulsa to the extent they do to central Oklahoma.
Tulsa is more conservative than OKC, and only receives 4.5 inches more precipitation than OKC annually. Hardly dryer than Tulsa.

Last edited by KayneMo; 12-05-2016 at 10:53 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top