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Old 12-05-2016, 01:31 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,157 posts, read 4,179,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
It's somewhat hard to believe that Tulsa is significantly less evangelical than OKC. Tulsa has long been a stronghold of evangelicalism and home to some of the most prominent evangelicals in the country (Oral Roberts, Kenneth Hagin, Billy Joe Dougherty, Carlton Pearson, etc.).
Oral Roberts University is less prominent than it once was. Also, I would hardly say a small university with only 4,000 students in representative of the city of Tulsa.

I am not certain that it has always been that way, but it is true that Tulsa in 2016 is less evangelical than OKC and also is home to more "Nones." When I am in Tulsa, it doesn't feel like the evangelical right have quite the stranglehold on the culture that they do in OKC. That doesn't mean that Tulsa isn't a Bible Belt city, but it is less so than OKC.
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Old 12-05-2016, 01:33 PM
 
29,984 posts, read 27,526,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Oral Roberts University is less prominent than it once was. Also, I would hardly say a small university with only 4,000 students in representative of the city of Tulsa.

I am not certain that it has always been that way, but it is true that Tulsa in 2016 is less evangelical than OKC and also is home to more "Nones." When I am in Tulsa, it doesn't feel like the evangelical right have quite the stranglehold on the culture that they do in OKC. That doesn't mean that Tulsa isn't a Bible Belt city, but it is less so than OKC.
It's not just ORU though; some of the biggest names in the evangelical community have been based in Tulsa. But I see where you're coming from.
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Old 12-05-2016, 01:39 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,157 posts, read 4,179,677 times
Reputation: 7775
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
It's not just ORU though; some of the biggest names in the evangelical community have been based in Tulsa. But I see where you're coming from.
I agree. Times do change though and the country as a whole is trending away from evangelicalism (some areas doing so much faster than others).

I think Charlotte is a city that has been hugely influential in the evangelical movement, with people like Billy Graham, Franklin Graham, the Benham family, Rick Joyner, Stephen Furtick, Tammy Faye, etc all hailing from there. However, in 2016 Charlotte has moved beyond it's Bible Belt roots for the most part and is a pretty diverse, tolerant place.
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Old 12-05-2016, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
747 posts, read 726,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Tulsa is less evangelical by a good deal, and because of that, it doesn't "feel" as conservative. Tulsa also has a much higher level of "nones". Voting patterns don't tell the entire story. Oklahoma City is considerably more conservative on social issues (religion, separation of church and state, LGBT issues) than Tulsa is. From my experience, Tulsa Republicanism is more "less government, Don't Tread On Me" Republicanism while OKC is more "Reclaim America for Christ" Republicanism.
Nor does religious affiliation tell the entire story. Nevertheless, Tulsa County has voted more Republican than Oklahoma County in the last four elections.

Republican votes:

Oklahoma County
2016 - 51.7%
2012 - 58.3%
2008 - 58.4%
2004 - 64.2%

Tulsa County
2016 - 58.4%
2012 - 63.7%
2008 - 62.2%
2004 - 64.4%
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Old 12-05-2016, 03:40 PM
 
1,593 posts, read 840,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Russbosma View Post
Brockton, Lawrence, Lowell, Springfield, Holyoke, Fall River, New Bedford, Chelsea
But how many people outside of New England have even heard of them? To hurt the states reputation nationally they have to have some kind of recognition nationally. Maybe Springfield because it always shows up on those most dangerous cities list.
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Old 12-05-2016, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
5,920 posts, read 6,356,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Honestly I would say it's the rural areas that are detrimental to the state's image.
Yeah the rustic scenery, low crime and the friendly hard working people really give the state's image a black eye.
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Old 12-05-2016, 05:42 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,157 posts, read 4,179,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woxyroxme View Post
Yeah the rustic scenery, low crime and the friendly hard working people really give the state's image a black eye.
It depends on what the rural economy is like in your state. In many Southern states, rural areas have a huge problem with extreme poverty, drugs (meth), broken families, boarded-up downtowns replaced by a Wal-Mart Supercenter, and low education. I recommend watching the movie Winters Bone for a gimpse into life in rural Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, or virtually any other Southern state. "Mayberry" today can mostly be found in rural New England and in places in the Mountain West. The rural South has been decimated by Wal-Mart and the collapse of the manufacturing sector that once was the bedrock of it's economy.
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Old 12-05-2016, 05:46 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,016 posts, read 6,397,922 times
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Gary, Flint, Ferguson
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Old 12-05-2016, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,661 posts, read 4,052,927 times
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walmart helps local economies, not hurts. numerous studies have shown this. bunch of mom and pops open up near walmarts.
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Old 12-05-2016, 05:58 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,157 posts, read 4,179,677 times
Reputation: 7775
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
walmart helps local economies, not hurts. numerous studies have shown this. bunch of mom and pops open up near walmarts.
I disagree.

It's mostly other chain stores and chain fast food restaurants that open up around Wal-Mart, and the town's main street withers away. When you consider what most of these chain service businesses pay and the loss of manufacturing jobs, it's easy to see why the rural South is so impoverished.
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