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Old 06-26-2019, 03:27 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,820 posts, read 12,326,456 times
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I'd say the least stereotypical places in Ohio would be both Columbus and extreme Southern Ohio, like around Proctorville, Ironton, South Point etc along the West Virginia and Kentucky borders.

Columbus stands out not just in Ohio but in the entire Upper Midwest for its modern buildings, prosperous economy and sprawling modern suburbs. A lot of that area reminded me more of Charlotte and Atlanta than other older Midwest cities like Cleveland. Other than there you don't really get modern Midwest cities until you get to Kansas City, Wichita or Omaha. Southern Ohio is also distinct because of its Appalachian location, and the accents are also more like Eastern Kentucky and West Virginia and there is also coal mining there. Proctorville and Ironton would be more at home in WV than in Ohio.

For stereotypical Ohio, I would say either a decayed, crumbling Rust Belt city like Toledo or Akron, or a charming, classic heartland town set amid corn and wheat fields like Lancaster. The thing about Ohio is that both of these stereotypes are strong vs other Midwest states where one dominates over the other, wheras in Michigan the dominant stereotype is simply the crumbling Rust Belt city like Detroit, Dearborn, Port Huron or Flint despite Michigan also having many rural areas. For Indiana the classic image is simply the small rural town in farm country though Indianapolis is a large city and Indiana also has its share of Rust Belt areas like Gary and South Bend.
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Old 06-26-2019, 06:11 PM
 
67 posts, read 23,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Yeah, I think Millennials (who are socially aware, maybe especially ones in cities) tend to see Texas as a cool, diverse, international state. The "everything's big, we drive everywhere, we don't care about pollution" stereotype is still there, but at the least I think young people see Texas as more libertarian or moderate than Bible Belt conservative.
I relocated to the Dallas, TX area last year from PA and I find it to more socially conservative than libertarian.
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Old 06-27-2019, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,232 posts, read 2,508,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post

Columbus stands out not just in Ohio but in the entire Upper Midwest for its modern buildings, prosperous economy and sprawling modern suburbs. A lot of that area reminded me more of Charlotte and Atlanta than other older Midwest cities like Cleveland. Other than there you don't really get modern Midwest cities until you get to Kansas City, Wichita or Omaha. Southern Ohio is also distinct because of its Appalachian location, and the accents are also more like Eastern Kentucky and West Virginia and there is also coal mining there. Proctorville and Ironton would be more at home in WV than in Ohio.
What about Grand Rapids, Minneapolis, and especially Indianapolis? Columbus and Indianapolis are very similar. They're all "newer". I agree that they aren't similar to the legacy cities of the region.
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Old 06-27-2019, 10:49 AM
 
29,919 posts, read 27,365,450 times
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Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
What about Grand Rapids, Minneapolis, and especially Indianapolis? Columbus and Indianapolis are very similar. They're all "newer". I agree that they aren't similar to the legacy cities of the region.
You can also throw in Omaha, Des Moines, and Madison.
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Old 06-27-2019, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,379 posts, read 1,195,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Columbus stands out not just in Ohio but in the entire Upper Midwest for its modern buildings, prosperous economy and sprawling modern suburbs.
In what universe is Columbus (and Ohio) in the Upper Midwest? And how is Columbus not just a smaller version of the Twin Cities?
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Old 06-27-2019, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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For Minnesota, I'd say that the area least like the stereotype (think Fargo, A Prairie Home Companion, Grumpy Old Men, or Drop Dead Gorgeous) is the Twin Cities metro.

The area most like the stereotype is the rest of Minnesota.
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Old 06-27-2019, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
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Pittsburgh fits the hilly rustbelt-esque stereotype of Pennsylvania pretty well even though Pittsburgh isn't that much of a Rust Belt city anymore but facts be damned--we are talking stereotypes

Neither Erie or Philadelphia seem to fit in with the Pennsylvania stereotypes for different reasons. Philadelphia is a large city that is definitely not part of the Rust Belt and Erie is a Rust Belt city but could really fit in any of the Great Lakes region states.
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Old 06-28-2019, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,232 posts, read 2,508,551 times
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Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
In what universe is Columbus (and Ohio) in the Upper Midwest? And how is Columbus not just a smaller version of the Twin Cities?
Those of us from extreme Northern OH like to delude ourselves into thinking we're part of the Upper Midwest . Columbus is definitely not.
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Old 06-28-2019, 01:24 PM
Status: "Hungry" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: Chiraq, Crook County
1,242 posts, read 798,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
Those of us from extreme Northern OH like to delude ourselves into thinking we're part of the Upper Midwest . Columbus is definitely not.
I mean Cleveland and Toledo are about on the same latitude as Chicago, which many people consider to be "upper Midwest", so I don't think it's that crazy. Though I guess even Chicago is a bit of a stretch in reality.
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Old 06-28-2019, 02:04 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,820 posts, read 12,326,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
In what universe is Columbus (and Ohio) in the Upper Midwest? And how is Columbus not just a smaller version of the Twin Cities?
I include Ohio in the Upper Midwest especially as it borders the Great Lakes. I would say that Lower Midwest would be Missouri, Kansas, and possibly Oklahoma.
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