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Old 12-11-2016, 01:44 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
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New Mexico

Most....Santa Fe

Least....Hobbs
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:06 AM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL
4,392 posts, read 3,556,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
It is a Southern City.
Yes but it's has a much larger transplant population than people think. It's not a Jackson MS where the vast majority of migration is within the Jackson area. I'm not saying it's Boston, but it's not Macon either.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
personally, i don't feel like ATL is different than other southern cities i have lived in like Greenville and Huntsville, other than it has more people, traffic and taller buildings downtown.
Huntsville has a strong science presence so it has a lot of transplants to the area. Greenville is growing fast so it's getting there but neither have the more cosmopolitan feel to them.
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
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your whole premise is that transplants make it different or superior. they are just people. and the reality is most natives in the south have ancestors who were transplants, people have been moving to the south for decades. i grew up in a small town in SC in the 80s and there were tons of people who had moved from Ohio and New York, etc.
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Old 12-11-2016, 07:22 PM
 
985 posts, read 1,086,423 times
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Texas

Folks outside of the state has this perception that usually includes dryer, arid, climates so Midland/Odessa through west Texas is the most stereotypical . I think Houston is the least stereotypical with all of its bayous, moss covered oak trees, palms, etc. All characteristics that people normally don't associate with Texas. Plus its a lot more international than the rest of the state.
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Old 12-11-2016, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
3,740 posts, read 2,558,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atony View Post
North Carolina:

Most: I lean towards Greensboro. I feel like the triad region probably represents what North Carolina is as a state.

Least: Asheville I'd say. A great hippie mountain town, but not really representative of North Carolina as a whole.
Definitely agree that Greensboro/Triad covers "standard" NC...

I'm sure others would argue against this but I think the "least NC" is Pinehurst/Southern Pines....feels more like Florida than NC to me.

If we could vote someone off the island though; I think my vote would go to Kinston or Rocky Mount.
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:17 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL
4,392 posts, read 3,556,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
your whole premise is that transplants make it different or superior. they are just people. and the reality is most natives in the south have ancestors who were transplants, people have been moving to the south for decades. i grew up in a small town in SC in the 80s and there were tons of people who had moved from Ohio and New York, etc.
Not necessarily better but definitely different. There's a clear difference.
This map shows the % of population born in a different country. Excluding Texas and Florida, Atlanta stands out from the rest of the south except for what appears to be Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham and even then they aren't quite on the same order. Now that's just one measure but it adds the different feel much of metro Atlanta has. Even within the region you can see big differences from towns like Johns Creek and towns like Braselton.
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Old 12-12-2016, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Delaware

Most - Atlantic Beaches (Rehoboth, Bethany, Fenwick) & Dover (Dover Downs)
Least - Wilmington/New Castle

Ohio

Most - Columbus (OSU), Cleveland
Least - Cincinnati

Pennsylvania

Most - State College/Altoona region
Least - Philly
In my opinion Columbus is far from the most stereotypical Ohio town. I don't think people unfamiliar with the state think of a large lgbt population, put together suburbs or revitalizing urban neighborhoods.

If anything I think people think of A) farms or B)failing industry.
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Old 12-12-2016, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,492 posts, read 1,595,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcopolo2000 View Post
Folks outside of the state has this perception that usually includes dryer, arid, climates so Midland/Odessa through west Texas is the most stereotypical . I think Houston is the least stereotypical with all of its bayous, moss covered oak trees, palms, etc. All characteristics that people normally don't associate with Texas. Plus its a lot more international than the rest of the state.
I would say Galveston is the least stereotypical Texas city. (Which can be thought of as a distant suburb of Houston.) It's compact, walkable, and even reminiscent of New Orleans, one of the quirkiest cities in the US. By contrast, other Texas cities are highly spread-out, with a strong "Middle America" feel to them.

A close contender would be South Padre Island. It looks like a piece of coastal Florida was copy/pasted into Texas.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:16 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,235,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
In my opinion Columbus is far from the most stereotypical Ohio town. I don't think people unfamiliar with the state think of a large lgbt population, put together suburbs or revitalizing urban neighborhoods.

If anything I think people think of A) farms or B)failing industry.
I agree it's probably not the most like Ohio, but then there's Cincinnati. Columbus has OSU, farms outside of the city, and is flat like your typical midwestern state. That screams Ohio in that sense. Cincy is almost in Kentucky and very hilly in comparison. I don't think many equate that with Ohio.
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,581 posts, read 3,994,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
Not necessarily better but definitely different. There's a clear difference.
This map shows the % of population born in a different country. Excluding Texas and Florida, Atlanta stands out from the rest of the south except for what appears to be Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham and even then they aren't quite on the same order. Now that's just one measure but it adds the different feel much of metro Atlanta has. Even within the region you can see big differences from towns like Johns Creek and towns like Braselton.

my twin bro lives in ATL, he's never talked about any difference and i've noticed any difference. i don't think transplants and native southerners are that foreign to each other. and there are transplants in basically every town in the south except the one stoplight ones.

Moreover, people relocating to the south isn't a new thing, it been going on for 100 plus years. most of the people you view as natives had parents or grandparents or great grandparents who moved from other places.
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