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Old 06-11-2019, 02:50 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 8 days ago)
 
47,987 posts, read 45,443,916 times
Reputation: 15310

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Massachusetts.

Most: Boston
Least: Worcester or Springfield.

Connecticut.
Most: Fairfield County or Stamford
Least: Hartford

Iowa.
Most: Central Iowa
Least: Far western Iowa
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Old 06-11-2019, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,515 posts, read 702,434 times
Reputation: 1946
Ohio

Most: Springfield (or at least it comes the closest to combining the "flat/white/cornfields" stereotype and the "Rust Belt" stereotype)

Least: Athens (in the Appalachian part of the state and has a good economy)
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Old 06-11-2019, 03:15 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 8 days ago)
 
47,987 posts, read 45,443,916 times
Reputation: 15310
Kentucky.

Most: Eastern Kentucky. Appalachia. This is what alot of people think when they think of Kentucky.
Least: Paducah. Close to the Mississippi River, no one thinks of Kentucky having any part of the Mississippi River.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,681 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63225
Texas:

Most: Fort Worth
Least: Houston

That's a gross generalization, I realize that. I also know that Houston has lots of Texas elements but I think its diversity and southern Gulf Coast influences might surprise a lot of people, not to mention the terrain and weather. Though I've been through El Paso, I don't really remember it so maybe it's the least like a Texas stereotype, I don't know.

I have to say that I think Austin is very stereotypically "Texan" by the way. Same with Dallas. Texas is a big state and I knew its cities were very uniquely different, though still "Texan" when I moved here. So while Austin and Dallas are very different from each other in many ways, I also think they are both quintessentially "Texan." But Fort Worth really seems to embody the most overall attributes, attitude, and stereotypes of so many things that Texas has to offer!

Whenever we have company from out of state, we always take them to Fort Worth to experience "Texas."

I agree with many of the extremes that are mentioned throughout this thread, which makes an interesting read by the way. Interesting to see the different opinions and experiences and expectations expressed.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,842 posts, read 6,181,041 times
Reputation: 6119
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post

Whenever we have company from out of state, we always take them to Fort Worth to experience "Texas."
Quite frankly, if you wanted to take someone to experience their perception of the "Texas" stereotype............you might actually have to take them to Monument Valley, Utah. That is if they are a fan of old westerns.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
400 posts, read 270,294 times
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Pennsylvania:
Most: Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, also smaller cities of Reading, Scranton, Harrisburg, Williamsport, etc. PA is characterized by our old 1700's-1800's built cities, which have good urban bones (walkable), then mature leafy suburbs with older houses on bigger lots, then farmsteads or mountains/state forests.

Least: Erie- far away from most of the state, pretty isolated from the rest of PA, and it is the only city with a large water feature (Lake Erie). Geographically speaking Erie juts out. I guess Erie is closer to Cleveland than Pittsburgh which may be the reason why. Also the area from Erie to Bradford seems to be in a colder climate type than much of the rest of the state.

Maybe North Philadelphia culturally sticks out as well. This is an area of high crime, violence, blight, drug usage. Hopefully it improves itself someday because I think the city has untapped potential. Just doesn't seem like PA to me, it seems like an out-of-control area, this area of the city may be more akin to the inner-city areas of Detroit, Baltimore, or St. Louis. I will say all PA cities have their bad areas, and since Philadelphia is by far the largest, it would stand to reason that its bad area would be the largest. So again, hopefully this gets under control in all PA cities because it is not the state I know and love. Also, I will say some areas of Philadelphia might feel like you are in NYC, so there is that too. Even though there are political differences, I would say characteristically that Philadelphia still belongs with Pennsylvania though. Philadelphia and Pennsylvania are so intertwined with history and heritage.

Last edited by g500; 06-12-2019 at 11:14 AM..
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:56 AM
 
417 posts, read 127,392 times
Reputation: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Massachusetts.

Most: Boston
Least: Worcester or Springfield.

Connecticut.
Most: Fairfield County or Stamford
Least: Hartford

Iowa.
Most: Central Iowa
Least: Far western Iowa
I take it you haven't been to the Driftless Area.

For Iowa, I'd say north central/northwest Iowa is the most similar to the stereotype. Driving from Des Moines to Minneapolis cuts right through this area. This would be (very generally) anything north of Highway 30 and west of Highway 63. Wide open endless fields of corn and soybeans, with grain elevators dotting the endless horizon and lots of hog confinements and cattle lots. Generally quite flat, with the exception of the Loess Hills, which are really a tiny sliver.

The least stereotypical part of Iowa is the Driftless Area, outlined here:

It's a topographically rugged area that resembles the Ozarks (but smaller), and much more forested than the rest of the state. It's culturally very similar to Wisconsin, and has much less of the widespread grain farming you see in the rest of the state.
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon (in Transition)
883 posts, read 438,805 times
Reputation: 1445
Minnesota:

Most: New Ulm or really any smaller city or town in the middle of the state. MSP for passive aggressiveness

Least:

Geography - Duluth
Culture -MSP (except Minnesota Nice)
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Old 06-12-2019, 01:15 PM
 
417 posts, read 127,392 times
Reputation: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by cornsnicker3 View Post
Minnesota:

Most: New Ulm or really any smaller city or town in the middle of the state. MSP for passive aggressiveness

Least:

Geography - Duluth
Culture -MSP (except Minnesota Nice)
New Ulm is a great pick for stereotypical Minnesota.

Likewise with Minneapolis for least, as big city culture (which is what the Twin Cities are) doesn't fit the Lake Wobegon/Drop Dead Gorgeous stereotype.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:10 PM
 
3,550 posts, read 1,516,044 times
Reputation: 2989
I'll go with state where I've lived:

North Carolina:
Most: Greensboro/Winston Salem area
Least: The city of Asheville

Florida:
Most: The Tampa/Orlando corridor
Least: Panhandle area

Ohio:
Most: Cleveland
Least: Columbus
***I know some would disagree with me on this. But I lived in Columbus and it seems to have more of a sunbelt economy and younger population than the rest of Ohio in general.

Massachusetts:
Most: Boston
Least: Springfield
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