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Old 06-13-2019, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,508 posts, read 700,817 times
Reputation: 1938

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Washington, DC (neighborhoods)

Most: National Mall

Least: North Portal Estates (secluded, hilly, surrounded by forest, all single-family homes, very white but not rich enough to have mansions, far from any government buildings or embassies)
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Old 06-13-2019, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Greater Boston (Formerly Orlando and New York)
510 posts, read 196,859 times
Reputation: 498
Massachusetts

For the stereotype that it is not-so-classy Irish, Sport Loving Wicked spitting people living in Triple Deckas or similar looking homes
Most Like It: Swampscott, MA (The Dunkies commercial is a good example of fellow Swampscotters)
Least Like It: Wellesley Hills, MA (Posh and very stuck up) or Great Barrington, MA (Basically NY)

For the stereotype that Mass is a leafy, liberal educated place with a lot of colleges
Most Like It: Cambridge, MA or Brookline, MA (Both equally liberal and well educated)
Least Like It: Brockton, MA (Crime, no colleges, not the traditional view of Mass)
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Old 06-14-2019, 01:26 AM
Status: "You picked the wrong fool, fool." (set 4 days ago)
 
484 posts, read 124,589 times
Reputation: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
Maryland

Most: the region around the Chespeake Bay, including Baltimore and Annapolis
Least: the suburban.urban areas close to DC

Delaware

Most: Probably the stretch between Dover and Rehoboth Beach
Least: Northern New Castle county (more like SE PA/South Jersey)

Pennsylvania

Most: The region that lies in the piedmont, including the Philly suburbs and Dutch country
Least: The area around Erie (feels more like northern Ohio)

Connecticut

(for those who view it as an integral part of New England)

Most: The Hartford to New Haven corridor
Least: Fairfield county

(for those who view it as an extension of the NYC region)

Most: Fairfield county
Least: Eastern Connecticut

Ohio

Most: NE Ohio (a mix of Rust belt, agricultural areas, and hills)
Least: SE Ohio (too hilly and too rural)

Indiana

Most: Central Indiana, in and around Indy
Least: NW Indiana (Chicago extension)

Michigan

Most: SE Michigan
Least: The western half of the UP

Kentucky

Most: The bluegrass region in and around Lexington
Least: The Cincinnati suburbs of KY

Illinois

(for those who view it as urban)

Most: Chicagoland
Least: The southernmost 25 miles

(for those who view it as a flat, rural prairie state)

Most: Central and parts of Southern Illinois
Least: Chicagoland
Who would view Illinois as urban? Maybe 10% of its urban. Then again New York is the same way but it has bigger metro areas and more of them.
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Old 06-14-2019, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,508 posts, read 700,817 times
Reputation: 1938
States that have not been done yet, unless I missed them:

Idaho
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Oklahoma
Arkansas
Maine
Vermont
New Hampshire
Rhode Island

Anyone lived in or spent serious time in any of these?
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Old 06-14-2019, 05:27 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,189 posts, read 1,293,245 times
Reputation: 2040
Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
Massachusetts

For the stereotype that it is not-so-classy Irish, Sport Loving Wicked spitting people living in Triple Deckas or similar looking homes
Most Like It: Swampscott, MA (The Dunkies commercial is a good example of fellow Swampscotters)
Least Like It: Wellesley Hills, MA (Posh and very stuck up) or Great Barrington, MA (Basically NY)

For the stereotype that Mass is a leafy, liberal educated place with a lot of colleges
Most Like It: Cambridge, MA or Brookline, MA (Both equally liberal and well educated)
Least Like It: Brockton, MA (Crime, no colleges, not the traditional view of Mass)
I actually realized Lawrence MA is least like the stereotype. 80k people and 80% Latino. In 2009-2011 was one of the poorest cities in the country. Major drug trafficking hub-most Dominican city in the country.
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Old 06-14-2019, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,492 posts, read 1,594,226 times
Reputation: 4382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Most - Panhandle, West Texas like Amarillo and Abilene
Least - some of the Dallas suburbs like Arlington or Plano
I'd say Arlington and Plano fit the stereotype quite well: sprawly, modern, corporate-centric, and car-centric. Not everything in Texas is all cowboys and Indians. In fact, Arlen, TX from "King of the Hill", the poster boy of (sub)urban Texas, is allegedly based on a Dallas suburb.

The place that doesn't fit the stereotype would be Galveston. It's compact, walkable, historic, and full of quirky elements. Based on the photos I saw, its main downtown attraction looks like Coney Island or Santa Monica Pier. Not exactly what I imagine when I hear the name. Texas
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Old 06-14-2019, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63178
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
States that have not been done yet, unless I missed them:

Idaho
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Oklahoma
Arkansas
Maine
Vermont
New Hampshire
Rhode Island

Anyone lived in or spent serious time in any of these?
I'll take Arkansas- much of my family lives there so though I haven't lived there I've visited all over the state many times.

Most: Small rural towns like Magnolia, Stamps, Pine Bluff, Searcy, El Dorado, etc. Small, dusty Delta towns.
Least: Towns in the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains, that have an Appalachian vibe - Mt. Ida, Mountain View, and places like Hot Springs Village that are filled with transplants from all over the US.

I don't know - prior to family moving to these more mountainous areas, I always just thought of Arkansas as being sort of flat and rural and full of only people from Arkansas, because after all, who moves TO Arkansas?
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Old 06-14-2019, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,213 posts, read 2,499,142 times
Reputation: 5646
Montana
This is a tough one. Most people only seem to know Missoula but Missoula does not have the western image that comes to mind when you hear Montana.

Most: Helena. It has a little of everything. Mountains, rodeos, ranching, libretarian, and dry. Pretty much every small town and virtually all "cities" in MT fit the stereotype in some way. Billings would make a good case too if you don't picture tall mountains but dry rugged plains (which is 2/3's of MT).

Least: Whitefish. It's wealthier than most areas, more educated, doesn't have that western feel (mostly a ski town), and I'd wager it has one of the highest population of non-native Montanans.
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Old 06-14-2019, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
7,991 posts, read 16,045,518 times
Reputation: 9332
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
States that have not been done yet, unless I missed them:

Idaho
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Oklahoma
Arkansas
Maine
Vermont
New Hampshire
Rhode Island

Anyone lived in or spent serious time in any of these?
I'll try Maine and RI - lived in Both. GF's family is in VT so I'll try that too.

Vermont
Most: Waterbury - home of Ben and Jerry's cute downtown, in the green mountains, legendary craft beer spot (Prohibition Pig), etc. Neighboring Stowe is also a good candidate for this spot.
Least: Rutland maybe? It's not your typical "cute" VT town, nor is it a charming small city like Burlington, Brattleboro, or Montpelier. It also has a disproportionate amount of suburban retail compared to most other VT towns.

Rhode Island
Most: Newport. Preppy, charming, and nautical. Basically the "Ocean State" in a tinier package. Honorable mentions to Bristol and East Greenwich which are also cute coastal towns.
Least: Foster. Interior, largely rural and wooded. Not much too it. I think everyone sort of assumes tiny Rhode Island is all coast and city. Foster is an outlier. a few towns along the CT border could fit this bill.

Maine:
Most: Camden, Bar Harbor, Rockland, Belfast. When people think "Maine," it's generally cutesy coastal towns, rugged rocky coast, lobster and lighthouses. These are probably the biggest examples of that, though there are plenty.
Least: Tough call because you can go different ways - I lean towards Madawaska. It's an industrial town at the crown of Maine. It's neither coastal, nor is it in the Western Maine Mountains. You could make the case for a place like Old Orchard Beach which is closer to the typical Mid-Atlantic beach town (built up development along a wide sandy beach, big public pier, carnival rides, etc.) than it is to your standard Maine coastal community, but it's still very much a beach/ocean community so I had to go with Madawaska. Most towns in the "County" could fit.
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:30 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 7 days ago)
 
47,974 posts, read 45,435,742 times
Reputation: 15309
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
States that have not been done yet, unless I missed them:

Idaho
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Oklahoma
Arkansas
Maine
Vermont
New Hampshire
Rhode Island

Anyone lived in or spent serious time in any of these?
I'll do Oklahoma.

Oklahoma City. Part of the Great Plains, large livestock market, petroleum, cowboys.
Southeast Oklahoma: Wettest part of Oklahoma, hilly and green. More in common with Arkansas and Northern Louisiana (Idabel, OK, the southernmost part of Oklahoma, is closer to Shreveport,Louisiana than Oklahoma City, despite OK sharing no border with Louisiana.
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