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Old 12-09-2016, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,928 posts, read 2,209,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyngawf View Post
I live in Coeur d"Alene and agree with you. I don't think Spokane would have any growth if Coeur d'Alene wasn't so close.
As far as low population of Id, Wy and Mt, I think Wy and Mt is it's just to cold. Kinda the same for Pocatello and Idaho falls. Boise and North Idaho have been growing pretty strong in recent years.
I don't know the Spokane/Coeur d' Alene area very well, but what makes you say that Coeur d'Alene is feeding all the growth, it's only grown by about 14,608 people since 2000, Spokane has grown by 17,643 and Spokane Valley has grown by 13,992. I've always thought that Spokane was the anchor and major employment center of the region, rather than Coeur d' Alene. It's probably a very popular place to live, but I would assume that most people would commute to Spokane. And If Coeur d'Alene was driving the growth, wouldn't it be the second largest city in the CSA rather than Spokane Valley, which is nearly twice as large. But I'm pretty sure that Coeur d'Alene helps with the growth, but I just don't see why it would be creating so much growth in a neighboring city?
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Old 12-09-2016, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,532 posts, read 3,679,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I don't know the Spokane/Coeur d' Alene area very well, but what makes you say that Coeur d'Alene is feeding all the growth, it's only grown by about 14,608 people since 2000, Spokane has grown by 17,643 and Spokane Valley has grown by 13,992. I've always thought that Spokane was the anchor and major employment center of the region, rather than Coeur d' Alene. It's probably a very popular place to live, but I would assume that most people would commute to Spokane. And If Coeur d'Alene was driving the growth, wouldn't it be the second largest city in the CSA rather than Spokane Valley, which is nearly twice as large. But I'm pretty sure that Coeur d'Alene helps with the growth, but I just don't see why it would be creating so much growth in a neighboring city?
You bring up some important and true facts. As Spokane extends to the east (i.e. Spokane Valley), Coeur d'Alene will also grow. Simple economics here. New jobs in Spokane and Spokane Valley create new residents and new growth east into NID. Spokane drives the regional economy.
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Old 12-09-2016, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,633,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
The Snake River Valley in Idaho (which includes Boise area) doesn't have the worst climate, due to being west of the Continental Divide and at lower elevation than most areas of the interior NW, Boise is only around 2,000 ft.

But Montana and Wyoming are a different ball of wax. The coldest night I've ever experienced was in Little America, WY at 7,000 ft last December, woke up at 3am to a temperature of -12F. And Interstate 80 through WY is always getting closed in the late fall thru early spring due to blizzards with high winds
That doesn't mean that Wyoming's climate is so harsh that it cannot be populated. Like our state these very three large states are also climatically diverse. To be fair though, that was probably the coldest it gets at Little America given the month and time in the day, which is pretty decent. Sure -12 is not fun for everyone but, Fairbanks has gotten to -60. With modern technology, people can handle -12 just like we can handle 110.
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Old 12-09-2016, 11:34 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 6,109,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
.. it's just baffling we have areas like Denver who are booming with tech because people want to live there for the mountains when there's other cities/towns with even better mountain access. Not saying Colorado doesn't have great mountains but, it's not like they own a monopoly on that either. .
But it's not like the majority of people are moving to Denver just for access to mountains.

My buddy can walk to a MLB game from his apartment in Denver.
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Old 12-10-2016, 07:27 AM
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Location: Ontario
7,262 posts, read 4,489,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Wyoming is the smallest (population) state in the union. Montana and Idaho aren't too far ahead. Yet, all three are very large states. They have amazing wildlife, clean air, skiing, etc.

While Boise is a growing city, it always intrigued me that Wyoming, Montana or Idaho did not boom any earlier (or still not booming). They are beautiful States with a ton to offer in my opinion. Montana especially. Maybe I view the three with rosy glasses so to speak but what is so undesirable about them that they didn't boom? Or choose not to boom?
Interesting thread.

Some say climate.
Can't be just climate.

Calgary, Alberta ....just north of Montana, has more people than the entire state of MT.

Alberta has more people than all three states combined.

Maybe it's a combo of Americans have many other choices where to live,
and not enough jobs in the region, also kinda isolated, far from the coast too.
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Old 12-10-2016, 01:09 PM
 
21,182 posts, read 30,343,833 times
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I agree it's more than climate and has more to do with Corporate America's fascination largely with either coast. In a increasingly digital economy where location means much less, one can see areas of the Mountain West evolving with growth in college towns like Bozeman or Missoula MT, Pocatello and Moscow ID, or Laramie WY. Denver's evolution into a major city is relatively recent as it becomes overpopulated and more expensive, so one can see peripheral growth picking up in places up the I-25 corridor (such as Cheyenne WY) and while not as large the Salt Lake City-Ogden-Logan UT corridor filling in northward to Pocatello ID.
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Old 12-10-2016, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,532 posts, read 3,679,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
I agree it's more than climate and has more to do with Corporate America's fascination largely with either coast. In a increasingly digital economy where location means much less, one can see areas of the Mountain West evolving with growth in college towns like Bozeman or Missoula MT, Pocatello and Moscow ID, or Laramie WY. Denver's evolution into a major city is relatively recent as it becomes overpopulated and more expensive, so one can see peripheral growth picking up in places up the I-25 corridor (such as Cheyenne WY) and while not as large the Salt Lake City-Ogden-Logan UT corridor filling in northward to Pocatello ID.
That is true, but the I-15 corridor in Utah ends abruptly at Tremonton. There is little between there and Pocatello. Pocatello and Blackfoot, ID are actually struggling to gain population with negative net migration figures recently.
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Old 12-10-2016, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,633,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
I agree it's more than climate and has more to do with Corporate America's fascination largely with either coast. In a increasingly digital economy where location means much less, one can see areas of the Mountain West evolving with growth in college towns like Bozeman or Missoula MT, Pocatello and Moscow ID, or Laramie WY. Denver's evolution into a major city is relatively recent as it becomes overpopulated and more expensive, so one can see peripheral growth picking up in places up the I-25 corridor (such as Cheyenne WY) and while not as large the Salt Lake City-Ogden-Logan UT corridor filling in northward to Pocatello ID.
While I can see the benefits of being near an ocean and having beaches, as a desert citizen they don't matter too much. The Phoenix metro has about three lakes and multiple reservoirs that, by all technicalities, have beaches that one can fish, boat, and jet ski in. They are very fun and people love to go to them in the summer time. From my house, pretty far in Phoenix, I can get to one of the lakes in about half an hour. Most metros I have seen have some sort of water feature with a beach-like option, whereas it be a river, man-made lake, etc.

To be honest having the ocean isn't worth the extra premium. I sort of have an obsession of looking at houses. I looked at Seattle out of curiosity. You couldn't find a normal house (~2000 square feet) until like 500 or 600k and even then they were out of shape and needed some heavy updating. To get a house of that size in good condition, you're looking at a minimum of 700k. I checked the suburbs and this sort of held true as well. I'm sure Seattle has many pros, that's not up for question, but are the pros really worth more than what can be offered in MT, WY, and ID, which is easily half the price in COL? Would rather keep the savings and do a vacation.

The difference here is yes the economy is thriving in Seattle, no doubt, forcing people to pay for those high premiums. Really though if people had the option to live anywhere they could I doubt so many of them would pick Seattle because of housing costs alone. In comparison to Colorado or Denver, the amenities are literally the same to what's in MT/WY/ID. Sure temps are a little different but, climate change and all.

This is probably why Boise is booming TODAY.... but it doesn't explain why Boise wasn't booming YESTERDAY... reasons why the economy decided that this trio wasn't worth it is what I am looking for. They decided SLC and Denver were worth it, but not these three states.
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Old 12-10-2016, 11:10 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 6,109,166 times
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No answer is good enough for you. It's obviously a mystery that can never be solved. There is zero difference between living in Boise and Seattle. There's no reason to pick Denver over Cheyenne. They're exactly the same. Montana's NFL team is going to win the Super bowl this year.
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Old 12-11-2016, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Northern Rockies
148 posts, read 123,033 times
Reputation: 229
Same reason why Northern New England and the Dakotas are sparsely populated - climate. First, it's cold, at least in MT and WY. I have well over a foot of snow on the ground with another 6 inches expected tonight to go along with our -30 wind chills, and it's only early December. Furthermore, large swaths of Montana and Wyoming are too arid for significant agricultural development which was a hindrance to the development of towns and cities historically.
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