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Old 12-11-2016, 09:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
I divided the states that border Canada into different tiers. Each tier is not necessarily in order, I am kind of divided on my choices.

Tier I
1. Washington State (large population near each other)
2. New York State (large populations near each other, popular tourist destination for Canadians)
3. Michigan (large populations near each other)
4. Maine (small populations near each, tourist destination for Canadians)

Tier II
Minnesota
Vermont (tourist destination for Canadians)
North Dakota
Alaska

Tier III
New Hampshire (tourist destination for Canadians)
Montana

Tier IV
Idaho (very small unpopulated border)
The Only issue I have with Michigan is Detroit "Americanized" the Windsor area moreso than the other way around. For example Windsor is a center for the Canadian Auto Industry because of Detroit.
, 20-25% of Mainers speak French, Paul Lepage's (Maine Gov) First Language is French. So Canada influence Maine more than Maine influenced Canada. As far south as Woonsocket RI has Franco-American Schools.
New England and the Maritimes share cuisine and the Gulf of Maine/Grand Banks.
At Buffalo Sabres Games they play the US and Canadian National Anthem at all American matchups. Even Rochester has Canadian Flags everywhere, and you can get Poutine in Upstate NY.
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beasley106 View Post
Maine and Vermont are probably the only two US states that are heavily influenced from Canada due to the fact that in the past thousands of French Canadians have migrated to those states. There are even parts of Maine that still primarily speak French.

Most all the New England states have a high concentration of people with French-Canadian ancestry. Over 500k people left Quebec in the period from the late 1800's to the early 1900's and relocated to New England. They left their farms to seek a better life working in the textile mills of New England. There were for a long time enclaves of French Canadians throughout the region, both in the norther border states as well as southern New England states.
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Old 12-11-2016, 02:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Minnesota, Michigan....... hockey check, funny accent check, cold weather check, Tim hortons check, more liberal outlook check, polite reserved nature check, heck they could be provinces. Most of em watch so much hockey they can sing the Canadian national them.

Upper New York has some of these same qualities too from what I have been told, just maybe without the midwestern reservedness.
Canada does not have a universal "funny accent". I live in Toronto and you will not hear that type of accent here. It's also very difference from the upper Midwestern accent (which does not sound Canadian at IMO). The average Canadisn accent sounds more like something from Washington state than Minnesota.

Also Tim Horton's is rarely seen in Toronto or Vancouver. That is very "small town" Canadian culture. And Hockey doesn't matter to anyone in the GTA - again only small town Canada. We are also very multicultural.

I'm sorry to rant but I just hate how some Americans assume we all have stereotypical Canadian accents, like hockey and live in an ultra white society.

I think the only cities in the US like Canada are NYC (similar to Toronto in terms of diversity) and Seattle (similar to Vancouver).
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Old 12-11-2016, 03:06 PM
 
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Also Canadian't aren't "more liberal" than Americans. We actually really, really love money and capitalism and we're not nice.. at all.
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Old 12-11-2016, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toastyyy View Post
Canada does not have a universal "funny accent". I live in Toronto and you will not hear that type of accent here. It's also very difference from the upper Midwestern accent (which does not sound Canadian at IMO). The average Canadisn accent sounds more like something from Washington state than Minnesota.

Also Tim Horton's is rarely seen in Toronto or Vancouver. That is very "small town" Canadian culture. And Hockey doesn't matter to anyone in the GTA - again only small town Canada. We are also very multicultural.

I'm sorry to rant but I just hate how some Americans assume we all have stereotypical Canadian accents, like hockey and live in an ultra white society.

I think the only cities in the US like Canada are NYC (similar to Toronto in terms of diversity) and Seattle (similar to Vancouver).
Speak for yourself, dude. I'm pretty sure there's a crap ton of NHL fans all over the Toronto area. I mean someone's gotta root for the Leafs! There's tons of hockey fans in New York, in Boston, in Pittsburgh, in Minneapolis, in Montreal, in Vancouver and you're telling me for someone reason there's none in Toronto? I know your team sucks but still!

Even here in the DFW area there's plenty of Stars fans.
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Old 12-11-2016, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Probably Alaska, Michigan and Minnesota as well as Maine, Vermont and upstate New York. I think a more interesting question is which state that DOESN'T border Canada, is the most influenced.
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Old 12-11-2016, 06:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Probably Alaska, Michigan and Minnesota as well as Maine, Vermont and upstate New York. I think a more interesting question is which state that DOESN'T border Canada, is the most influenced.
Assuming you discount lake borders (WI, OH, PA) its probably Michigan. MI influences the part of Canada adjacent to it rather than the other way around. While Maine, NH, Vermont, and Upstate NY have a greater flow south of influence over the border than vice-versa.
This is because along the border the bigger cities are just over the border in Canada (Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, QC, St John) until you get to Detroit, where the big city is on the American Side
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:54 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,909,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beasley106 View Post
Maine and Vermont are probably the only two US states that are heavily influenced from Canada due to the fact that in the past thousands of French Canadians have migrated to those states. There are even parts of Maine that still primarily speak French.
They moved to New York and New Hampshire as well I believe.

New York also gets a ton of Canadian tourists especially in places like the Adirondacks (in Montreal's backyard) and the Thousand Islands. This is not surprising because New York is the only state that borders both of Canada's largest provinces; Ontario and Quebec.
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Old 12-11-2016, 10:43 PM
 
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I would think Alaska is up there.
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Old 12-12-2016, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,231 posts, read 2,512,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
UP of Michigan, maybe? I'm really just guessing though.


Nope, with the exception of the SOO. The only way to get to Canada from here is through Sault Ste. Marie, island hopping in Lake Huron or taking a large boat across Lake Superior. We're more influenced by Wisconsin.
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