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View Poll Results: DC's suburbs are most similar to those of
NY/NJ 14 28.57%
Atlanta 32 65.31%
The Bay Area 3 6.12%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 12-13-2016, 04:26 PM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 5 days ago)
 
1,223 posts, read 579,138 times
Reputation: 1183

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^^^Nothing wrong at all with being Southern but I do get the feeling that it's very backhanded. On this board, "Southern" is a nice little euphemism for many things rolled into one. Anyway, ATL doesn't have Mid-Atlantic culture at all like NoVA but the burbs of both has some similarities to me. I don't really see the RDU/NoVA connection.

I think most Atlantans including myself see the Southern in this convo as codeword for "small-time" compared with RDU and that's really absurd anyway you look at it. That's like someone from STL saying that Chicago is very MidWestern while trying to highlight similarities they have with a city in another region. Kind of silly.


Edit: This is all in fun....spirited debates and whatnot.
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Old 12-13-2016, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
561 posts, read 538,499 times
Reputation: 1061
I think the bottom line is that RDU is kind of a wild card here, and would not be more comparable to the NoVA/DC region than Atlanta is. Atlanta and DC are regularly compared as metro areas for a number of valid reasons from transportation infrastructure to demographics. RDU and NoVA may compare favorably on tech-focused industry, but beyond that I don't really see it. Traveling between the core components of the RDU region still gives the impression of a much lower level of connectivity than traversing NoVA or the Atlanta suburbs. There's plenty of lower density development in all these places, but it's really apparent in RDU. Everything is car-oriented and while you've got North Hills, Raleigh proper, Chapel Hill, Cary, Morrisville, Durham, etc., I don't think there's anything in the RDU area that genuinely compares with Buckhead, Sandy Springs; Tysons or Arlington. I don't think it has anything to do with being "southern." More about impact and feel.

Beyond Atlanta, I would suggest that Philadelphia or even better, the Bay area offer good comparisons on many levels (than RDU). Looking to the Bay Area, you have numerous high-income, largely walkable and liberal suburbs with a tech focus, e.g. Palo Alto, Redwood City, San Jose, etc. vis-a-vis Arlington/Crystal City, Alexandria, Tysons, etc. These burbs are largely linked by continuous development that I would hesitate to call outright sprawl, though much of it is just that. There is a reverse commuter dynamic where many trek out to far flung tech burbs from the city propers daily. Ridiculous CoL in the city propers partially fueled by limitations on grander-scale housing development within city limits. Elitist attitudes. There is global sense of diversity to an extent, albeit NoVA retains a more southeastern demographic profile overall. There are a number of transit options, e.g. commuter rail, BRT, light rail, subway, more extensive use of bike lanes. But you may have to have a car in SF whereas you can more comfortably forego a car in the DC area and Northern Virginia inside the beltway. A number of airports, etc., etc.
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Old 12-20-2016, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Baltimore MD/Durham NC
530 posts, read 451,765 times
Reputation: 748
Quote:
I agree with this, places like chapel hill, raleigh and durham are very southern.
Not to derail the thread, but this is a very strong statement that I just don't think is true. There are large swarths of the triangle that are completely transplant dominated.

Percents of population born in NC:

Chapel Hill: 36
Apex: 35
Cary: 30
Carrboro: 28
Morrisville: 28


Hell, some of these numbers aren't much different than the percent of people born in another country
Morrisville: 27
Carrboro: 21
Cary: 19


And even both Durham and Raleigh fall at 49 and 46 with most of the population not being born in NC. Really not trying to wade into this debate, just wanted to make this little point.
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Old 12-20-2016, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
449 posts, read 818,836 times
Reputation: 373
As one who lives in Metro Atlanta, but who travels very frequently to NC on business, and has family in NC, I'll say that Metro Atlanta, as a whole, is less Southern than either Charlotte or RDU. When it comes to the Greensboro-WS-HP Metro, Metro Atlanta is noticeably less Southern. As far as the rest of GA and NC outside of Metro Atlanta, and the NC Big Three, they are both equally Southern / Southern Appalachia!!

Back to the subject, I have to say that the Atlanta and DC suburbs have the closest comparison in most all metrics., except for the DMV being more overall liberal politically!!
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Old 12-21-2016, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
3,295 posts, read 1,647,912 times
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Atlanta. Raleigh-Durahm would probably be an even more similar to DC.

I don't see the DC suburbs as being similar to SF/Bay area or some of these other areas mentioned.
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Old 12-21-2016, 06:14 AM
 
29,889 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18435
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Atlanta. Raleigh-Durahm would probably be an even more similar to DC.
I think that's only the case politically. In terms of layout, infrastructure, etc., suburban DC has a leg up on both but is more similar to Atlanta (e.g., HRT, diversity, New Urbanist developments, etc.).
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Old 01-30-2017, 06:40 AM
 
1,462 posts, read 935,856 times
Reputation: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atony View Post
Not to derail the thread, but this is a very strong statement that I just don't think is true. There are large swarths of the triangle that are completely transplant dominated.

Percents of population born in NC:

Chapel Hill: 36
Apex: 35
Cary: 30
Carrboro: 28
Morrisville: 28


Hell, some of these numbers aren't much different than the percent of people born in another country
Morrisville: 27
Carrboro: 21
Cary: 19


And even both Durham and Raleigh fall at 49 and 46 with most of the population not being born in NC. Really not trying to wade into this debate, just wanted to make this little point.
If you are comparing to Atlanta like whoever brought it up,Atlanta has at least six counties that are at least 40 percent transplants.A few over 35%.

So not sure why some people actually think Raliegh area or anywhere in North Carolina would be more.

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Old 01-30-2017, 12:27 PM
 
1,593 posts, read 831,682 times
Reputation: 1216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Why is it bad to be southern? That's something to be proud of.
Why is it good to be Southern? Are you better than me because I'm not from the South? I've never understood "I'm proud to be from ----" When people say they're proud to be from somewhere they always say the same thing

I'm from New England "we're hard working" Oh you're from the Midwest you're also "hard working" oh you're also "hard working" what are we doing here?

Its the same thing with high school sports, "that town next to us that seems to be the same in almost every way sucks, but our town is the greatest"
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Old 01-30-2017, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,849 posts, read 2,975,563 times
Reputation: 3394
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
Why is it good to be Southern? Are you better than me because I'm not from the South? I've never understood "I'm proud to be from ----" When people say they're proud to be from somewhere they always say the same thing

I'm from New England "we're hard working" Oh you're from the Midwest you're also "hard working" oh you're also "hard working" what are we doing here?

Its the same thing with high school sports, "that town next to us that seems to be the same in almost every way sucks, but our town is the greatest"
Is it actually good or bad? I'm from Texas, but I also realize there's a whole different (not better or worse) out there.

I will say "I'm proud to be from" guys tend to have lower self esteem.
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Old 01-30-2017, 12:53 PM
 
29,889 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Is it actually good or bad? I'm from Texas, but I also realize there's a whole different (not better or worse) out there.

I will say "I'm proud to be from" guys tend to have lower self esteem.
Source?
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