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Old 12-13-2016, 01:41 PM
 
2,729 posts, read 5,154,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuda1337 View Post

Colorado is super intriguing, but I'm really worried about the brownness of it. I don't think I'll have an answer on this until I go out there and spend some time. The point about the prominence of the mountains not being any higher than the blue ridge is a great point. I think the reason it looks more alluring is due to the long sight ranges you have from many of the hiking/biking pictures I've seen. Whereas with the Blue Ridge area it seems that you are IN the mountain and don't get those huge sight lines.


Boise I don't know a lot about, but will continue to search into. I am slightly worried about the cold there.

Bend, OR is also intriguing. I've read mixed opinions about the area.

My wife is keen on SLC. I'm not to sure if its more like Colorado or not... still researching that too.

I've also taken the considerations of a few people here and looking at some cities in AZ and NM, although I'm not super optimistic I'll find something that hits all the right areas for us.


I wish there was a nice little city of 50k outside of Yellowstone or Yosemite so I could live in the city and drive an hour to one of these amazing national parks on the weekend. That's my ideal scenario, but I realize that city doesn't really exist.
The average winter temps for Boise, Denver, and Salt Lake are similar. All three of these cities are dominated by deciduous trees, so they are green during the warm months, brownish during the winter. Boise is the nearest to evergreen forests and the largest expanse of contiguous forest at that amongst the three cities. Boise is also the gateway to some of the finest whitewater in the nation as well as endless mountains, forests, and wilderness.

If you can deal with winter your best bet would be Coeur d'Alene because there you would be able to live in evergreen forests.
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Old 12-13-2016, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Olympia, Washington
1,273 posts, read 704,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
The average winter temps for Boise, Denver, and Salt Lake are similar. All three of these cities are dominated by deciduous trees, so they are green during the warm months, brownish during the winter. Boise is the nearest to evergreen forests and the largest expanse of contiguous forest at that amongst the three cities. Boise is also the gateway to some of the finest whitewater in the nation as well as endless mountains, forests, and wilderness.

If you can deal with winter your best bet would be Coeur d'Alene because there you would be able to live in evergreen forests.
I'm not very familiar with Idaho other than driving through it to get to Washington but I will say I was very impressed at how beautiful it was. Drove through Coeur d'Alene and yeah definitely very nice in terms of scenery. No idea how the actual city itself is however.

As for OP's question I'd say it sounds like some place in California or the Southwest somewhere is what you want? Seems you ruled out east coast cause the mountains aren't big enough. The PNW since it's too cloudy and rainy. And places like Montana or Wyoming cause it's too cold. I can't imagine everywhere in California has a super high COL.
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Old 12-13-2016, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,085 posts, read 2,123,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
The average winter temps for Boise, Denver, and Salt Lake are similar. All three of these cities are dominated by deciduous trees, so they are green during the warm months, brownish during the winter. Boise is the nearest to evergreen forests and the largest expanse of contiguous forest at that amongst the three cities. Boise is also the gateway to some of the finest whitewater in the nation as well as endless mountains, forests, and wilderness.

If you can deal with winter your best bet would be Coeur d'Alene because there you would be able to live in evergreen forests.

Boise is near enough to the confluence of several large rivers to have access to water that many in Colorado can only dream about. But south and east of there it is as tan as Colorado's great plains.
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Old 12-13-2016, 03:54 PM
 
2,729 posts, read 5,154,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Boise is near enough to the confluence of several large rivers to have access to water that many in Colorado can only dream about. But south and east of there it is as tan as Colorado's great plains.
The big difference regarding the Snake River Plains southeast of Boise vs. Colorado's plains is that mountains are always in view, the Snake Plains have mountains on all sides, it is like a big valley surrounded by distant mountains, the same can't be said for Colorado's plains.

The Snake River Plain also has rivers and deep canyons popular for whitewater and kayaking which the OP is interested in among other outdoor activities.
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Old 12-13-2016, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,026,385 times
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California isn't as "unaffordable" as you think it may be. You can still get a condo one mile from the beach for about 400K (and almost a guarantee of appreciation). Earthquakes are few and far between.

I enjoy the ability to get on the water and go rowing almost every morning. I can sail or ride my bike daily. Mountains that are over 10,000 feet high are less than 2 hours away, with winter sports in the winter, and plenty of hiking and camping in the summer. Deserts are also nearby.

The "big" national Parks are less than a day's drive away. I've lived here for over 20 years and still find new things to do every weekend.
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Old 12-13-2016, 05:18 PM
 
78 posts, read 73,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
California isn't as "unaffordable" as you think it may be. You can still get a condo one mile from the beach for about 400K (and almost a guarantee of appreciation). Earthquakes are few and far between.

I enjoy the ability to get on the water and go rowing almost every morning. I can sail or ride my bike daily. Mountains that are over 10,000 feet high are less than 2 hours away, with winter sports in the winter, and plenty of hiking and camping in the summer. Deserts are also nearby.

The "big" national Parks are less than a day's drive away. I've lived here for over 20 years and still find new things to do every weekend.
If we weren't looking to buy a big piece of land (2+ acres) California might be in play. But to find that kind of land in a desirable area there and build a house seems like it wouldn't really be possible.
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Old 12-13-2016, 06:44 PM
 
5,694 posts, read 8,766,777 times
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Quote:
Whereas with the Blue Ridge area it seems that you are IN the mountain and don't get those huge sight lines.


It is so frustrating to me to see you keep repeating this comment. You may have a perfectly valid reason for hating on Knoxville but are too polite to say. Ex wife, flat tire on the freeway, or simply you hate the color orange. I suppose I should appreciate your discretion.

Just because you choose to ignore one of the best places in the Southeast for "huge long range sight lines" doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

You might also consider that just because one poster on this forum says the economy is in the dumps doesn't mean its the truth. There are plenty of places on the web for a reality check.

Now if you were to visit and say "mmm.. a bit too scruffy for my taste" that's fine. Just please don't go on and on about a lack of long range sightlines.
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Old 12-13-2016, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,948 posts, read 2,222,087 times
Reputation: 2619
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirt _farmer View Post
1) find a job in Bend, Oregon (on the sunny, dry side of the Cascades)

2) once that job is found, move to Bend, Oregon.

Without (1), (2) is very hard to do.
as far as climate I think that Eastern WA is better since it's at a much lower elevation and the nights are not as frigid.

One city I like is Wenatchee, it's not super big, the urban area only has about ~60,000 people but it's surrounded by very beautiful scenery and has a decent downtown.


https://static1.squarespace.com/stat...g?format=2500w

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.4245...7i13312!8i6656

There are other larger cities such as Yakima, Spokane, and Tri-Cities (Has the mildest winters, warmer than Bend) but they are not as close to the mountains as Wenatchee.
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Old 12-13-2016, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,948 posts, read 2,222,087 times
Reputation: 2619
Also another great thing about Wenatchee is that it's only ~20 minutes away from Mission Ridge Ski Area


http://www.snow-forecast.com/system/...jpg?1377207330

and then there is also Lake Chelan which is a ~50 mi long lake only about an hour away.


https://images.trvl-media.com/media/...ate-151789.jpg


http://www.willhiteweb.com/washingto...washington.jpg
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Old 12-13-2016, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,121 posts, read 22,989,204 times
Reputation: 35310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuda1337 View Post
If we weren't looking to buy a big piece of land (2+ acres) California might be in play. But to find that kind of land in a desirable area there and build a house seems like it wouldn't really be possible.
OMG, you think 2 acres is big? Bwahaaahaaahaaaahaaaa!

Yep, no affordable properties of 2 acres in the entire state of CA. Anywhere you'd want to live. Better keep looking.
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